Apple creates face shield for health workers, resists the temptation to call it the 'iMask'

20 million of them coming soon as supply chain muscles flexed

Got Tips? 60 Reg comments
Apple face shield
The Apple Face Shield

Apple has designed a face shield to help health workers stay safer when working around the novel coronavirus.

The Register can't quite believe the company hasn't called it the iMask. The fruity firm does appear to have come up with a pleasing design that uses just three components, can be assembled in moments, and doesn't have overpriced RAM upgrade options because it's being given away.

There's already a support page for the device, complete with assembly instructions and a downloadable video guide [.MOV].

The instructions warn that the device hasn't been tested or qualified to prevent or reduce infection and should not be used in surgery. But with reports that frontline health care workers are struggling to find any protective equipment, good efforts at solutions are welcome.

Apple's Face shield

Another view of the I-can't-believe-it's-not-iMask. Click to enlarge

Apple CEO Tim Cook took to Twitter to say the company's design teams have weighed in to get the project moving, while its supply chain people have worked with suppliers to secure 20 million masks. Cook also said the company has more to offer and will reveal its efforts soon.

Big tech is rallying to support frontline workers and healthcare staff during the crisis. Wipro has opened its office kitchens in Bengaluru to feed migrant workers caught away from home during India's lockdown. Intel and Mozilla have signed the Open COVID pledge, an effort to secure patent rights waivers in the interests of faster research. Clouds have donated compute time and storage resources, while vendors have developed tools for researchers and made their products free to assist with rapid implementation of remote working tools. ®

Sponsored: How to simplify data protection on Amazon Web Services

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR WEEKLY TECH NEWSLETTER


Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2020