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Random numbers

SK Telecom makes light of random numbers for IoT applications

Quantum random number generators aren't new, but one small enough to provide practical security for Internet of Things applications is interesting. That's what South Korean telco SK Telecom reckons its boffins have created, embedding a full quantum random number generator (QRNG) in a 5x5mm chip. The company's pitch is that …

Qualcomm's neural network SDK made free for all comers

Qualcomm's decided to open up its year-old AI, by making its Neural Processing Engine (NPE) available to all. The Snapdragon NPE first landed last year, with the company pitching capabilities including “scene detection, text recognition, object tracking and avoidance, gesturing, face recognition, and natural language …
smartwatch

Devs shun smartwatch work, gaze longingly at web-only apps again

Software developers have almost no interest in creating applications for wearables or smart TVs, but they're keen on web and hybrid apps, so much so that native-only developers are dwindling. So claims a survey of more than 13,000 developers conducted by Ionic, maker of a hybrid app development framework. "The web is …
Thomas Claburn, 25 Jul 2017

Microsoft ctrl-Zs 'killing' Paint, by which we mean offering naff app through Windows Store

Brushes bristled when Microsoft placed Paint on a list of deprecated features for the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update. Now Redmond is promising fans that Paint won't be splashed into the abyss – just moved elsewhere. A Microsoft spokesperson told The Register that "many of the MS Paint features people know and love" such as " …
Andrew Silver, 25 Jul 2017
An angry mob

Python autocomplete-in-the-cloud tool Kite pushes into projects, gets stabbed with a fork

Kite, a San Francisco-based development tools startup, has managed to alienate developers by quietly altering open-source projects for its benefit. Kite makes a Python programming plugin, called Kite, for various code editors to boost developer productivity through automatic code completion and other enhancements. The company …
Thomas Claburn, 25 Jul 2017
Nerd meditating photo via Shutterstock

Find your happy place: Fedora 26 has landed

Review Fedora 26, released recently, is a welcome update on the already very nice 25. As with Fedora's last couple of releases, there are three major ways to get Fedora 26 – Workstation, Server and Atomic Host. The Workstation release is aimed at desktop users and, by default, will install the GNOME desktop. Server and Atomic Host …

Microsoft hits new low: Threatens to axe classic Paint from Windows 10

Satya Nadella had us all fooled but good with his kinder, gentler, people-empowering Microsoft act. But now we can see the company's reverted to type by threatening to kill venerable graphics app Paint after the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update. A new list of “Features that are removed or deprecated in Windows 10 Fall Creators …
Simon Sharwood, 24 Jul 2017
Photo by Diabluses / Shutterstock

systemd'oh! DNS lib underscore bug bites everyone's favorite init tool, blanks Netflix

A few Penguinistas spent a weekend working out why they can't get through to Netflix from their Linux machines, because when they tried, their DNS lookups failed. The issue emerged July 22, when Gentoo user Dennis Schridde submitted this bug report to the Systemd project. Essentially, he described a failure within systemd- …

Debian patches plenty in new version 9.1

Debian Linux has hit version 9.1. The new release rolls up 26 security fixes that have landed since June. This one, which landed last week, is worth plucking out of the noise, with Debian joining others in patching the Heimdal Kerberos man-in-the-middle bug. There are also fixes in Apache, a bunch of Linux updates, and …

Ten new tech terms I learnt this summer: Do you know them all?

Something for the Weekend, Sir? I'll never forget the day I found my children looking at Spam for the first time. My son was particularly perplexed, asking: "Is that what I think it is?" It was my own fault. I had left the tin on the kitchen counter. Even in his tender years, my tech-friendly tweenager was perfectly familiar with spam. But not Spam. He'd …
Alistair Dabbs, 21 Jul 2017

You can't DevOps everything, kids. Off the shelf kit especially

Comment Hey, psst. Come over here, I have a secret to tell you. My fellow DevOps hoodwinkers would cement-shoe me for saying so, but you don't always need to do the DevOps. In fact, in many cases, it's likely a waste of effort. Let's start walking this way, briskly, now – I think I see some pink and chromatic blue fade-tipped Thought …
Michael Cote, 21 Jul 2017
Footprints sand photo via Shutterstock

