Feeds

Hosted security: necessary, evil or necessary evil?

Let us know your thoughts

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

High performance access to file storage

Mini Poll From previous conversations with Reg readers, we know that security is something that is often best left to others – many organisations lack either the expertise or the time to really do justice to securing their IT systems. One possible answer is to get others to manage it – for example, by using hosted security services from third parties.

But do such facilities actually deal with the issues, and what guides the decision making between keeping security capabilities in house, versus using their hosted equivalents? What’s your take – and would you have any guidance for others? Put the kettle on and you’ll have finished our poll before you even settle down for that cuppa. As ever, we’ll be feeding back the results sharpish.

READER POLL: HOSTED SECURITY SERVICES

1. To what extent do you use the following security solutions within your organisation?

  Full coherent solution Piecemeal approach, but fully covered Piecemeal & patchy Little or no coverage
Antivirus
Antispam
Anti-spyware
Filtering against malicious content threats(inbound/outbound)
Data leak/loss prevention
Other (please specify)

2. Where do such security solutions reside in your organisation?

  Antivirus Antispam Anti-spyware Filtering malicious content (inbound/outbound) Data leak/loss prevention
Desktop
Server software (extension of or option to existing app)
Server software (dedicated application)
Appliances
Hosted solutions (subscribed to independently)
Hosted solutions (bundled with another service)
Other (please specify)

3. If you were to look ahead 2 years where do you think these security solutions will reside?

  Antivirus Antispam Anti-spyware Filtering malicious content (inbound/outbound) Data leak/loss prevention
Desktop
Server software (extension of or option to existing app)
Server software (dedicated application)
Appliances
Hosted solutions (subscribed to independently)
Hosted solutions (bundled with another service)
Other (please specify)

4. Do you have an explicit multi-level security strategy (i.e. protection at desktop, server, edge of network, hosted etc)?

Yes, explicitly designed and implemented
No, but we have accumulated solutions at different tiers
Generally have protection in one place only
Unsure

5. How important are the following considerations when making decisions about security solutions?

  Very Important
5
 
4
 
3
 
2
Not at all important
1
 
N/A
Overhead of kit required
Configurability/customisation
Performance (physical)
Performance (functional effectiveness)
Scalability
Specific compliance requirements
Initial cost to implement
Ability for third party to manage
Modern or future proof
Fit with existing environment
Ease of administration
Ease of upgrade
Physical space and/or power requirements
Ongoing maintenance/support/subscription costs
Other (please specify)

6. Which of the following challenges have you experienced or are you currently experiencing with respect to your existing security environment?

  Major Challenge
5
 
4
 
3
 
2
Not a challenge at all
1
Past challenge - already dealt with
Keeping skill sets and knowledge up to date
Integrating hosted security services with in-house capability
Difficulties maintaining a single point of management control
Difficulties monitoring & managing for threats
Patch management challenges with user desktops
Patch management challenges with server infrastructure
Keeping security equipment up to date with the latest patterns
Difficulties establishing relevant content filtering rules
Getting the necessary funding
Other (please specify)

7. Finally, if you had a piece of advice to offer on choosing security solutions what would it be?

 

BEFORE YOU GO

8. Approximately how large is your organisation (worldwide) in terms of employees?

Less than 10 employees
10 to 50 employees
50 to 250 employees
250 to 1,000 employees
1,000 to 5,000 employees
5,000 to 10,000 employees
Over 10,000 employees

9. Which of the following best describes your organisation?

Energy & Utilities
Financial Services
Healthcare
Hi-Tech
Manufacturing
Oil & Gas
Pharmaceuticals
Central/Local Government
Retail & wholesale
Professional services
Telecommunications
Travel & Transportation
Other (please specify)

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts
Bloke behind the cockup says not enough people are helping crucial crypto project
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released
File under 'this is going to hurt you more than it hurts me'
Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker
Natter-board tells middle-class Britain to purée its passwords
Experian subsidiary faces MEGA-PROBE for 'selling consumer data to fraudster'
US attorneys general roll up sleeves, snap on gloves
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.