Data Centre

Networks

D-Link in Pluribus-powered white box play to target enterprise sales

Netvisor gets a crack at the consumer and SME channel in new 54-port switch

By Richard Chirgwin

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D-Link has decided that white-box open networking might just be its ticket out of the consumer and small business ghettos, and into the rich enterprise market.

To that effect, the outfit has linked up with Pluribus, meaning its newly-launched DXS-5000 switch is certified to run Pluribus' Netvisor network operating system.

The product pair will ship together, as a turnkey open networking system, along the way giving Pluribus access to a mass-market channel.

D-Link has chosen the DXS-5000 to take it from 10 Gbps ports to 40 Gbps (there are six 40 Gbps ports as well as 48 at 10 Gbps), a pitch to data centre leaf-spine and top-of-rack applications in addition to campus core applications.

The Open Network Install Environment supports multiple network operating system installs, and was contributed to the Open Compute Project by Cumulus Networks back in 2013.

Netvisor provides the Layer 2/3 foundation with support for VXLAN, embedded telemetry, and support for Pluribus' Adaptive Cloud Fabric (ACF).

DXS-5000 customers have a choice of Netvisor 2.6 licences: either an Enterprise licence with Layer 2/3 services, or the Fabric version which includes ACF and telemetry.

ACF is a peer-to-peer SDN fabric that presents multiple switches as a single operating domain without proprietary protocols or SDN controllers. ®

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