Articles about ransomware

NHS hosptial photo, by Marbury via Shutterstock

NHS given a lashing for lack of action plan one year since WannaCry

Nearly a year has passed since the unprecedented WannaCry cyber attack and the UK's NHS has yet to agree an action plan, according to a report by MPs. Following the incident last June, which caused 20,000 hospital appointments and operations to be cancelled, a Lessons Learned review was published with 22 recommendations for …
Kat Hall, 18 Apr 2018
Close-up of man undergoing CT scan

Imagine you're having a CT scan and malware alters the radiation levels – it's doable

As memories of last May's WannaCry cyber attack fade, the healthcare sector and Britain's NHS are still deep in learning. According to October's National Audit Office (NAO) report (PDF), 81 NHS Trusts, 603 primary care organisations and 595 GP practices in England and Wales were infected by the malware, with many others in …
John E Dunn, 11 Apr 2018

Company insiders behind 1 in 4 data breaches – study

The admins among you will be unsurprised to discover that, more than a quarter of the time, data breaches across the world originated between the chair and the keyboard of organisation "insiders". And no, we don't mean they clicked on a dodgy link... The latest edition of Verizon's Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR) …
John Leyden, 10 Apr 2018
man peers at mobile/cell with bewildered expression

T-Mobile Austria stores passwords as plain text, Outlook gets message crypto, and more

Roundup While Facebook caught most of the security-related flak this week, there were other infosec stories out there. Here's a summary of stuff happening, beyond what we've already covered. Don't get pwned. Word. Dude Microsoft, which used to be a byword for insecure software until Bill Gates' trustworthy computing memo that turned …
Iain Thomson, 7 Apr 2018

Hackers pwn Baltimore's 911 system?! Quick, someone call 91– doh!

The US city of Baltimore suffered a brief outage on part of its 911 service at the weekend – and hackers are being blamed. The Baltimore Sun reports that a cyber-attack on the city's network forced the emergency service's Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) offline. The CAD system is used by 911 operators to direct first responders …
Shaun Nichols, 27 Mar 2018
Ransomware, photo via Shutterstock

Less than half of paying ransomware targets get their files back

Paying off a ransomware demand is a great way to end up losing both your money and your files. This according a study from security company CyberEdge, which found that for those hit by a ransomware infection the best bet is probably to just restore from a backup. The survey, based on a poll of information security …
Shaun Nichols, 9 Mar 2018

Cryptocurrency miners go nuclear, RSA blunder, Winner back in court, and plenty more

Roundup Here's a quick summary of infosec news from this week, beyond what we've already covered. Cloud security shop Cyren surveyed 500,000 websites over the past four months, and said it saw a 725 per cent increase in the use of surreptitious crypto-coin mining code. The bulk of that code has shown up in the past two months, and it' …
Iain Thomson, 4 Mar 2018
Jigsaw puzzle of a desktop box

Got that itchy GandCrab feeling? Ransomware decryptor offers relief

White hats have released a free decryption tool for GandCrab ransomware, preventing the nasty spreaders of the DIY malware from asking their victims for money. GandCrab has been spreading since January 2018 via malicious advertisements that lead to the RIG exploit kit landing pages or via crafted email messages impersonating …
John Leyden, 28 Feb 2018

Don't worry, Eugene Kaspersky. Acronis is just busting a security move...

Analysis Data protector Acronis is building hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) kit for release in 2019 and developing a security product slated for 2020 – markets in little danger of being under-served. A slide extract from one of its recent presentation decks illustrates the plan: Acronis will build a base using service providers and …
Chris Mellor, 22 Feb 2018

UK names Russia as source of NotPetya, USA follows suit

Updated The United Kingdon's Foreign and Commonwealth Office has formally "attributed the NotPetya cyber-attack to the Russian Government", specifically the nation's military. "The decision to publicly attribute this incident underlines the fact that the UK and its allies will not tolerate malicious cyber activity," said a February- …
Simon Sharwood, 15 Feb 2018
Broken link in chain

The strange case of the data breach that stayed online for a month

A couple of weeks ago Jeff* quit his job at the Singaporean branch of a major enterprise technology vendor that is, if not quite a household name, certainly known to most IT professionals. Not long afterwards he Googled his old work employee ID number and was unpleasantly surprised to see the first result was a link to a …
Jigsaw puzzle of a desktop box

Cryakl ransomware antidote released after servers seized

Free decryption keys for the Cryakl ransomware were released last Friday – the fruit of an ongoing cybercrime investigation. The keys were obtained during an ongoing investigation by Belgian cops, and shared with the No More Ransom project, an industry-led effort to combat the growing scourge of file-encrypting malware. The …
John Leyden, 12 Feb 2018
Woman in hospital (in hospital gown) covers face with hands

On the NHS tech team? Weep at ugly WannaCry post-mortem, smile as Health dept outlines plan

The WannaCry outbreak has forced the UK's national health service to overhaul its crisis planning to put new measures in place to avoid further crippling cyber attacks. A UK Department of Health and Social Care postmortem on the May 2017 WannaCry outbreak, published on Thursday, repeats the findings of previous UK government …
John Leyden, 2 Feb 2018
miner

Good news, everyone: Ransomware declining. Bad news: Miscreants are turning to crypto-mining on infected PCs

For the past few years, ransomware has been a bane of computer users. These software nasties infect PCs, scramble files, and demand payment in cryptocurrency to restore the documents. Those cryptocurrencies are a right faff to get hold of and transfer to miscreants at short notice. And there's no guarantee crooks will hand …
Iain Thomson, 1 Feb 2018

Scammers become the scammed: Ransomware payments diverted with Tor proxy trickery

Cybercriminals are using Tor proxies to divert ransomware payments to their own Bitcoin wallets. Ransomware scammers have long directed victims to payment portals on the Tor network. For those who do not want to or cannot install the Tor browser necessary to pay their ransoms, operators generally direct victims to a Tor proxy …
John Leyden, 30 Jan 2018
A child selling newspapers

Acronis: Ransomware protection! Get yer free ransomware protection!

Acronis has released a free, standalone version of its Acronis Ransomware Protection with AI-based Active Protection tech. It can be used alongside existing backup and antivirus products on Windows systems. The lightweight (20MB) software runs in the background and is said to monitor system processes in real-time to …
Chris Mellor, 26 Jan 2018
Doctor Nick Riviera

Hospital injects $60,000 into crims' coffers to cure malware infection

A US hospital paid extortionists roughly $60,000 to end a ransomware outbreak that forced staff to use pencil-and-paper records. The crooks had infected the network of Hancock Health, in Indiana, with the Samsam software nasty, which scrambled files and demanded payment to recover the documents. The criminals broke in around 9 …
Iain Thomson, 16 Jan 2018
handcuffs

Euro ransomware probe: Five Romanians cuffed

Five people suspected of infecting Windows PCs with ransomware – and extorting money from more than 170 victims in Europe and the US – have been arrested. In the past week, an international crimefighting task force led by Europol collared the quintet in Romania – and searched six homes, seizing a load of computer parts and …
Richard Priday, 21 Dec 2017

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