The lady (or man) vanishes: The thorny issue of GDPR coding

Europe's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is now less than a year away, coming into effect in May 2018, and any legal or compliance department worth its salary should already have been making waves about what it means for your organisation. As a technology pro, you know that these waves will lap up against the side of …
Danny Bradbury, 21 Jul 2017

Q. What's today's top language? A. Python... no, wait, Java... no, C

Among developers, Python is the most popular programming language, followed by C, Java, C++, and JavaScript; among employers, Java is the most sought after, followed by C, Python, C++, and JavaScript. Or so says the 2017 IEEE Spectrum ranking, published this week. IEEE Spectrum, a publication of the The Institute of …
Thomas Claburn, 21 Jul 2017

Second one this month: Another code bootcamp decamps to graveyard

The Iron Yard, a four-year-old coding bootcamp based in South Carolina, USA, said on Thursday that it is shutting its doors. "In considering the current environment, the board of The Iron Yard has made the difficult decision to cease operations at all campuses after teaching out remaining summer cohorts," the company said on …
Thomas Claburn, 20 Jul 2017

Feature snatcher Microsoft tweaks OneDrive

Neither Apple nor Microsoft has a great history with their cloud graveyards consumer cloud file systems, tripping up users with frequent strategy lurches and abandoning features over the years. Microsoft made small amends this week: by adding, rather than taking away, a feature from OneDrive. OneDrive is the cloud file system …
Andrew Orlowski, 20 Jul 2017

Why can't you install Windows 10 Creators Update on your old Atom netbook? Because Intel stopped loving you

Microsoft has blamed Intel for the sad trail of low-end PCs left out of the Windows 10 Creators Update rollouts. The Redmond giant says its latest flavor of Windows can't support machines powered by Intel's Atom Cloverview processor family because Chipzilla has stopped supporting those chips. Without Intel providing firmware …
Shaun Nichols, 20 Jul 2017

Speaking in Tech: We NEED to do a [insert buzzword] project!

Podcast This week Amy is joined by Ed and Melissa with special guest Michael Coté, director of technical marketing at Pivotal. Together they discuss IoT's turn to stink, more douchebags, AI takeovers, the rise of the content providers and zombies. The details... (00:00) Digital transformation? Use Powerpoint (04:54) Amy's …
Team Register, 19 Jul 2017

SQL Server 2017's first rc lands and – yes! – it runs on Linux

Microsoft's long, gentle embrace of Linux continues with the first release candidate of SQL Server 2017. Microsoft said the early release would land in the middle of this year. Arguably, since this is only the RC1-level release, Microsoft's SQL-Server-on-Linux is running late. There's not much detail on what's in the box, …

Android-ocalypse postponed: Jide withdraws Remix OS from consumer frontline

So Remix OS won’t be “eating the world” after all. Parent company Jide, founded by ex-Googlers, is repositioning itself as an enterprise vendor, and says its Android-for-PCs (which also runs on cheap ARM hardware) will no longer be sold to consumers any more. Jide is also scuppering its hardware fleet. Kickstarter investors …
Andrew Orlowski, 18 Jul 2017

Apache says 'no' to Facebook code libraries

The Apache Foundation has declared that none of its new software projects can include Facebook's booby-trapped BSD-licensed code. The foundation's legal affairs director, Chris Mattmann, said over the weekend that libraries, frameworks and tools covered by Facebook's open-source-ish BSD-plus-Patents license should not be …
Shaun Nichols, 17 Jul 2017
LOL

Three Microsoft Outlook patches unpatched, users left to DIY

Microsoft has withdrawn at least three of the patches released at the end of June and early July, but left it to users to find out for themselves. The three patches – KB 4011042, KB 3191849 and KB 3213654 – fixed the same file-handling bugs in Outlook's 2010, 2013 and 2016 editions. Attachments containing “...” (ellipsis) or …
Penguins surround laptop. Pic by Shutterstock

