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Google Chocolate Factory

Canada to Google: You can't have your borderless cake and eat it too

Google-watchers young and old will savour the latest twist in the corporation's attempts to avoid laws it doesn't like. It's a landmark judgment in Canada that's unusual in several ways - not least for the argument that Google advanced. The case – Equustek Solutions Inc. v. Jack, presided over by Justice Lauri-Ann Fenlon – was …
Andrew Orlowski, 19 Jun 2014
troll

Luxembourg patent troll suing world+dog

Another patent troll has appeared on the horizon: Enterprise Systems Technologies, armed with a handful of patents originally assigned to Siemens, has taken out the sueball machine-gun and fired off shots at Apple, Samsung, Qualcomm, Amazon, and Audience. The Luxembourg-headquartered company has filed the lawsuits in Delaware. …
blackmail

Nokia paid off extortionist in 2007: Finnish TV

A Finnish broadcaster has revealed that Nokia paid a ransom to keep the app-signing keys of its Symbian operating system secret, in an extortion case dating back to 2007. According to MTV News, the former mobe giant, whose Symbian phones were market leaders back in the day, paid out “millions of Euros” in the extortion. As El …

FBI arrests claims NullCrew hacker in Tennessee takedown

The FBI has arrested a Tennessee man on computer crime charges, claiming he is a key player in the NullCrew hacking squad that attacked businesses and educational institutions from 2012 onwards. Court filings claim Timothy Justin French, 20, is known online as "Orbit", and took part in hacking attacks against two US universities …
Iain Thomson, 17 Jun 2014
Supreme Court Building

Are Facebook rants about harming your wife protected free speech? US Supremes to decide

The US Supreme Court is to decide whether violent threats or images posted on Facebook and other social networks constitute free speech or a criminal act, in the case of a man who made comments about his estranged wife. Anthony Elonis wrote about killing his wife publicly on Facebook and also posted other comments and images …

Apple settles ebook price-fixing damages lawsuit with US states

Apple has settled out of court with the 33 US states and territories that had been seeking up to $840m in damages for its ebook price-fixing shenanigans. The fruity firm, which was found guilty of engaging in the price-fixing conspiracy with five major book publishers in a separate trial, has always maintained its innocence and …
Google_skull

Slippery Google greases up, aims to squirm out of EU privacy grasp

Special Report Google is wriggling desperately to escape new European privacy rules that could force it to take some responsibility for what information it republishes in response to a given search – in particular a search of someone's name. The European Parliament voted in favour of data protection reforms in March, which the EU's press …
Andrew Orlowski, 17 Jun 2014
management regulation1

Facebook didn't infringe Dutch inventor's patents: Jury

Facebook has beaten off a dead Dutch inventor in a lawsuit targeting The Social Network'sTM Timeline, Newsfeed, Groups and Photo Sharing features. At issue in the lawsuit were two patents by Dutch computer scientist Joannes Van Der Meer, who died in 2004, which the licensing litigant Rembrandt Social Media said Facebook had …
management regulation1

Top Canadian court: Cops need warrant to get names from ISPs

Canadian ISPs can no longer simply hand over customer information without a warrant after the country’s Supreme Court ruled that internet users were entitled to a "reasonable" expectation of privacy. The decision means that internet service providers can no longer disclose the names, addresses and phone numbers of their …

Ohio man cuffed AGAIN for shagging inflatable pool raft

The Ohio plastic lover arrested back in 2011 for engaging in "sexual activity" with a pink inflatable swimming pool raft has been cuffed again for the same offence. Edwin Tobergta, 35, was taken into custody on Wednesday after witnesses claimed to have clocked him naked and "performing simulated sex acts with a pink raft" on the …
Lester Haines, 16 Jun 2014

