18th > October > 2005 Archive

The Register breaking news

Wikipedia founder admits to serious quality problems

Encouraging signs from the Wikipedia project, where co-founder and überpedian Jimmy Wales has acknowledged there are real quality problems with the online work.

Sun gives Unix giants a plus

If you're in the market for a $1m server, then Sun Microsystems has a new system for you.
fingers pointing at man

RSA hears from ex-MI5 boss

The sixth annual RSA Security conference was opened by the disturbing sight of David Taylor dressed in a grey, silk dressing gown brandishing a long cigarette-holder like a hirsute Noel Coward. Fortunately the business leader was not reprising the title of his book – The Naked Leader – but opening the Prohibition-themed conference. Taylor outlined the role of Elisabeth Smith Friedman's successful code-breaking in catching rum runners during the Prohibition era.

IBM piles up earnings in Q3

IBM slipped past expectations in its third quarter results published yesterday with the offloading of its PC business to Lenovo this year still putting a shine on its numbers.

Internet worries US consumers

Americans are more worried than Europeans about identity theft and online fraud.

Lloyds TSB tests password-generators

Around 30,000 customers of Lloyds TSB are being issued with a password-generating device that will add an extra layer of security when they do their online banking. But while it makes customers less vulnerable to internet fraud, the bank says its device is "not the end solution".
For Sale sign detail

Liferay after Plumtree

Analysis Plumtree is being acquired by BEA. This raises two points. The first is the perennial question of integration that arises whenever a vendor buys another that has a directly competing offering: how will the two products be merged? How long will it take? Will they, in fact, be merged at all? If not, how long will the acquired product continue to be supported? And so on and so forth. Interesting questions but it is not my intention to address these in this article.

Sage upbeat on trading

Sage today said it will meet market expectations for the financial year to September 30. In a trading update, the company said revenues were up 14 per cent on last year to £777m and pre-tax profits were up 13 per cent to £204m. The accounting software giant will publish a full set of results on 30 November.
The Register breaking news

VeriSign aggregates Moreover

Net infrastructure firm VeriSign yesterday acquired content aggregator Moreover Technologies in a deal valued at about $30m cash. VeriSign plans to combine Moreover's content aggregation services with its own feed technology to create a real-time aggregation platform for bloggers, publishers, enterprises and Web portals.
The Register breaking news

Pipex gobbles up Freedom 2 Surf

Pipex has bought Freedom to Surf (F2S) for £10m, to boost its investment in local loop unbundling (LLU).
homeless man with sign

CA casts light on iLumin

Computer Associates is rounding out its BrightStor storage management software through acquisition. iLumin Software Services, bought for an undisclosed sum, brings on email and instant messaging archiving capabilities. The firm's Assentor lines supports Microsoft Exchange, Lotus Domino, Novell GroupWise and other platforms.
The Register breaking news

e-gov head calls for Transformation Meditation

The head of e-government Ian Watmore has, in defiance of his own job title, called time on e-government, and asked local authority IT managers to get ready for t-government instead.

Say hello to the Skype Trojan

Virus writers are targeting Skype users with a new Trojan that poses as the latest version of the popular VoIP software.
The Register breaking news

HM Customs warns of e-Xmas duty

With boffins predicting another bumper e-Xmas, officials in the UK are advising shoppers that they face import taxes and VAT if they buy pressies from overseas.
For Sale sign detail

Small.biz flocks to the web

More small retailers than ever have a presence on the internet, according to a new study from ecommerce firm Actinic, which shows that a quarter of small and medium sized retail companies in the UK now have their own website, up from just secen per cent last year.
The Register breaking news

3 UK lets subscribers be video stars

Forget all those glossy images of high-powered financiers during due diligence and making stock trades on their 3G mobiles.
Joe Fay, 18 2005

Cisco extends network protection

Cisco is extending the reach of its two-year old Network Admission Control scheme to include more devices and more companies.
hands waving dollar bills in the air

Security pros win out in office politics

More than a quarter (25.4 per cent) of the security workforce in Europe spends most of their workday dealing with internal politics or selling security to upper management, according to early results from a new survey. The second annual workforce study from security certification and training organisation ISC(2) also found that either researching or implementing new technologies occupied the majority of time for around a third (30.1 per cent) of the 595 experienced security practitioners and managers quizzed.
The Register breaking news

International laws for international crimes

RSA Europe, 2005 Global cooperation on information security is still at the pipe-dream stage if a panel at the RSA Security conference this week is anything to go by.

