Articles about w3c

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Go away, kid, you bother me: Apple, Google, Microsoft, Mozilla kick W3C nerds to the curb

The organization that tries to advance web technology standards – the World Wide Web Consortium or W3C – has run into a roadblock: Apple, Google, Microsoft, and Mozilla. Earlier this week, the four major browser makers expressed dissatisfaction with the W3C's DOM 4.1 specification, which defines a variety of new capabilities …
Thomas Claburn, 13 Apr 2018
passcode

No password? No worries! Two new standards aim to make logins an API experience

A pair of authentication standards published this week have received endorsement from Mozilla, Microsoft and Google: the WebAuthn API, and the FIDO Alliance's Client-to-Authenticator Protocol. The aim of WebAuthn and CTAP is to offer an authentication primitive that doesn't rely on server-stored passwords, since a user's …
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Gotta have standards? Security boffins not API about bloated browsers

+Comment The W3C introduces API standards that end up mostly unused, doing nothing more than loading up the code base with vulnerabilities. That's the conclusion of a paper by University of Illinois, Chicago researchers to be presented next week at the ACM's Conference on Computer and Communications Security in Dallas. Chrome 56 …
data leakage

Another W3C API exposing users to browser snitching

Yet another W3C API can be turned against the user, privacy boffin Lukasz Olejnik has warned – this time, it's in how browsers store and check credit card data. As is so often the case, a feature created for convenience can be abused in implementation. To save users from the tedious task of entering the 16 characters of their …

DRM now a formal Web recommendation after protest vote fails

Anti-piracy and anti-copying protections are now formally part of the World Wide Web after an effort to vote down content controls at the WWW's standards body failed. The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) has been embroiled in controversy for five years over the introduction of the Encrypted Media Extensions (EME) specification …
Kieren McCarthy, 18 Sep 2017
Cory Doctorow

Don't listen to the doomsayers – DRM is headed for the historical dustbin, says Doctorow

Interview In 2015, writer and activist Cory Doctorow told the DEF CON hacking conference that he was rejoining the EFF on a new campaign to eliminate digital rights management regulations by 2025. The campaign got off to an interesting start. Legal cases against the rights of farmers to repair their own tractors are being fought by John …
Iain Thomson, 29 Apr 2017
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Ambient light sensors can steal data, says security researcher

Security researcher Lukasz Olejnik says it is possible to slurp sensitive data with the ambient light sensors installed in many smartphones and laptops. The sensors are there so that devices can automatically change the brightness of screens, a handy trick that save scrambles to change settings. But Olejnik says such sensors …
Simon Sharwood, 20 Apr 2017

It's happening! It's happening! W3C erects DRM as web standard

The World Wide Web Consortium has formally put forward highly controversial digital rights management as a new web standard. Dubbed Encrypted Media Extensions (EME), this anti-piracy mechanism was crafted by engineers from Google, Microsoft, and Netflix, and has been in development for some time. The DRM is supposed to thwart …
Kieren McCarthy, 22 Mar 2017

Sir Tim Berners-Lee refuses to be King Canute, approves DRM as Web standard

Sir Tim Berners-Lee has controversially decided to back the introduction of digital rights management – aka anti-piracy and anti-copying mechanisms – as a Web standard. Writing in a blog post last week, the director of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) argued that to stand in the way of the new Encrypted Media Extensions ( …
Shouting match

WTF is up with the W3C, DRM and security bods threatened – we explain

Analysis A lengthy battle over the inclusion of digital rights management as a Web standard is coming to a head, with a set of new guidelines planned for early March. Those guidelines will include the latest attempt at compromise between pragmatists and idealists over how to allow control of content online without undermining the …
Kieren McCarthy, 13 Feb 2017

Uber is watching your smartphone's battery charge

Browser authors are abandoning the invasive Battery API W3C specification, but not everybody's got the memo: Uber, for example, still watches battery status. The not-an-employer, not-a-taxi-company's app checks battery status and remaining battery, with the explanation that the feature is used for fraud detection. The …
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Apple, Mozilla kill API to deplete W3C battery-snitching standard

Apple and Mozilla are leading the charge away from a W3C standard, because it's too much of a privacy risk. The Register reported the battery-snitching capability in August 2015. The W3C's idea was that if HTML included properties to look at the state of user's batteries, it could de-cruft the Web pages it served if your …
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Beyond iTunes: XML boffins target sheet music

One of the world's oldest and most successful "standards" – so standard in fact that western musical notation is simply called standard notation – does not yet have a standard way to be displayed on the web. But a W3C group formed earlier this year, in the summer of 2015, hopes to change that. The Music Notation Community …
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Microsoft drops Do Not Track default from Internet Explorer

Microsoft has reversed its position on the contentious Do Not Track (DNT) browser feature, saying Internet Explorer will no longer send DNT signals to websites by default. "Put simply, we are updating our approach to DNT to eliminate any misunderstanding about whether our chosen implementation will comply with the W3C standard …

W3C recommends Pointer Events standard – but it's a touchy subject. Right, Apple?

Comment The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) has published the Pointer Events standard as a recommendation, but its future is in doubt as Apple and Google are refusing to implement it. The purpose of Pointer Events is to handle input from pointers – which might be touch or pen rather than mouse – which is increasingly important in a …
Tim Anderson, 25 Feb 2015
X-ray image showing vibrator in passenger's luggage

W3C turns BROWSERS into VIBRATORS

Web wonks at the W3C have issued a new Recommendation that gives browsers control of vibrators. Recommendations are the W3C's polite way of defining standards, so this week's notification that the Vibration API has attained this status means the world now has a standard way to make devices throb, buzz, jitter, oscillate or …
Simon Sharwood, 13 Feb 2015
gandalf

Google bakes W3C malware-buster into Gmail

If an online service offers even the slightest gap through which miscreants can launch an attack, they will do so. It's therefore not surprising that Google feels some extensions to its Gmail service may not be entirely friendly to users. The Chocolate Factory's, response, announced Tuesday, is to adopt the W3C's Content …
Simon Sharwood, 17 Dec 2014
Windows 2.0

Stop coding and clean up your UI, devs, it's World Usability Day

November 13th is World Usability Day, the annual event that urges all and sundry “to ensure that the services and products important to life are easier to access and simpler to use.” The day's raison d'être is promoting good design, so that products and services are easy to use, rather than useless. Physical objects are the …
Simon Sharwood, 13 Nov 2014

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