US allows commercial use of sharper satellite snaps

US-based satellite-images-for-sale outfit DigitalGlobe has had a win: its national government will allow it to sell higher-resolution images. As we noted in March, the US Senate has been considering whether local satellite operators should be allowed to sell more detailed images. The reason for the deliberations was that while …
Simon Sharwood, 15 Jun 2014

Apple, Cisco line up to protect offshore data

Apple and Cisco have aligned with Microsoft to support its fight against a US warrant that would give American law enforcement authorities access to data stored in offshore cloud servers. The two have filed a joint amicus brief in the case, adding their names to a list that includes Verizon, AT&T and the EFF. In late April, a …
man_inks_deal_channel signs contract services

Microsoft promises no snooping in new fine print for web services

Microsoft has updated its Services Agreement, the legalese almost nobody bothers to read before clicking “I Agree” when signing up for online services. The changes are notable because Microsoft has been critical of Google's fine print in the “Scroogled” campaign pointing out that rival ad-slinging-based-on-search-results outfit …
Simon Sharwood, 13 Jun 2014

Windows 8 leaker gets three months, booted back to Russia

Alex Kibkalo, the former Microsoft worker who pleaded guilty in April to leaking company secrets, is likely headed back to his native Russia in a week or so, having been sentenced to serve a brief stint in prison. According to court documents, Kibkalo was formally sentenced on Tuesday to a three-month prison term, per his plea …
Neil McAllister, 11 Jun 2014

We're ALL Winston Smith now - and our common enemy is the Big Brother State

Worstall on Weds The latest thing we've all got to worry about in this brave new world of ours is that the young, not having read Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four, are simply too eager to give up their information and privacy to the tech giants. Those richer in years have been forewarned by the novel and are thus less likely to get sucked into this …
Tim Worstall, 11 Jun 2014
management regulation2

One EURO PATENT COURT ruling for all from 'early 2015'

New EU rules have been created which allow the judgments of new unified patent courts (UPCs) to have legal effect from early 2015. A new EU regulation has been published in the trading bloc's official journal and changes existing laws on the jurisdiction of courts and recognition of their rulings. The changes mean that the …
OUT-LAW.COM, 10 Jun 2014
Image via Chicago Sun Times

Facial recognition tech convicts man in Chicago robbery case

A Chicago man has received a 22-year prison sentence after becoming the first person to be convicted with evidence from the city's facial recognition technology. Pierre Martin was sentenced Monday for a pair of armed robberies carried out on the Chicago Transit Authority train system. The incidents occurred in January and …
Shaun Nichols, 10 Jun 2014

EU privacy A-Team tells Google: Get a grip and obey OUR laws

The EU's advisory panel on privacy and data protection has warned Google to comply with Europe's laws in an unusually strongly worded statement. The Article 29 Working Party vowed to investigate if Google refused to abide by the European Court of Justice (ECJ) ruling – Google Spain v Gonzalez et al – that decreed Google was not …
Kim Dotcom at the NZ parliamentary hearing

Kim Dotcom: You give me proof of govt corruption in my case, I give you MEELLIONS

Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom is offering a $5m bounty to anyone who can prove corruption by the Feds or Hollywood studios to help him defend against the online piracy case against him. Dotcom tweeted that his case was “unfair” and he was offering the cash to anyone who wanted to blow the whistle on the authorities. My case is …

Euro judges: Copyright has NOT changed, you WON'T get sued for browsing the web

The highest European Court today confirmed that the internet can carry on working just like it has for 20 years. In doing so, it was batting away a strange request for "clarification" on copyright from the UK's Supreme Court. For the internet to function, it was established very early on that certain devices - such as routers, …
Targeted Spam

Fed-up bloke takes email spammers to court – and WINS PILE of CASH

It's 9am. You open your email client and wade through the usual pile of spam that's dropped in overnight. It's boring and tiresome. But what if you could earn yourself a few hundred quid and kill the spam off as well? In a landmark court hearing last week, Sky News producer Roddy Mansfield won unspecified damages from retail …
management regulation1

