Summer's here, where's Windows 10 19H2? For Microsoft, spring ends whenever the heck it says so stop asking

IF (DateTime.Now > Spring) { WHILE (Windows != Done) Spring++; }

Man browses his tablet and ignores the beach. Photo by shutterstock

Microsoft enlivened an otherwise deadly dull Windows 10 Insider build by revealing the corporation now defines its own seasons.

Other than the appearance of the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) 2 in the recent weeks, the last few builds of Windows 10 20H1, due for release some time next year, have been notable for, er, not much.

We assume the exciting stuff must be happening under the hood.

This week's build 18922 was no different. The gang had tweaked the feedback hub to allow testers to link their feedback to similar whinges. And the language settings had been improved to make it easier to get an overview of languages set for keyboard, speech and websites.

In fact, the Settings page itself received the most love, with the updated header making a reappearance after the Windows team fixed a problem with the OneDrive entry.

The problem, as ever, was this was 20H1 and a preview of the next release of Windows 10, 19H2 has yet to be emitted from the bowels of Redmond. And things are getting a bit tight – based on past form, we would expect a release in October. So getting a preview is becoming critical.

You'd be forgiven for saying "meh" when it comes to 19H2. Enterprises, however, are most definitely interested. The September (or October) updates get 30 months of support. March (or April, or maybe May now) updates only get 18 months.

So, if you're going to pick a Windows 10 for your fleet, and the Long Term Servicing Channel (LTSC) version will get a bit too crusty, then an xH2 is for you. This is particularly important as corporates face the reality of moving armies of Windows 7 machines onto the latest and greatest by the end of this year.

19H2 was supposed to drop, according to Microsoft, by the end of spring. And today, for the Northern Hemisphere, is the beginning of summer.

Microsoft's Brandon LeBlanc, probably weary of the constant stream of "where's 19H2?!" questions finally snapped last night, with the revelation that spring ends whenever the heck Microsoft says it does.

So there you have it. For those concerned that the minions lurking behind the gates of Nadella's Redmond castle have lost touch with reality, you might be right.

In the meantime, please join us in a rewording of a popular song from Mel Brooks' The Producers:

"Springtime for Satya and Microsoft... Winter for Nineteen H 2…" ®




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