Feeds

Security pros win out in office politics

Business managers starting to listen (allegedly)

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More than a quarter (25.4 per cent) of the security workforce in Europe spends most of their workday dealing with internal politics or selling security to upper management, according to early results from a new survey. The second annual workforce study from security certification and training organisation ISC(2) also found that either researching or implementing new technologies occupied the majority of time for around a third (30.1 per cent) of the 595 experienced security practitioners and managers quizzed.

According to the survey, the efforts of many in the profession to sell their value to the organisations they work for are beginning to pay off. Survey respondents were generally optimistic about levels of influence within their organizations, with a third (33.4 per cent) saying that information security’s level of influence within business units and executive management has significantly increased.

The survey, conducted by analyst firm IDC on behalf of ISC(2), also looked at the places inhabited by security functions within organisations. Around one in five (18.8 per cent) of those quizzed report into a dedicated security or information assurance department, with another one in ten (10.5 per cent) reporting directly to the board of directors and 17.4 per cent to executive management. This compares to around a quarter (28.4 per cent) who indicated they reported directly into an IT department. "We are encouraged to see from the study strong evidence that information security is becoming a domain in its own right, separate from IT, and backed by a swell in the desire to professionalise security as a recognised field of practice," said Sarah Bohne, director of communications at (ISC)2.

Around two-thirds of survey respondents (62.2 per cent) said they would be pursuing information security certifications in the next 12 months. The demand for training reflects a desire by those quizzed to learn broader management skills, with the top areas of interest including information risk management (51.3 per cent), business continuity and disaster recovery (50.6 per cent) and security management practices (44.1 per cent).

A preview of findings from (ISC)2 Information Security: The Shape of the Profession was delivered during a presentation at this week's RSA Europe conference in Vienna, Austria. The full report of global results, including salaries, and the expected rate of growth in the information security workforce, is due to be published in December. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.