Cartoon brings proper tech-talk to telly

Amazing Gumball character 'bypassed storage controller, decrypted disks, accessed ESXi server cluster'

the amazing world of gumball

Technology on the telly is often made-up rubbish: every CCTV camera in the world is online, progress bars never pause, passwords can be brute-forced in moments and mobile phones never drop out unless faults enhance the dramatic effect. The language used to describe it is worse: the likes of CSI:Cyber routinely make stuff up. And don't get us started on Stephen Fry.

The Register was therefore more than interested to learn that an episode of kids cartoon The Amazing World Of Gumball offered the following verbiage during a recent episode:

Actually, I bypassed the storage controller, tapped directly in to the VNX array head, decrypted the nearline SAS disks, injected the flash drivers into the network's FabricPath before disabling the IDF, routed incoming traffic through a bunch of offshore proxies, accessed the ESXi server cluster in the prime data center, and disabled the inter-VSAN routing on the layer-3

Doubt us? Here's the video.

Youtube Video



Your correspondent confesses to not being an Amazing Gumball admirer, but gathers the words above were intoned by the titular character's nerdy sister who often uses brains to balance her sibling's impetuousness and get them both out of scrapes.

Does this telly-technobabble make sense? The bit about “injected the flash drivers into the network's FabricPath” seems a bit ropey. And if “the IDF” refers to term frequency–inverse document frequency, we're not sure why it gets a mention in this context. “Inter-VSAN routing” however, is a thing.

Another question worth asking is why the cartoon's writers like the EMC Federation so much: ESXi is a VMware product and VNX is an EMC array.

Whatever the reasons, the mere fact that stuff like this makes it into a cartoon means readers can now safely outsource their kids' technical education to the telly. As is proper. ®




Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018