Freaky photo flingers face fat fines for flagrant phallus flashing fun

What a d*ck move! Singapore criminalizes unsolicited nude pics

A little wood could soon get you the cane (or at least some time behind bars), thanks to a recently-passed law in Singapore that criminalizes sending unwelcome nude photos.

After what was no doubt a long and hard deliberation the Southeast Asian city-state this week passed a series of legal reforms regarding sex crimes and privacy violations, including a provision that bans men and women from sending others images of their (or another person's) naughty bits without first getting their permission.

The intent, said the government earlier this week, is to stop people harassing others with unwanted nude pictures (ie "dick pics" or the female equivalent.) Officials noted that this will be the first time it has classified this type of unwanted exposure as a criminal offense.

"There has been prevalence of this," the Ministry of Home Affairs said of the todger texting epidemic.

"Persons intentionally send unsolicited pictures of their genitalia over social media or via messaging platforms. That will be criminalized."

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The ministry notes that penalties for the offense could be up to two years in prison and would be doubled if the recipient of the unwanted nudes is under the age of 14.

The law is part of a larger effort by the government to clamp down on digital sex crime. In addition to outlawing unsolicited nudes, the legislation will also increase penalties for the creation and distribution of voyeurism content (ie images and videos produced without the knowledge or consent of the subject) and the distribution of revenge porn.

Distributing revenge porn would carry a maximum of five years hard time in prison, with additional penalties if minors are involved. For voyeurism offenses, the government says miscreants could face not only jail time, but also fines and a caning.

Other laws will impose punishments for people who use deception or misrepresentation to get sex (including anyone who lies about an STD or the use of protective measures like condoms). ®

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