Gone in 60 seconds – SimpliVity's new promise to the admins

ROBO backups propel Omnistack the third

Speed

Converged infrastructure "visionary" SimpliVity today released the third version of its modestly-named OmniStack Data Virtualisation Platform, the code that turns its collections of servers and disks into combined storage and compute rigs.

This time around the emphasis is on ROBO. No, silly, not anthropogenic automata, but Remote Offices and Branch Offices. SimpliVity thinks it has an 'in' there because this time around OmniStack has gained the ability to connect a box in a remote office without local staff having to do much more than plug it in to electricity and Ethernet.

That scenario will probably involve the new entry-level OmniCube CN-1200. We've not been offered specs of the 1200 just yet, but are assured it's very keenly priced.

SimpliVity's schtick is that it doesn't just put storage and compute in a box but also bundles all the other bits of enterprise IT that often find their way into boxes, such as WAN optimisation.

This time around its added file-level backup to the mix, which should get up the nose of the disk backup appliance crowd and the backup software industry.

Network optimisers will also have a new reason to look over their shoulders as SimpliVity is claiming it's trimmed 30 per cent from I/O.

There's also a list of five new promises, including a “60-seconds or less on average for local backup or restore of a 1TB VM” to emphasise the company's belief it makes life easier for sysadmins. If sysadmins even get a look-in.

We won't recite the other promises for fear of falling while doing all of the company's work for it, but suffice to say it's promising to make everyday admin chores consume impressively small slices of time.

The company's plans appear to be working, as it claims a 250 per cent year-over-year sales growth for 2015's second quarter; to have won 700 partners in 61 nations; and to have shipped 2,500 systems since bounding into the market early in 2014.

Its newest venture, revealed last week, is a partnership with Lenovo that the company tells us came about because customers wanted it. It's always nice to make new friends, but SimpliVity now has to juggle Dell – which makes its kit – Lenovo and Cisco. Plenty of other vendors would love to have similar problems. ®


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