Bloke sues Microsoft: Give me $600m – or my copy of Windows 7 back

Frank Dickman is a hell of a super hero name, we gotta say

By Shaun Nichols in San Francisco

Posted in Software, 15th February 2018 06:06 GMT

A fella in the United States is taking Microsoft to court to get Windows 7 put back on his PC.

Frank Dickman, of Albuquerque, New Mexico, filed a lawsuit on Wednesday seeking damages from both Microsoft and CEO Satya Nadella for what were termed "civil rights violations" that occurred when his Asus laptop was automatically updated from Windows 7 to Windows 10.

He seeks either a new copy of Windows 7 or $600m.

(Well, the lawsuit states "$6,000,000,000.00 (six hundred million dollars)" – so take your pick, $6bn or $600m.)

According to the complaint – submitted to the US district court in Denver, Colorado – the trouble for Dickman began when his Asus 54L notebook, which had been shipped with Windows 7, updated to Windows 10 and "became non-functional immediately."

Now, Dickman wants to downgrade from Windows 10 back to Windows 7 via a digital download and activation code from Microsoft. To get it, he says he is willing to sue both Microsoft and Nadella himself.

His lawsuit gives Redmond 30 days to give him the software or pay more than a half a billion in damages from a default judgment.

"The only sensible remedy is for Microsoft Corporation to supply the OEM version of its operating system by download from its website and confirmed by the key code which came with the computer," Dickman's filing read.

"Failure of Microsoft Corporation and its CEO (Satya Nadella) to provide this function within thirty days of the provided summons should yield a payment from the two defendants to the plaintiff of a remedy... of six hundred million dollars."

El Reg asked Microsoft for its response to the filing. A puzzled spokesperson declined to comment.

While Dickman's ...ambitious... litigation may not go very far in a district court, his sentiments are no doubt shared by a number of PC users around the globe, who took exception to Microsoft's over-zealous marketing of Windows 10 updates in the lead-up to and aftermath of its 2015 release.

He is also not alone in wanting to stay with Windows 7, despite the OS being nearly nine years old and less than two years from retirement: Windows 7 retains a sizable market share according to web estimates. ®

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