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Oracle boils Exadata Cloud into an on-premises package

Apparently the world is ready for hybrid-cloud-database-as-a-service, on subscription

Oracle's added a new piece of hardware to its “Oracle Cloud at Customer” offering, in the form of the new Exadata Cloud Machine that runs Oracle databases on-premises with the very same interface as offered in the Exadata Cloud Service.

The Cloud at Customer caper sees Oracle boil down its public cloud experience into hardware to run on-premises. Oracle pitches the products as offering a cloud experience, without all the regulatory uncertainty some organisations feel prevents them from diving into a public cloud. But with the very same interface as its own public cloud, therefore making it easier to do hybrid cloud. There's also a single API for the on-premises and public cloud versions of the service, which should be appreciated by developers.

Cloud at Customer also offers cloud-like payment options. Customers can pay subscription fees for the hardware and database, with a baseline fee and sliding scale of charges depending on usage.

This new device comes in four configurations:

  • Eighth Rack: Containing 2 compute nodes and 3 Exadata Storage Servers.
  • Quarter Rack: Containing 2 compute nodes and 3 Exadata Storage Servers, with each node offering double the storage capacity, more RAM and more available CPU cores than is possible in eighth-rack nodes;
  • Half Rack: Containing 4 compute nodes and 6 Exadata Storage Servers.
  • Full Rack: Containing 8 compute nodes and 12 Exadata Storage Servers.

Big Red recently sent price signals to those who would run its database in other public clouds, by doubling licence fees to run its stuff in AWS. By adding hybrid-cloud-database-as-a-service Oracle's again showing that it aspires to own as much of a customer’s infrastructure stack as it can. Pricing for the new device hasn't been revealed, but Oracle founder Larry Ellison has previously pledged to beat all cloudy comers on price. ®

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