US escalates Stingray mobe-snooping secrecy battle as judge unseals evidence

The FBI's long battle to keep details of its controversial Stingray mobile phone-snooping kit under wraps has escalated, with US Marshals raiding Florida police to prevent their records being released, while a Florida judge was busily unsealing court evidence covering the IMSI-catchers. The American Civil Liberties Union had …

'Inaccurate' media misleads public on European Court's Google ruling

“Inaccurate reporting” of Google’s fight against privacy rights in Europe last month risks misleading the public, says the Information Commissioner's Office – which safeguards those rights in the UK. When a Spanish citizen demanded the removal of links in search results to news articles mentioning an old debt, Google claimed it …

Crikey! Three can buy O2, EU regulator says

The European Commission has approved Telefonica’s sale of O2 in Ireland to mobile network operator Three, in a deal originally proposed in June. This makes the network the second largest in the country behind Vodafone, but, as ever in these deals, the Hutchison Whampoa-owned Three - which paid €850m for the network - claims …
Simon Rockman, 2 Jun 2014

Scammers plead guilty to $AU500k Telstra scam

Three men have pleaded guilty to an Australian court over a scam that netted them more than $AU500,000 worth of mobile phones and fondleslabs from Telstra without payment. The Victorian County Court heard the three Indian men, on temporary visas, then sent the phones back to India for re-sale. The Herald Sun says the scam …
The Pirate Bay logo

The Pirate Bay's stor ost Peter Sunde collared at farm in Sweden

The Pirate Bay co-founder Peter Sunde, who has been fighting his conviction on charges of facilitating copyright infringement, has been arrested in Sweden. The arrest comes just days after Sunde's bid for a seat in the European Parliament as a Pirate Party representative came to nought, with the party garnering just 0.7 per cent …
management regulation2

Oi, ebook price fixer. Yes, you, Apple – stop whinging and get your chequebook out

A US appeals court has rejected Apple’s attempt to delay the damages trial over its ebook price-fixing scandal. The iPhone maker had hoped to postpone the hearings until after it’s had a chance to appeal its guilty verdict. In a very short order, seen by The Register, the Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in New York …
No sign

How to strip pesky copyright watermarks from photos ... says a FACEBOOK photo bod

A Facebook software engineer who published a detailed guide to stealing photographs online – by explaining how to remove watermarks and ignore any copyright restrictions – has been shamed into removing the blog post. It's unclear if Jesse Chen still has a future at Facebook. The company, when quizzed by The Register, declined to …
Kelly Fiveash, 29 May 2014

High court finds Newzbin's 'ops' man liable for copyright infringement

The High Court has found a man liable for copyright infringement carried out on the file-sharing Newzbin websites and ruled that he is also part of a conspiracy to infringe copyrights and defraud film studios. Mr Justice Barling said David Harris was jointly responsible along with his Newzbin Limited business for copyright- …
OUT-LAW.COM, 28 May 2014
Amazon Kindle 3

Amazon turns screws on French publisher: Don't feel sorry for Hachette, it's just 'negotiation'

Amazon has admitted that it’s restricting the sales of books from publisher Hachette over a contract dispute and defended the restrictions as a legitimate negotiating tactic. The online marketplace has been facing criticism from users, authors and publishing houses as it became apparent it was changing how it sold Hachette books …
Troll in cross hairs

Smut-spreading copyright trolls lose John Doe case

Notorious copyright troll AF Holdings has had a second “copyright shakedown” smacked down, with the US Court of Appeals denying it access to end user data. The decision seriously undermines the model by which many copyright trolling operations function. AF Holdings had sought the names and addresses of more than a thousand John …
Somali pirates storm the box

ARG! A GHOST SHIP! Pirates sunk by UK cops return from watery grave

One of the world's largest BitTorrent search engines is back online after British cops successfully – but temporarily – managed to get the domain name Torrentz.eu switched off. The website's registrar, based in Poland, had agreed to suspend the domain name following a written warning from Blighty's Police Intellectual Property …
Team Register, 27 May 2014
management regulation1

