Articles about law enforcement

Nuh-uh, Google, you WILL hand over emails stored on foreign servers, says US judge

Google has been ordered by a US court to cough up people's private Gmail messages stored overseas – because if that information can be viewed stateside, it is subject to American search warrants, apparently. During a hearing on Wednesday in California, magistrate judge Laurel Beeler rejected [PDF] the advertising giant's …
Shaun Nichols, 20 Apr 2017
Money laundering

178 arrested in pan-European money mule crackdown

A pan-European crackdown has resulted in the arrest of 178 suspected money mules. Across Europe, 580 people were identified as suspects. National law enforcement agencies last week interviewed 380 suspects collectively implicated in losses amounting to €23m. After malware or phishing is used to obtain the login credentials of …
John Leyden, 22 Nov 2016

Twitter yanks data feeding tube out of police surveillance biz

Updated Twitter has suspended its commercial relationship with a company called Geofeedia – which provides social media data to law enforcement agencies so that they can identify potential miscreants. The social media company announced the change through its Policy account on Tuesday morning following the publication of a report by …
Thomas Claburn, 11 Oct 2016
Police search

Your comms metadata is super-revealing but the law doesn't protect it

America's legal world needs to rethink what it considers people's private information so it can get a grip on today's spying techniques. Stemming from 1970s telephone laws, communications metadata – which details who you talk to, when and where etc – is considered by the courts to be separate from the actual contents of your …
Shaun Nichols, 8 Jun 2016
warrant

Get outta here, officer, you don't need a warrant to track people by their phones – appeals court

A US Court of Appeals has ruled that police do not need a warrant to track the whereabouts of a person's mobile phone. The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled [PDF] that police in Baltimore did not violate the Fourth Amendment rights of two suspected robbers when they pulled the phone location data of the men from their …
Shaun Nichols, 31 May 2016

Cops deploy StingRay anti-terror tech against $50 chicken-wing thief

Police in Maryland, US, used controversial cellphone-tracking technology intended only for the most serious crimes to track down a man who stole $50 of chicken wings. Police in Annapolis – an hour's drive from the heart of government in Washington DC – used a StingRay cell tower simulator in an effort to find the location of a …
Handcuffs

US cop goes war-driving to find stolen gear by MAC address

Correction Be careful with your Wi-Fi things' MAC addresses: an Iowa cop wants to sniff hardware addresses to turn up stolen goods. In a move that opens up a whole new world of "swatting," Iowa City's The Gazette reports that city officer David Schwindt has created software to go war-driving for MAC addresses. He calls the software L8NT …
Close-up of a woman's lips, slightly pixelated as if on a CRT TV

Keep snapping selfies, says Snapchat: Cops NEVER ask us for 'em

Images sent via self-destructing selfie service Snapchat may not disappear as reliably as it once advertised, but it turns out that if you want to post incriminating messages without them getting snooped by authorities, Snapchat is still a pretty good place to do it. That's based on the firm's first-ever transparency report, …

NSW premier pitches 'digital licence' as election stunt

In the throes of an election campaign, the NSW Government has hit upon a way to guarantee that police can require people to unlock their phones: that's where Premier Mike Baird wants your driver's license to be. Pitched as a money-saving measure because today's printed-plastic licences cost tens of millions of dollars, the …
The North Korean computer system

FBI boss: Sony hack was DEFINITELY North Korea, haters gonna hate

The director of the FBI has defended his bureau's claim that the hacking attack against Sony Pictures was the work of the North Korean government – saying skeptics "don't have the facts that I have." Speaking at a cybersecurity conference at Fordham University in New York City on Wednesday, FBI boss James Comey said he has " …

Tor pedo torpedoed: Ex-US cybersecurity guru jailed for 25 years in abuse pics sting

A former US government cybersecurity official who was arrested in 2013 on charges of participating in an online pedophile ring has been sentenced to 25 years in prison. Timothy DeFoggi, who at the time of his arrest was acting director of cybersecurity for the Department of Health and Human Services, is the sixth person to be …
Kim Dotcom at the NZ parliamentary hearing

New Zealand Supreme Court says Kim Dotcom search warrants were legal

File-sharing kingpin and self-described pauper Kim Dotcom will need to cough up another NZ$35,000 ($26,900) after losing the latest round of his long-running legal battle before the country's Supreme Court. The sum will go to cover the New Zealand government's costs to defend warrants that were issued for searches of …
Neil McAllister, 23 Dec 2014

Home Office: Fancy flogging us some SECRET SPY GEAR?

The Home Office is seeking suppliers for a £20m contract for a "bespoke tracking and surveillance system" for all law enforcement agencies. The tender for surveillance, security systems and devices also includes software "to meet the specific and unique operational requirements of a covert surveillance systems." Suppliers …
Kat Hall, 27 Nov 2014
FBI badge and gun

TOR users become FBI's No.1 hacking target after legal power grab

The FBI wants greater authority to hack overseas computers, according to a law professor. A Department of Justice proposal to amend Rule 41 of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure would make it easier for domestic law enforcement to hack into the computers of people attempting to protect their anonymity on the internet. …
John Leyden, 19 Sep 2014
gavel_judgment_channel

Microsoft tells judge: Hold us in contempt of court, we're NOT giving user emails to US govt

At Microsoft's own request, a judge has held the software giant in contempt of court for failing to comply with an order to give US authorities access to customer emails housed in a data center in Dublin, Ireland. Redmond's request was made jointly with government prosecutors, with the aim of expediting its appeal of the July …
Neil McAllister, 10 Sep 2014
Face recognition

Face-recog tech spots US fugitive wanted for 14 years ... from a photo

The US Federal Bureau of Investigations says it has captured a fugitive who has been wanted for the last 14 years on child sex abuse and kidnapping charges, and it credits modern face recognition technology for the arrest. The accused, Neil Stammer, originally of New Mexico, was arrested in 1999 but released on bond pending …
Neil McAllister, 14 Aug 2014
security fail

Spy platform zero day exposes cops' wiretapped calls

National security boosters have just taken a kick to the ego, with revelations that hackers can access exactly the kind of wiretap kit they believe should be deployed in every ISP and telco around the world. The zero-day that's turned up in kit from New Jersey outfit NICE would give attackers access to wiretapped voice …
Darren Pauli, 29 May 2014
Snapchat logo

EFF blows Snapchat a raspberry in gov't surveillance report

The Electronic Frontier Foundation has issued its fourth annual "Who Has Your Back?" report, ranking internet companies on how they respond to government data requests; Snapchat, Amazon, and AT&T sit at the bottom of the ratings. The report rates 26 internet companies and assigns each as many as six stars, with each star …
Neil McAllister, 15 May 2014

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