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WPA wars resume over WinXP SP1 beta

First workaround turns up bang on schedule

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Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Here we go again? Shortly after the beta of WinXP Service Pack 1 was released, locking out installations using leaked activation keys, a workaround with what appears to be a replacement key began circulating on IRC. We can therefore look forward to a repeat of the Windows Product Activation wars that were waged during the original XP beta, as crack and block alternate until the product actually ships.

At which point, barring the invention of an entirely new and uncrackable system, the final crack will be unveiled. At the moment, the SP1 beta won't install on systems using at least one widely-leaked activation key. The workaround circulating appears to include a replacement key, but given that this could be easily blocked by Microsoft in future builds, its main importance is that it explains a procedure for deactivating the system and entering a new corporate key. Which could even be a genuine one. You never know.

The cracking at this stage has about the same long-term significance as was the case during the XP beta, i.e., none. The beta itself will expire prior to the service pack finally shipping, and in the intervening period, if Microsoft wants to, then a game of block and counter-block will take place.

It's obvious what Microsoft's problem is here, but entirely non-obvious how it can be solved. Workarounds for WPA that allowed pirated retail copies of XP to be used were devised, and similar routines could no doubt be produced for any subsequent protection system Microsoft cared to ship. But sensible software pirates preferred the ease of just using a leaked corporate key, and for as long as corporate keys exist, there will be leaked ones. At the moment, given that key generation systems appear to be able to produce operational keys out of thin air, there don't even need to be leaked ones, but Microsoft will no doubt get a lid on that aspect at some point.

Similarly, although it is conceivable that Microsoft could develop towards having some kind of unique identifier for each installation that stopped pirate copies using Windows Update, this isn't going to work terribly well for as long as corporate customer are able to demand patches and upgrades that they don't have to apply one machine at a time.

Basically, the system as currently shipped doesn't deliver what Microsoft wants, and the company's going to have to figure out a new one or stop wanting it. WPA 2 (which we feel sure the boffins are working on) really has to identify individual PCs, copies of Windows sold at retail, with new pieces of hardware and via corporate licensing schemes, and it's going to have to be able to audit corporate installations without forcing corporate customers to apply updates to individual machines. A rental model would probably deliver, but we keep backing off that one, don't we?

Whatever the future system turns out to be will have to be steered through the privacy minefield, and implemented slowly, stage by stage. So maybe collecting IDs at Windows Update now is just part of the process of getting people used to what's coming. Meanwhile, the WPA wars will at least keep both sides off the streets. ®

Related story:
MS turns up heat on warezed WinXP copies

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