Apple wheels out sueball cannon, again

Apple and Google might have decided on a ceasefire in their global patent mutually-assured-destruction battle, but Cupertino-versus-Korea continues to grind on. In its latest move, Apple has fired off two new sueballs: one seeks a permanent injunction preventing the sale of now nearly-obsolete Samsung products in the US; the …
management regulation1

Employees grab Apple and Google's $325 MEEELLION olive branch in hiring suit

A collection of some of Silicon Valley's biggest companies has struck a deal with employees to end their class-action suit over allegations that the companies colluded to prevent hiring away workers. Apple, Google, Intel, and Adobe have put forth a proposal which would see the companies contribute to a $324.5m settlement fund to …
Shaun Nichols, 23 May 2014

French teen fined for illegal drone flight

Video The 18-year-old French lad who strapped a GoPro to a drone 'chopper and used it to produce a noteworthy aerial video of the city of Nancy has been fined €400, Le Figaro reports. Nans Thomas bought the vehicle on the internet and sent it aloft without realising he needed proper training and air authority permission. The online …
Lester Haines, 23 May 2014

Former Azzurri project manager who stole £1.3m ordered to pay back £146k

A former project manager at Azzurri Communications who stole £1.3m from the integrator has been ordered to pay back less than 10 per cent or spend more time in the slammer. Lee Stephen Young, 34, of Petronel Road, Aylesbury was found guilty of one count of theft from an employer at the town's Crown Court in March and sentenced …
Paul Kunert, 23 May 2014
FBI badge and gun

Microsoft swats away FBI request for Office 365 subscriber data

Microsoft has successfully challenged a secret letter from the Federal Bureau of Investigation ordering it to turn over data from one of its Office 365 customers, court documents made public on Thursday have revealed. The documents, which remained secret until they were unsealed by the US District Court in Seattle on Wednesday, …
Neil McAllister, 23 May 2014
Google Toilet Paper

Google hit by class action lawsuit over claimed AdSense fraud

A class action lawsuit has been filed against Google over allegations by a claimed former employee that the Chocolate Factory is defrauding users of its AdSense platform. The legal action, filed in the US District Court for the Northern District of California on Tuesday, claims that Google knowingly canceled the AdSense accounts …
Iain Thomson, 21 May 2014

Web firms, DON'T PANIC: The Euro Google 'right to be forgotten' isn't a problem

Comment Are you an internet company? Beware of companies and organisations purporting to "help" European firms interpret the new Google privacy ruling. you may find yourself taking unnecessary mitigation measures - and fuelling the trolls. Last week, the ECJ ruled that Google was subject to European privacy and data protection laws, …
Andrew Orlowski, 21 May 2014

No such luck: Apple, Samsung say peace talks are off – way off

If you were thinking last week's patent settlement between Apple and Google's former Motorola division might lead to a similar détente between Apple and Samsung, you probably shouldn't get your hopes up. Although the Korea Times reported on Monday that the two rivals were close to settling all of their litigation – and there is …
Neil McAllister, 20 May 2014

Tennessee bloke cuffed for attempting to shag ATM – police

A Tennessee man earned himself an appointment with the beak last Friday night after police claimed that he'd walked into bar, dropped his trousers and tried to have his evil way with a cash machine. According to a police report quoted by the Tennessean, 49-year-old Lonnie J. Hutton entered the Murfreesboro hostelry "and walked …
Lester Haines, 20 May 2014

Uncivil engineering: US society skewers self-published science

If you thought civil engineers were one of society's more conformist cohorts, think again: according to the American Society of Civil Engineers, they're rampant copyright pirates. Their crime is to publish full versions of their own research papers online, once those papers have been published by the ASCE's journals, and they've …