Feeds

Mitnick to exploit hackers for $500 a pop

Fame and glory awaits

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

Kevin Mitnick has been commissioned to pen another book on the art of hacking and wants you to do the grunt research work for him.

America's "most-wanted" computer outlaw, who spent five years in the clink, is calling on fellow Net naughties to submit stories of their exploits for inclusion in a book tentatively titled The Art of Intrusion. Mitnick is offering up a paltry 500 bones to the hacker that supplies 'the most provocative' story of deception and network intrusion. The lucky winner will also receive a copy of Mitnick's first book The Art of Deception signed by no less than Mitnick himself. What a treat!

So why doesn't Mitnick just regale the hungry public with stories of his own fantastic exploits and then sign a book for himself?

"My plea agreement (with the Feds) restricts me from telling stories of my own hacks until January 2010, which is why I'm looking for stories from people like you," Mitnick writes on his Web site.

"I guarantee to absolutely protect your identity (remember, I did NOT cooperate with law enforcement during their prosecution of me); if you prefer, you and I will arrange our conversation so that I don't know who you are. Unless you ask that your real name be used, I'll tell your story told under an alias name of your choice. Of course, I will have to somehow verify the accuracy of your story prior to publishing it in the book."

Is $500 enough to endure a painful verification process with Mitnick, especially considering a spot in his book may raise the interest of the Feds? Probably not. Some hackers, however, do have a strong lust for publicity and riding on Mitnick's coattails would be the perfect way to satiate this need.

But don't think it will be easy to win this sexy hack contest. We'll be sure to submit our own story about the time we used a bag of peanuts to coax an elephant to carry a Cobalt Qube into Intel's Oregon chip design HQ. Once in the engineers' good graces, the beast managed to give El Reg direct access to future Itanic designs. Strangely, the spec sheets were blank.

Think you can beat that? Shoot Kevin a line here

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
Goog says patch⁵⁰ your Chrome
64-bit browser loads cat vids FIFTEEN PERCENT faster!
Chinese hackers spied on investigators of Flight MH370 - report
Classified data on flight's disappearance pinched
KER-CHING! CryptoWall ransomware scam rakes in $1 MEEELLION
Anatomy of the net's most destructive ransomware threat
NIST to sysadmins: clean up your SSH mess
Too many keys, too badly managed
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
Researchers camouflage haxxor traps with fake application traffic
Honeypots sweetened to resemble actual workloads, complete with 'secure' logins
prev story

Whitepapers

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup
Learn why inSync received the highest overall rating from Druva and is the top choice for the mobile workforce.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.