Feeds

Conficker Autoplay ruse gets teeth into Windows 7

VXers still ahead of the game

Build a business case: developing custom apps

Social engineering autoplay tricks work on early versions of Windows 7 as well as Vista, according to tests by security researchers.

AutoPlay trickery

As well as spreading by exploiting a weeks-old Microsoft vulnerability, the Conficker (Downadup) worm attempts to spread across network shares and to infect removable drives, using a special malformed autorun.inf file.

The use of a clever social engineering ruse means that users plugging an infected drive (such as a USB drive) into a Windows Vista machine might well be lulled into the idea they are clicking on a link that simply opens a folder, rather than actually running the worm's viral payload.

The same trick, first noticed by researchers at the Internet Storm Centre on Vista, also works on beta versions of Windows 7, researchers at F-secure have discovered.

Windows 7 is still in development, so there might still be time to modify how AutoPlay works in order to limit the scope for social engineering attacks. Conficker will surely not be unique in exploiting the ruse to trick users, so a change would surely be welcome. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Scale data protection with your virtual environment
To scale at the rate of virtualization growth, data protection solutions need to adopt new capabilities and simplify current features.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?