Oracle leaves its heart in San Francisco – or it would do if, you know, Oracle had a heart

OpenWorld moving to Vegas, baby: SF now too expensive not to mention the filthy streets, open drug use...

Oracle OpenWorld 2018 in San Francisco

Oracle's massive OpenWorld shindig is relocating from hipster central to the desert, or put another way, from San Francisco to Las Vegas.

The database giant has run its monster show in the city since 1996 but blamed expensive hotels, and "poor street conditions" for its decision. By that, it's probably referring to the south-of-Market and down-town filth, open drug use, and mentally ill homeless people which drove a doctors' convention out of the city.

The OpenWorld event is one of the largest in the city, with some 60,000 people taking over the Moscone Center and closing nearby streets to vehicles. It famously brings traffic chaos but also generous discounts for attendees from local strip joints.

CNBC got hold of an email from the San Francisco Travel Association (SFTA), which claimed feedback from OneWorld attendees was behind the move. The SFTA reckoned the loss would cost San Francisco $64m.

Oracle confirmed to the broadcaster that it had signed a three-year deal with Caesars Forum in Las Vegas, citing the city and its "vast amenities... tailor-made for hosting large-scale events".

San Francisco's hotels are eye-wateringly expensive at the best of times.

The city has long been sharply divided between extremely wealthy, mostly tech-employed residents, and a sizeable and growing homeless population. The administration estimates more than 8,000 people sleep rough every night.

In 2019 attendees were entertained by John Mayer and Flo Rida, as well as hearing all about autonomous cloud infrastructure from company founder Larry Ellison and CEO Safra Catz, of course.

The company runs other events in Asia, Europe and the Middle East.

In contrast, Las Vegas – planet Earth's very own Mos Eisley – has plenty of affordable hotels, the main strip is a 20-minute ride from the airport and as a wretched hive of scum and villainy, Oracle should fit right in. ®

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