ID card debates need reframing

RSA Europe 2005 Dame Pauline Neville-Jones, ex-chairman of Qinetiq and a former head of the Joint Intelligence Committee which oversees UK security services, told the Register that international agreements on security and technology are needed for the good of the business community and wealth generation, rather than as a tool against terrorists.

Unisys to decimate workforce after poor Q3

Unisys admitted a dismal third quarter yesterday and promptly promised Wall St it would dump 10 per cent of its workers over the next year.
Joe Fay, 18 2005
The Register breaking news

Bird flu: you'll die but your IT will survive

If the latest news from the wonderful world of Pandemia has got your organisation running around like a headless Romanian chicken, then don't fret: Gartner has released an essential guide to avian influenza, aka bird flu, aka Black Death II, which mercifully states that although you will most likely be lying dead among the smouldering ruins of society, your IT infrastructure can be saved for future generations.
The Register breaking news

UK ID card a recipe for massive ID fraud, says Microsoft exec

Microsoft UK National Technology Officer Jerry Fishenden has warned that the UK ID card scheme could trigger "massive identity fraud on a scale beyond anything we have seen before." Writing in today's Scotsman, Fishenden says that the security implications of storing biometrics centrally are enormous. "Unlike other forms of information such as credit card details," he says, "if core biometric details such as your fingerprints are compromised, it is not going to be possible to provide you with new ones."

Pearl casts 950 jobs over to Tata

Some 950 back office and IT jobs at UK insurance outfit Pearl Group are to be transferred to Tata Consultancy Services (TCS).
The Register breaking news

UK political party flogged on eBay

The MP3 Party, a UK political party which aimed to simplify British government and civil administration, has put itself up for sale on eBay.
The Register breaking news

Black helicopters prompt burnt toast pandemic

Letters The government has pitched the price of a standalone ID card at a mere £30, presumably to try to encourage a buy-early-to-save-money rush on the things, if they do manage to get them through both houses of parliament. You still don't seem to like the idea of them very much, but your thoughts on the subject do seem to be tending towards the rather desperate humour of the condemned man:
homeless man with sign

IBM takes hardware route to SOA

IBM has bought XML device specialist DataPower to improve the security, performance and integration of web services messages running on Service Oriented Architectures (SOAs). Terms are undisclosed.
graph up

PC shipments surge

PC shipments are on the increase again, despite rising interest rates and spiralling oil prices.
homeless man with sign

Fujitsu breaks from Intel-only camp, embraces Opteron

AMD continues to add big names to the Opteron camp with Fujitsu today revealing plans to sell two servers based on the dual-core, 64-bit chip.

MySQL destined for 'majority' market share

With MySQL experiencing a possible backlash, it seems the company can confidently flip the middle finger to certain critics with the latest market share numbers from Evans Data Corp (EDC).

Old dog VMware learns new server partitioning tricks

VMware stands as a rarity in the virtualization game. It's an old timer - a grizzled veteran. Few, if any, other companies in the x86 market can claim such a diverse, virtualized customer base or say they're on the third, fourth or fifth generation of a product.
Broken CD with wrench

Legal charge mars Intel's sparkling Q3

Intel cited broad success across all of its major product lines during a healthy third quarter FY2005. Despite record revenue, however, Intel missed earnings expectations by a penny due to a large legal charge.
The Register breaking news

Motorola's Zndr toasts record Q3

Motorola claimed 19 per cent of the worldwide market for mobile phones, its highest share for some years in a booming third quarter.
The Register breaking news

Bird flu fever hits eBay

Internet auctioneer eBay has shut down sales through it service of Tamiflu, which can help reduce the severity of avian flu, amid growing concern of a potential pandemic that could kill humans.
The Register breaking news

Apple and Disney's two-inch disappointment

Opinion The AP went with "groundbreaking." Robert Iger, Disney's new chief, exclaimed, "This is the first giant step to making more content available to more people online." Such praise, however, shot well over the rather humble news last week that a video iPod arrived which will play ABC TV shows for $1.99 a pop.