Linus Torvalds may have damned systemd with faint praise

Linux 4.13 is under way. Linus Torvalds pulled one of his semi-surprises by announcing release candidate one on Saturday, rather than issuing his usual Sunday evening missive. The headline features of the next kernel include support for Intel's forthcoming 10nm Cannonlake CPUs, due later this year, and the 14nm Coffeelake that …
Simon Sharwood, 17 Jul 2017
Sun photo via Shutterstock

Open-source world resurrects Oracle-free Solaris project OmniOS

The open-source community has fought back and resurrected the development of OmniOS – an Oracle-free non-proprietary variant of Solaris, which had been shelved in April. The development of OmniOS, a distribution of Illumos derived from Sun's open-source flavor of Solaris, was killed after five years of work by web applications …
Kat Hall, 13 Jul 2017

Don't panic, but your Bitcoins may just vanish into the ether next month

The community-driven organization overseeing Bitcoin on Wednesday warned that any Bitcoins received after Monday, July 31, 2017 at GMT-0700 may vanish into thin air or be rejected as invalid. Bitcoin.org said that at the end of the month, Bitcoin confirmation scores – a number that represents the difficulty of altering the …
Thomas Claburn, 13 Jul 2017

Set your alarms for 2.40am UTC – so you can watch Unix time hit 1,500,000,000

At 0240 GMT* precisely on Friday, July 14, an epoch-defining moment will happen. And only real nerds – along with Reg readers – will know what that moment is. The Unix epoch will pass its 1.5 billionth second in the small hours. A quick check with everyone's favourite scripting language, Perl, confirms this: $ perl - …
Gareth Corfield, 13 Jul 2017
Empty chairs in an office. Pic by shutterstock

Will the last person at Basho please turn out the lights?

Basho, once a rising star of the NoSQL database world, has faded away to almost nothing, The Register has learned. According to sources, the company, which developed the Riak distributed database, has been shedding engineers for months, and is now operating as a shadow of its former self, as at least one buy-out has fallen …
Rebecca Hill, 13 Jul 2017
Windows 10 Tablet Mode has a full-screen All Apps Start menu

Speaking in Tech: What is a Windows 10 licence worth these days?

Podcast Melissa Gurney is steering the nerdcast this week with co-hosts Ed Saipetch and Peter Smallbone to discuss Microsoft news, iPhone hacks and the shelf life of Kubernetes. The details… (0:00) Sky’s “instant” messenger support (5:55) Ring Floodlight, Android tablets, car wifi (11:33) iPhone exploits too valuable (16:30) …
Team Register, 12 Jul 2017
JavaScript/Node code for Google Assistant

JavaScript spec gets strung out on padding

ECMAScript 2017, the latest edition of the specification upon which JavaScript is based, plugs a gap left by awkward extinction of some Node.js code last year. In March, 2016, as a result of a naming conflict with instant messaging app Kik, developer Azer Koçulu withdrew more than 250 of his modules from NPM, the service Node. …
Thomas Claburn, 12 Jul 2017
Ice, image via Shutterstock

Ubuntu Linux now on Windows Store (for Insiders)

Microsoft finally confirmed that Hell has indeed frozen over – Ubuntu is at long last available from the Windows Store. Canonical's Linux distro is now available for installation on Windows Store on Insider build 16215 and higher. Windows 10 already supports Ubuntu via the Windows Subsystem for Linux, rolled out in the …
Andrew Silver, 11 Jul 2017

Mappy days! Ordnance Survey offers up free map of UK greenery

The Ordnance Survey has launched a free online map of Britain's green spaces with an open dataset for developers to get their hands on. The mapping agency's latest offering pulls together geospatial data to create a map of concrete-free areas across the country – everything from your local park to an allotment. The work …
Rebecca Hill, 11 Jul 2017
Neo The Matrix

Microsoft drops Office 365 for biz. Now it's just Microsoft 365. Word

Microsoft is squishing its major biz products into a single solution called – wait for it – Microsoft 365, CEO Satya Nadella announced at Inspire, Redmond's annual event for businesses that flog its wares. Not a single chair was flung, we can report. Office 365, Windows 10, and enterprise mobility and security, will be peddled …
Andrew Silver, 10 Jul 2017
A grey beard

