JFrog to open freebie central repository for Go fans in the new year

Your code is immutable, and always believed in... 'cause you use Go(Center)

Bookshelf in the British Library basement

Updated Self-proclaimed "Database of DevOps" JFrog is about to fling open the first central repository for Go modules in the form of GoCenter.

Originally developed by Google, the open-source language Go, which celebrated its ninth anniversary last month, has seen impressive growth over the years. It hovers in fifth place in Stack Overflow's 2018 survey of most-loved languages (above the likes of JavaScript) and third in rankings of languages devs most want to learn. Python reigns supreme, of course.

Very popular for developing cloud applications – Docker is written in it – Go lacks a central, public repository for modules. Without an immutable source for code, developers have to repackage their modules and, rightly, eye modules pulled off the 'net with suspicion since the code could easily change without warning.

Enter JFrog's GoCenter, which the Californian outfit will unleash in early 2019.

The company said GoCenter will be a free, open source, public service provided for the Go community. Oh, and if you're using its own repository manager, Artifactory, then GoCenter will be a default remote repo. Millions of Artifactory users will then be able to set up in-house Go repos including modules from GoCenter for internal re-use.

Artifactory is most definitely not a free product, with prices ranging from $2,950 to $29,500 per year, depending on how many of JFrog's toys you need. Artifactory does, however, demonstrate that JFrog knows its stuff when it comes to repository management.

The company is worryingly vague on how contributions of projects to GoCenter will actually work, saying that it "will be a simple and public process, giving full transparency to developers and DevOps teams". We asked for some specifics and will update when we get a response.

JFrog anticipates rapid growth of the library as the community takes advantage of the freebie service, reckoning the repository will soon be home to thousands of modules, including packages for tech such as Kubernetes.

So buy yourself some new Christmas boots. In 2019 you'll be able to fill them with lovely, stable Go code. ®

Updated

JFrog got in touch to let us know, in answer to our question, that GoCenter is full-fat Artifactory running on Google Cloud with microservices automating the submission and availability process. To get submissions in, code must be open source with "license compliance with free and open licenses to be able to distribute the code".

The company naturally leaves the responsibility of the actual quality of the code submitted firmly with the contributor.

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