Uncle Sam is Huawei out of line with these hacking attacks, patent probes, Chinese mobe maker sighs

Comms giant says camera patent claims are a front for government intrusion

annoyed

Huawei claims, albeit without evidence, the US government has tried to break into its internal computer networks.

The mobile tech giant is also pretty upset about Uncle Sam's ongoing patent theft probes, claiming they are little more than an excuse for American officials to pry into its business.

On Tuesday, the Chinese telecommunications equipment giant emitted a statement blasting the US government for interfering in its operations for political purposes. It also denounced Portuguese inventor Rui Pedro Oliveira's patent infringement claim against Huawei, regarding camera technology as "false," which the Middle Kingdom mobe maker says is designed to "take advantage of the current geopolitical situation."

The statement comes with a list of grievances and accusations from Huawei, including allegations that the government has at least attempted to hack Huawei's networks.

"For the past several months, the US government has been leveraging its political and diplomatic influence to lobby other governments to ban Huawei equipment," Huawei huffed. "Furthermore, it has been using every tool at its disposal – including both judicial and administrative powers, as well as a host of other unscrupulous means – to disrupt the normal business operations of Huawei and its partners."

Patent problems go public

Last week, the Wall Street Journal reported that Huawei was being investigated by America's Department of Justice for allegations of technology theft and illegal hiring practices. One of the alleged infractions being investigated was Oliveira's claim that Huawei had stolen camera technology he had patented and attempted to sell to them in 2014.

With news of the investigations now public, Huawei is wasting no time giving its side of the story, claiming that while they did meet Oliveira, Huawei's US branch had no interest in his camera technology and the product it developed a few years later, the EnVizion360 camera, was substantially different to Oliveira's design.

"Huawei categorically rejects Mr. Oliveira's claims of patent infringement, and has provided detailed documents in support of its stance (see visual comparisons of the two products below as example)," the firm declared.

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Huawei's comparison of camera designs ... Click to enlarge

"Nevertheless, Mr Oliveira proceeded to feed a false narrative to the media in an attempt to tarnish Huawei's reputation. He made further efforts to exert pressure on Huawei through senior government officials, trying to make the company cede to his demands and hand over large sums of money."

Huawei complains of government interference, apparently not ironically

As for Uncle Sam, Huawei says the government is seizing upon the patent claim to further interfere in its business and harass its workers.

huawei

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Among the allegations is that the Feds illegally searched and detained its employees, have at least attempted to snoop on Huawei's internal networks, and have sent officers to "threaten, menace, coerce, entice, and incite both current and former Huawei employees to turn against the company and work for them."

"For the past several months, the US government has been leveraging its political and diplomatic influence to lobby other governments to ban Huawei equipment," Huawei says.

"Furthermore, it has been using every tool at its disposal – including both judicial and administrative powers, as well as a host of other unscrupulous means – to disrupt the normal business operations of Huawei and its partners."

The Justice Department, for its part, is opting to say little on Huawei's allegations.

"As a general matter, we do not confirm or acknowledge the existence of investigations," a department spokesperson told The Register.

"In all matters, our investigative techniques comply with the law and all subjects of investigations enjoy the same rights to due process afforded by our Constitution and safeguarded by an independent judiciary." ®

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