Feeds

Two Brits charged with releasing TK worm

Conspiracy to crack

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

Two British men were charged on Monday with conspiring to take over computers using malicious code.

Jordan Bradley, 20, of Bates Avenue, Darlington, and Andrew Harvey, 22, of Scardale Way, Durham, are believed by the National High Tech Crime Unit (NHTCU) to be members of an underground cracking group called the "Thr34t-Krew" who launched the TK Worm (AKA Troj/TKBot-A) sometime before February this year.

The Trojan horse code attempts to exploit a vulnerability involving Microsoft's IIS Web Server software to break into vulnerable sites and give up their control to crackers. Microsoft released a patch for this vulnerability in October 2000 (see advisory here).

The TK worm allowed infected computers to be controlled over an IRC channel. A variety of actions, from scanning other computers for vulnerabilities to starting DDoS attacks on other computers and Web sites, could be initiated from infected hosts.

The worm caused disruption and damage to computer systems in the UK and elsewhere estimated at £5.5 million, according to statements by investigators made earlier this year.

Detectives at the National High Tech Crime Unit first quizzed the pair in February, following police raids in the UK and US aimed at dismantling the Thr34t-Krew. Bradley and Harvey were subsequently released on bail pending further inquiries, which ultimately led to charges against the duo this week.

They are charged with conspiring together and with others between January 1 2002 and February 6 2003 to "effect unauthorised modifications to the contents of computers with the intent to impair the operation of those computers, contrary to Section 1 of the Criminal Law Act 1977," according to a brief NHTCU statement of the case.

Bradley and Harvey are due to appear at Consett Magistrates Court on 18 September. ®

Related Stories

US and UK arrests in computer worm probe
UK police release TK worm suspects
NY Times hacker surrenders, is released
FBI arrests Blaster suspect
Parson not dumbest virus writer ever, shock!
Feds sexed up case - Blaster suspect
Welsh virus writer loses appeal

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Snowden on NSA's MonsterMind TERROR: It may trigger cyberwar
Plus: Syria's internet going down? That was a US cock-up
Who needs hackers? 'Password1' opens a third of all biz doors
GPU-powered pen test yields more bad news about defences and passwords
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Germany 'accidentally' snooped on John Kerry and Hillary Clinton
Dragnet surveillance picks up EVERYTHING, USA, m'kay?
Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code
Two-factor auth enabled for Kernel.org repositories
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.