Multics resurrected: Proto-Unix now runs on Raspberry Pi or x86

Seminal time-sharing OS Multics - the Multiplexed Information and Computing Service - has been resurrected in a new simulator. As The Register reported in 2011, Multics' sprang from MIT's decision to eschew an IBM mainframe, buy one from GE instead and write an OS for the machine. The operating system's source code was …
Simon Sharwood, 10 Jul 2017
GNU logo

Roland McGrath steps down as glibc maintainer after 30 years

Open source luminary Roland McGrath has decided “enough is enough” – after 30 years on the GNU compiler library project. As a teenager in 1987 – working back from the age he gives in his mailing list post, as a 15-year-old, in fact – McGrath began writing glibc, and he reckons that devoting “two thirds of my lifespan so far” …

Banking app startups go TITSUP as payment slurper keels over. Again

A number of banking app startups were forced to shut down their services Thursday after their payment processor fell over for the second time in four months. Customers of UK fintech upstarts Monzo, Revolut, Curve, Loot and Starling Bank were hit with thousands of customer complaints after their connection to the broader …
Kieren McCarthy, 06 Jul 2017

TfL, WTH is my bus? London looks up from its mobile

Updated Londoners are straightening their bowed necks, lowering their sunglasses and blinking into the strong sunlight as they attempt to "look" to see if their buses are coming. It's peak morning commute time in the capital and the live bus arrival service on Transport for London's website, SMS and apps powered by TfL’s API feed has …
Jude Karabus, 06 Jul 2017

Windows Insiders with SD cards turn into OneDrive outsiders

Microsoft has tried to DoS its forum servers, by changing its OneDrive consumer policy to only support cloud backups of NTFS-formatted drives without warning users first. Unsurprisingly, that's lit up the forums with complaints, because people only found out when OneDrive popped up error messages. Windows 10 insiders copped …
Skype

Microsoft boasted it had rebuilt Skype 'from the ground up'. Instead, it should have buried it

Microsoft last month declared that it had rebuilt its Skype app "from the ground up." Those who use the app have been busy tearing it down. Reviews of the Android and iOS versions of the app have been mostly terrible, and those posted to the Windows App Store have not been much better. Chief among the issues is that the …
Thomas Claburn, 05 Jul 2017
A person hiding in a box

Cloud sales shift as enormo Microsoft reorg continues – sources

Microsoft is in the process of squishing more of its various sprawling limbs and partners into a single group. Multiple sources close to the tech giant have told us jobs would be cut during the upcoming revamp, although they could not name a number. Our sources are expecting a shift in the org chart of the tech behemoth, which …
Andrew Silver, 03 Jul 2017
linux_tux_cloud_648

Linux 4.12 kernel lands: 'Go forth and use it' quoth Linus Torvalds

As anticipated last week, version 4.12 of the Linux kernel landed Sunday amid a storm of … well, placidity, as it happens. Linus Torvald's release announcement is suitably low-key for something he expected to land without fuss. “Things were quite calm this week, so I really didn't have any real reason to delay the 4.12 release …

Four Brits cuffed in multimillion-quid Windows tech support call scam probe

Four Britons have been arrested on suspicion of helping organise fraudulent telephone support scam calls that caused “hundreds of millions of pounds” of losses worldwide. The City of London police force – working with forces in Surrey and the UK northeast as part of “Operation Thistle” – collared the four alleged mischief- …
Gareth Corfield, 28 Jun 2017

Rackspace shoves Splunk in its data trunk

Managed cloud provider Rackspace has announced it is using Splunk to power its decision analytics engine - and plans to use the software provider’s machine learning tool next. The deal, revealed today, sees Rackspace leveraging Splunk’s Enterprise and Enterprise Security across all its business processes, including business …
Rebecca Hill, 28 Jun 2017
Windows XP Professional. Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corporation

Met Police laggards still have 18,000 Windows XP machines in use

Thousands of Metropolitan Police computers are still running Windows XP more than a year after the force promised to upgrade them, mayor Sadiq Khan has admitted in response to a Greater London Assembly question. Moreover, just eight police machines in the UK capital are running Windows 10, the latest version of the operating …
Gareth Corfield, 28 Jun 2017

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