Connected Data's Transporter private-cloud-in-a-box hooks up with the office NASties

Nifty little nicher adds filer sync'n'share

storage arrays superimposed on cloudy sky

Connected Data's Transporter stores and shares files over the network like a Dropbox-style private cloud. Now it can hook up with any supported NAS system, thanks to its Network Storage Connector.

Transporter is a peer-to-peer sync'n'share storage device that doesn’t expose files to any public cloud, and thus avoids the need for any subscription fees and other headaches associated with public clouds. There are consumer-level boxes, and four enterprise models:

  • Transporter 15: 8TB capacity (6TB usable) up to 15 users.
  • Transporter 30: 12TB (9TB usable) up to 30 users.
  • Transporter 75: 12TB (10TB usable) up to 75 users.
  • Transporter 150: 24TB (20TB usable) up to 150 users.

Eighty of these systems have been sold in five months of availability. Connected Data’s founder and CEO Geoff Barrall says the company has 40,000 active users with 23PB of storage deployed.

The new Network Storage Connector lets traditional networked storage appliances sync with shared folders on Transporter 75 and 150 devices, giving mobile devices – smartphones, tablets and notebooks – and desktop users access to these files via a Transporter network. You can add easy-to-use sync'n'share functionality to, for example, Dell, EMC, HP, and NetApp boxes this way at a more economical cost than alternatives from those suppliers, says Connected Data.

Active Director integration is included. Data can be replicated to as many remote Transporter sites as required, and local users there get LAN-access speeds to what was originally central site data.

The Network Storage Connector is included at no extra charge with Transporter 75 and 150 purchases, list-priced at $9,999 and $18,998 respectively, and available now. Existing users will receive the functionality via a free firmware upgrade. ®

Sponsored: Technical Overview: Exasol Peek Under the Hood




Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2019