Feeds

Authorities swoop on illicit Wolverhampton SPAM FARM

Hundreds of SIM cards being brutally battery-farmed to pump out pink meat

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

UK data privacy experts have raided an SMS spam farm blamed for spewing out more than 350,000 nuisance messages to mobiles.

The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) seized hundreds of SIM cards on Thursday, after raiding a SIM farm in offices in Wolverhampton. Initial estimates suggest the impounded kit could have been used to send over 350,000 nuisance text messages - but the total may have been more than a million.

Computer equipment and paperwork were seized, and a residential address was also searched as part of an ongoing investigation by the ICO.

Andy Curry, an enforcement manager at the ICO, said that if found responsible a "sizeable fine" would be levied against the alleged mobile spammers.

The raid was prompted by intelligence supported by reports using the "7726" tool, that allows mobile phone users to report spam text messages by forwarding the messages to 7726 (spelling out SPAM). The facility works through all four main UK Mobile operators (EE, Vodafone, Telefonica O2 & 3) and has been running for just under a year.

“Nuisance spam messages and phone calls are escalating in the UK," said Neil Cook, CTO of Cloudmark, the firm which provides the spam reporting service. "The raid on spammers by the ICO is a fantastic example of how the GSMA Spam Reporting Service was crucial in delivering the knowledge required to shut down another company taking advantage of subscribers’ trust in mobile messaging services."

The bust follows an announcement by the ICO on Tuesday that a Yorkshire direct marketing firm and a Devon PPI claims company were told they face fines totalling £140,000 for breaching electronic marketing rules. The companies were linked to thousands of nuisance marketing calls that resulted in complaints to the ICO and the Telephone Preference Service. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
One HUNDRED FAMOUS LADIES exposed NUDE online
Celebrity women victimised as Apple iCloud accounts reportedly popped
Rubbish WPS config sees WiFi router keys popped in seconds
Another day, another way in to your home router
Goog says patch⁵⁰ your Chrome
64-bit browser loads cat vids FIFTEEN PERCENT faster!
NZ Justice Minister scalped as hacker leaks emails
Grab your popcorn: Subterfuge and slur disrupts election run up
HP: NORKS' cyber spying efforts actually a credible cyberthreat
'Sophisticated' spies, DIY tech and a TROLL ARMY – report
NIST to sysadmins: clean up your SSH mess
Too many keys, too badly managed
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
Researchers camouflage haxxor traps with fake application traffic
Honeypots sweetened to resemble actual workloads, complete with 'secure' logins
Attack flogged through shiny-clicky social media buttons
66,000 users popped by malicious Flash fudging add-on
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.