Articles about malware

A gamer playing Fortnite

Want to know what all that Fortnite hype is about? Whoa, Android fans – mind how you go

With online gaming hit Fornite set to make its debut on Android, malware writers are already playing on the game's hype to ensnare victims. Multiple reports have emerged of Android malware packages being disguised as the Epic Games multi-player battle royale-style shooting game, and experts want users to exercise caution , and …
Shaun Nichols, 21 Jun 2018

(Cryptographically) sign me up! Android to take bad app checks offline

Google says Android will no longer require an internet connection to check whether applications are legit or potentially malicious. From now on, the Play Store will embed metadata into apps' APKs that will be used to check whether or not the software is authentic, and confirm whether it came through the official Google souk or …
Shaun Nichols, 20 Jun 2018

Not so private eye: Got an Axis network cam? You'll need to patch it, unless you like hackers

Researchers have detailed a string of vulnerabilities that, when exploited in combination, would allow for hundreds of models of internet-linked surveillance cameras to be remotely hijacked. Security biz VDOO said today it privately alerted cam-maker Axis Communications to the seven bugs it found in its gizmos, leading to the …
Shaun Nichols, 18 Jun 2018
Rat sillhouettes - Shutterstock

US-CERT warns of more North Korean malware

The United States Department of Homeland Security's Computer Emergency Response Team (US-CERT) has warned against another malware campaign it says originates from North Korea. In its advisory, US-CERT said the “Typeframe” malware “includes malware descriptions related to HIDDEN COBRA”, the tag applied to a North Korean hacking …

What got breached this week? Ticket portals, DNA sites, and Atlanta's police cameras

Roundup This week brought new charges for Marcus Hutchins, a novel way to sneak malware into archives, and shady hotspots for World Cup fans. There was also plenty of other security bits that didn't quite make the headlines. Here are some of the best. Apple wants to be cert-ain on certs Apple is going to make it harder for sites to …
Shaun Nichols, 9 Jun 2018
analysis

Drupal drisputes dreport of widespread wide-open websites – whoa

Drupal is playing down estimates that more than 100,000 websites are still vulnerable to months-old critical security flaws in its content management system. The developer said Thursday that reports from earlier this week claiming tens of thousands of sites were not patched with version 7.58, and thus were vulnerable to an …
Shaun Nichols, 7 Jun 2018
A sports fan looking at a phone

In World Cup Russia, our Wi-Fi networks will log on to you!

The upcoming soccer World Cup will present no shortage of security dangers for travelers looking to get online in the host cities. Security house Kaspersky Lab said its researchers looked at 32,000 public Wi-Fi hotspots in the 11 Russian cities hosting the World Cup this year and found that one in five are using no protection …
Shaun Nichols, 6 Jun 2018
Young guy facepalms while holding a laptop

Pwn goal: Hackers used the username root, password root for botnet control database login

An IoT botnet has been commandeered by white hats after its controllers used a weak username and password combination for its command-and-control server. Ankit Anubhav, of Newsky Security, said researchers with the company were able to take over the MySQL server used to control the Owari botnet – thanks to its creator leaving …
Shaun Nichols, 6 Jun 2018
Spectre logo jazzed up

A Spectre flaw solution, Cloudflare blips, a bank cyber-heist in Canada, and more in infosec land

Roundup While we were busy chasing SpamCannibals, jailing Yahoo hackers, and blaming North Korea for everything else, there was some interesting security news going on. Let's have a look at some of the stories that didn't quite make Reg headlines. Boffins float a (sort of) fix for Spectre bug A group of researchers from TU Dresden in …
Shaun Nichols, 2 Jun 2018

FBI fingers North Korea for two malware strains

US CERT has issued a Technical Alert that says two strains of malware are tools of the North Korean government. The Alert says that the United States’ Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) “identified IP addresses and other indicators of compromise (IOCs) associated with two families …
Simon Sharwood, 30 May 2018
IT Crowd's Roy:on the phone

FBI to World+Dog: Please, try turning it off and turning it back on

The FBI has reminded the world it wants us to reboot our routers to try and help it identify VPNFilter-affected routers. It first asked for reboots last Wednesday, May 23, in the Department of Justice VPNFilter media release, but on Friday added a stand-alone public service announcement emphasising its "IT Crowd" strategy. …

Starbucks site slurped, Z-Wave locks clocked, mad Mac Monero mining malware and much more

Roundup While this week was dominated by news of a new Spectre variant, the VPNFilter botnet, and TalkTalk's badbad routersrouters, plenty of other stories popped up. Here are a handful of security happenings that you may have missed. Wireless Z-Wave smart-locks, home IoT devices menaced Wireless gadgets, such as home smart locks, …
Shaun Nichols, 26 May 2018
FBI

FBI agents take aim at VPNFilter botnet, point finger at Russia, yell 'national security threat'

The FBI says it is taking steps to stop the spread of the VPNFilter malware and botnet, warning that it's a national security issue. The bureau's offensive includes seizing a domain believed to have been used as part of the command and control structure for VPNFilter's 500,000-strong network of infected routers and storage …
Shaun Nichols, 24 May 2018
Putin

Advanced VPNFilter malware menacing routers worldwide

A newly-disclosed malware infection has compromised more than 500,000 home and small office routers and NAS boxes. Researchers with Cisco Talos say the malware, dubbed VPNFilter, has been spreading around the globe, but appears to primarily be largely targeting machines in the Ukraine. wifi Wish you could log into someone's …
Shaun Nichols, 23 May 2018
malware

DOJ convicts second bloke for helping malware go undetected

The US Federal government has got its second conviction in the dismantling of a service that helped malware writers get around security software. A jury in the Eastern Virginia District Court convicted 37 year-old Ruslan Bondars, on charges of computer intrusion, conspiracy to commit wire fraud, and conspiracy to violate the …
Shaun Nichols, 17 May 2018

Ubuntu sends crypto-mining apps out of its store and into a tomb

Admins of the Ubuntu Store have pulled all apps from a developer who signed himself "Nicholas Tomb", and from his e-mail signature apparently wanted to crypto-mine himself into a Ferrari. Mr Tomb's "2048buntu" and "Hextris" applications are now absent from the store, with their removal sparked by a GitHub comment about the …
Hammer and hardhat, image via Shutterstock

Rowhammer strikes networks, Bolton strikes security jobs, and Nigel Thornberry strikes Chrome, and more

Roundup Here's a roundup of everything that's happened in the world of infosec this week, beyond what we've already covered. 7Zip gets 7Ripped Researchers have poked a hole in the 7-Zip archiving tool, and you'll want to update the software as soon as possible. The bug, discovered by researcher landave, allows remote code execution …
Shaun Nichols, 12 May 2018
zombie_648

That Drupal bug you were told to patch weeks ago? Cryptominers hope you haven't bothered

A set of high-severity vulnerabilities in Drupal that were disclosed last month are now the target of widespread attacks by a malware campaign. Researcher Troy Mursch of Bad Packets Report has spotted hundreds of compromised Drupal sites being used to host "cryptojacking" malware that uses the CPUs of visitors to mine …
Shaun Nichols, 7 May 2018

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