Articles about mit

Tasmanian fireball

RF pulses from dust collisions could be killing satellites

Space scientists have long known that impacts too small to pierce a craft's skin can still damage the electronics inside, by creating electromagnetic pulses. Why those pulses happen, however, is still not well understood. Alex Fletcher of Boston University and MIT, and Sigrid Close of Stanford University reckon they've cracked …
Privacy

CompSci boffins propose scheme to protect privacy in database searches

From stock searches to map directions, any time a user queries a database, they tell the database owner something valuable. A group of researchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory is offering a way that queries can be made private, by breaking them into pieces and having different (identical) …
Graduate student Seongjun Park holds an example of a new flexible fiber

MIT goes down to the wire: Brain cable pipes electricity, chemicals, light straight into minds

MIT brain boffins have developed a tiny fiber that can carry chemical, electrical, and optical signals back and forth between the brain and an external device, offering an improved path for testing brain functions and interactions. The fiber is 200 micrometers wide, comparable to the width of a human hair. Described in a paper …
Thomas Claburn, 23 Feb 2017

Watch: MIT's terrifying invisible gel robo-eels snatch live fish

Videos Watch out – robots are now fast and strong enough to catch live fish and kick balls underwater, according to a group of engineers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The fancy gizmos aren't like the conventional metallic, rigid droids people often imagine when thinking of robots. These bots are squishy, transparent …
gyroid

MIT brainiacs wrangle 2D graphene into super-strong 3D art homework

Video Graphene is said to be the wonder material of our age, but it’s largely a 2D affair. Now scientists have made 3D structures out of the stuff that will be an engineer’s dream. Since the first atom-thick strips of graphene were produced, the substance has shown remarkable properties, including extraordinary strength and …
Iain Thomson, 12 Jan 2017
Pumpkin, image via Shutterstock

BRAAA-AI-NS, BRAAA-AI-NS! Boffins unleash zombie-obsessed nightmare neural net

AI can learn to speak, drive, play games, and recognise faces – but can it learn to incite fear? Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a set of deep learning algorithms that “spookify” images entered into its Nightmare Machine in time for Halloween. A neural network is fed an input image and is …
Katyanna Quach, 31 Oct 2016
Fusion

US reactor breaks fusion record – then runs out of cash and shuts down

Video In a tale that tells you all you need to know about the parlous state of American science, a fusion reactor has broken plasma-handling records in the last few days before losing its funding. The Alcator C-Mod tokamak nuclear fusion reactor, run for the past 23 years by MIT's Plasma Science and Fusion Center, managed to contain …
Iain Thomson, 17 Oct 2016
IPv4 address stagnation

IPv4 apocalypse means we just can't measure the internet any more

IPv4 address exhaustion is making it harder to measure the size of the Internet, even as IPv6 deployment accelerates. While IPv6 activity doubled in 2015 (to 400 million addresses by year-end), the vast majority of users are still on IPv4 addresses, mostly via dynamic assignment or behind carrier-grade Network Address …
Wi-Fi

MIT brainiacs triple the speed, double the range of Wi-Fi

Video Researchers at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) think they have perfected a system that dramatically improves Wi-Fi connections by eliminating signal interference. Dubbed MegaMIMO 2.0 (multiple-input and multiple-output), the technique uses a processor, a real-time baseband processing system, and …
Iain Thomson, 25 Aug 2016
drawing of live cat and cat skeleton

MIT's chip fires frikkin' laser at qubits

MIT boffins reckon they've cracked one of the more difficult challenges of practical quantum computing – the miniaturisation of components. In a paper at Nature, the Karan Mehta, Colin Bruzewicz, Robert McConnell, Rajeev Ram, Jeremy Sage and John Chiaverini say they've printed an ion trap and optical waveguide together in a …
Pic: Shutterstock

Meet Riffle, the next-gen anonymity network that hopes to trounce Tor

Next week, top eggheads will unveil a new anonymizing internet tool that they claim is snoop-proof and faster and more reliable against attack than Tor. Dubbed Riffle, the system was developed by MIT and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland. It uses the same onion-encryption system as Tor, which wraps …
Iain Thomson, 13 Jul 2016
Boy with a backpack hides his eyes and cries. Pic by Shutterstock

A bad day for DBAs: MIT boffins are replacing you with a mere spreadsheet

MIT boffins reckon they've cracked one of the tough nuts of usability, creating an easy-to-use SQL interface for non-database administrators. The tool, SIEUFERD, has been in gestation since at least 2013 (Oracle mentions it here), but considering the problem it addresses has been around since the 1970s, let's not be harsh …
Super Mario Bros

Take that, Mom! Turns out Super Mario Bros was all about solving complex math problems

Completing a game of Super Mario Brothers is the mathematic equivalent of solving complex mathematical calculations, according to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The prestigious tech university said in a recent study [PDF] that navigating the world's most famous plumber through a single level can require the same …
Shaun Nichols, 1 Jun 2016
SuperTim's bacon bounty sarnie

MIT launches campus lunch bug bounty

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology has joined the growing number of large organisations and agencies to offer a bug bounty. The program is in an experimental phase and is open to current MIT students and affiliates, and includes a limited number of domains. Those submitting severe bugs will have money dropped into MIT …
Darren Pauli, 26 Apr 2016
Ultron

MIT boffins build AI bot that spots '85 per cent' of hacker invasions

Eggheads at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) claim they have trained a machine-learning system to detect 85 per cent of network attacks. To reach that level, the software, dubbed AI2 [PDF], parsed billions of lines of log files, looking for behaviors that indicate either a malware infection …
Iain Thomson, 18 Apr 2016
ruby slippers

Flaw-finding Ruby on Rails bot steams past humans

Boffins at MIT have designed a Ruby on Rails interpreter that can find code flaws much faster than fleshy programmers. Dubbed Space, the software has been tested against 50 popular web applications written in Rails, and found 23 previously undiagnosed security flaws. None of the programs required more than 64 seconds for a …
Iain Thomson, 15 Apr 2016
Gridlock on the Kabul Jalalabad Highway

Big data boffins crunch GPS traces, find altruistic route planning is good for everyone

GPS and navigation systems make it a lot easier to find the most direct way to get where you're going, but with a downside: they funnel everybody onto the same congested route. People who know a city well already know the best response to this: take an alternate route. Navigation systems know about alternate routes as well, …
Doctor Nick Riviera

MIT boffins' code scans your health claims, tunes plans for bosses

A company spun out of MIT's research labs says it has developed analytics software that pores over employees' health insurance claims and tells bosses how to adjust their plans. The software from Benefits Science Technologies (BST) is designed to scan staff claims for patterns of illness, or identify common risks, and then …
Shaun Nichols, 19 Feb 2016

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