Feeds

Disgruntled TSA data analyst sentenced for sabotage attempt

50 ways to leave your employer

Boost IT visibility and business value

A former data analyst for the Transportation Security Administration was sentenced to two years in prison for planting code in a terrorist screening database server after he was told his position was going to be eliminated.

Douglas James Duchak, 46, received the sentence on Tuesday after admitting he planted the sabotage code in the terrorist screening database on October 23, 2009, eight days after supervisors told him his position would be terminated at the end of the month. The code was set to disable the TSA's system for vetting individuals given access to sensitive information and secure areas of airports on November 3 of that year by overwriting a crucial computer file.

The employee of government contractor InfoZen, who had 25 years of experience in information systems, tried to cover his tracks by logging on to the workstation of an employee who was assuming Duchak's responsibilities. Using the fellow employee's credentials, Duchak copied the code onto the employee's machine.

Video surveillance in the secure area of the TSA's Colorado Springs Operations Center captured Duchak planting the code after hours. A subsequent investigation caught the code before it could disrupt operations. The TSA spent $85,539 responding to the offense.

In October, Duchak pleaded guilty to one count of intentionally trying to damage a protected computer, a charge that carries a maximum penalty of up to 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. He was also ordered to pay restitution of $60,587 for repairs to the TSA system. He will be required to undergo mental health treatment.

In going after the TSA, Duchak joins a long roster of IT workers accused of abusing their access to sensitive systems to exact revenge on employers. You can find similar tales in the related stories section that immediately follows. ®

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft: We plan to CLEAN UP this here Windows Store town
Paid-for apps that provide free downloads? Really
Snowden on NSA's MonsterMind TERROR: It may trigger cyberwar
Plus: Syria's internet going down? That was a US cock-up
Who needs hackers? 'Password1' opens a third of all biz doors
GPU-powered pen test yields more bad news about defences and passwords
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
Hear ye, young cyber warriors of the realm: GCHQ wants you
Get involved, get a job and then never discuss work ever again
Chinese hackers spied on investigators of Flight MH370 - report
Classified data on flight's disappearance pinched
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?