Trend Micro antivirus fails to stop measles carrier rubbing against firm's Ottawa offices

Vaccination GOOD. Spread of easily preventable illness BAD

An oddly specific health warning has confirmed a case of measles in the Canadian capital of Ottawa – and patient zero is believed to have merrily sauntered through the offices of, er, antivirus maker Trend Micro.

The highly infectious viral illness, which by all rights should have been eradicated by now, has been enjoying a renaissance across the developed world thanks to folks' idiocy about vaccinations.

Though the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) jab's connection with autism has been thoroughly dispelled many times, the anti-vaccine movement in North America is still a very real threat to public health.

While there's no indication that this is responsible for the disease's appearance in Ottawa, authorities have a rather precise list of locations the infected individual rubbed themselves up against.

First up is the "lobby, elevator or ground floor" of 40 Hines Road on 26-27 March, from about 10am to 6pm local time then 10am to 3:30pm.

Over the span of a week, the list then moves to a supermarket, then a clinic, then... a hospital emergency department.

If we punch the first address into Google Maps, the location appears to be none other than an office belonging to Taiwanese multinational cybersecurity firm Trend Micro, suggesting that an employee or client may have the nasty.

Trend Micro offices, Ottawa, Canada

40 Hines Road (Google Maps)

Among the firm's many products and services is, of course, antivirus, and if that doesn't get your Morissette meter tingling, what will?

Unfortunately for staff working at the building, Trend Micro's wares will not help here. Ottawa Public Health "advises all individuals who were present at these locations, at the times listed... to check their immunization records or contact their health care provider if they are unsure about their immunization status."

The Register wishes the affected individual a safe and swift recovery and reminds its readers that it's never too late to vaccinate yourself against biological and electronic nasties.

Hat-tip to reader Ed for the headsup. ®

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