Feeds

Hardware > More stories

Bitmain AntMiner S1

MANIC MINERS: Ten Bitcoin generating machines

Product Round-up Bitcoins are either the new bubble economy or the future of online commerce. It’s not the first time anonymous e-money has been tried – ask Mondex – but Bitcoin does seem to have traction. There are things you might want that you can buy with it, such as Tesla cars and Virgin Galactic trips to space. Zynga has announced that it …
Simon Rockman, 17 Jan 2014
Science of Cambridge MK14 close-up

Ian Williamson: The engineer who gave Sinclair his first micro

Archaeologic Before Sinclair Research and the QL, the Spectrum and the ZX81, before even Sinclair Computers and the ZX80, there was Science of Cambridge and the MK14 microprocessor kit. Released in February 1978 - that’s when the first adverts for the mail-order-only offering appeared, at least - the MK14 entered the SoC pipeline late in the …
Tony Smith, 16 Jan 2014
Nest Labs' The Nest

Google's Nest gobble: Soon ALL your HOME are BELONG to US

Analysis Google’s proposed $3.2bn purchase of Nest Labs, a maker of internet-connected round-the-home devices, shows that the online advertising giant considers the Internet of Things a serious proposition. A very serious proposition. It’s easy to be dismissive of the move. Nest is best known for an internet-enabled thermostat and a …
Tony Smith, 15 Jan 2014
Sinclair QL

Sinclair’s 1984 big shot at business: The QL is 30 years old

Archaeologic In May 1983, Sinclair Research Managing Director Nigel Searle began briefing the press about the successful British micro maker’s next big release. It was 13 months after the company had launched the Spectrum and although that machine had become a huge success, punters and market-watchers were keen to hear about what Sinclair …
Tony Smith, 12 Jan 2014
Casio calculator

Ten classic electronic calculators from the 1970s and 1980s

Retro roundup Until sometime in the early 1980s, when you reached secondary school you were handed a slim book full of numbers during a maths lesson and taught how to use log tables. Sines, cosines, tangents, square roots - they were all in there too. While it made a change from long division, it caused its own share of headaches. But, to a …

Glassholes, snapt**ts, #blabbergasms, selfies and PRISM: The Reg's review of 2013

Year in Review "Selfie" is the Oxford English Dictionary's word of the year. There's nothing new about a "selfie" - it's a self-portrait - but a perfect storm of social networks and smartphones has given popularity to a word and an act even world leaders feel it's OK to do on really serious occasions. In keeping with a long tradition here at …
Gavin Clarke, 31 Dec 2013
Punk-styled girl with piercing gazes at an apple

Apple loses sauce, BlackBerry squashed and Microsoft, er, WinsPhones (Nokia's)

Year in Review It was a year where Apple slurped down enormous profits but lost some of its bleeding-edge-tech street cred, while Samsung marched inexorably on. But behind the scenes there was much more going on. Here are the year's trends put through the blender. Apple Apple's strategy is quite simple: instead of making products the …
Andrew Orlowski, 30 Dec 2013
Sinclair Sovereign calculator

El Reg's contraptions confessional no.5: The Sinclair Sovereign

Cache in the Attic Time was when having a calculator felt about as hi-tech as owning smartphone does these days. Lester Haines relives the experience when these small objects of desire weren't just about doing the numbers, but were even touted as status symbols. Sinclair Sovereign Having risked the lives of the specialist team members tasked with …
Lester Haines, 28 Dec 2013
The UK's shrinking airforce

What is the difference between a drone, a model and a light plane?

Christmas is over, it’s grey outside, and you want to look at pages of blue skies, exotic locations, and smooth, aerodynamic models. Yes, you’re ready for El Reg’s dabble in the extreme end of modelling... aircraft modelling that is. Way back in the summer we were invited to a day out at Stow Maries, a refurbished WW1 aerodrome …
Joe Fay, 26 Dec 2013

Gift-giving gotchas: How to avoid Xmas morning EMBARRASSMENT

You might think, what with gift buying out of the way, the hard work of the holiday season is largely done. Not so. Before you reach for the wrapping paper and sticky tape, there’s a fair bit more you can do to ensure a trouble- and tantrum-free Christmas Day. Batteries not included If you’ve been buying gadgets, don’t forget …
Nigel Whitfield, 23 Dec 2013
Solartron CD 1014.3 oscilloscope

El Reg's contraptions confessional no.4: Yamaha retro synth, valve oscilloscope and more

Cache in the Attic For the The Register features on MIDI's 30th birthday, Bob Dormon fired up his trusty Atari ST 1040FM and an Apple PowerBook Duo 270c, but there's a good deal more than old computers in his haul hall of vintage tech. Still a novice in the art of chucking things out, here he tunes up, warms up and winds up a few old favourites. …
Bob Dormon, 21 Dec 2013
Gran Turismo 6

Gran Turismo 6: Another glossy, gorgeous Mario Kart on steroids

Review I must admit to being rather surprised when Gran Turismo 6 was first announced. Not because yet another entry into Polyphony Digital’s driving series was a shock, but rather because it was announced for the PS3, not the the PlayStation 4. Gran Turismo 6 GT6: Revved not revised GT6 for PS4 makes rather a lot of sense, you see …
Mike Plant, 18 Dec 2013
Out Run

Sega’s Out Run: Even better than the wheel thing

Antique Code Show How bereft the coin-op arcades of yesteryear must have looked before the arrival of the audacious, muscle-flexing Out Run machine. It’s true that Hang On and Space Harrier laid the foundations a year before, but Out Run was Sega’s golden moment in sit-down, "experience" videogame machinery. There were two versions of the deluxe …
Giles Hill, 18 Dec 2013

Excise Xmas prezzie indecision MISERY with El Reg’s gift guide²

Christmas is special. When else will you spending lots of money you don’t have buying things they don’t deserve for people you don’t like? That said, we all grudgingly accept that you may want to buy some presents for people this year – bah humbug – even if you haven’t an earthly what to buy them. To help you out, we’ve come up …
Nigel Whitfield, 16 Dec 2013
Roberts Revival Blutune

Station to station: Ten DAB-Bluetooth combo radios

Product roundup When Apple changed its longstanding 30-pin iPod connector to the Lightning interface, an industry died. The ubiquitous iPod dock – that for years had appeared on just about any piece of consumer audio gear – was no longer a necessity and with more Android users out there than ever before, only a few manufacturers would offer a …
Bob Dormon, 16 Dec 2013
Apple G4 Cube

El Reg's contraptions confessional no.3: the Apple G4 Cube

Cache in the Attic If you're lucky, old gear doesn't so much die as get given away or retired. Indeed, some kit is just too quirky to dispose of, even though it gets wheezy whenever you fire up a browser. Forget computing with it though, says Andrew Orlowski, the value can lie elsewhere. Apple Power Mac G4 Cube Why keep an Apple G4 Cube in the …
Andrew Orlowski, 14 Dec 2013
Ciseco Pi-Lite

Ten top tech toys to interface with a techie’s Christmas stocking

Xmas Round-up ‘Tis the season for dropping unsubtle hints about gifts that YOU’D like to receive, or – if you prefer – for making a list of things that you would buy for nephews and nieces but, because you’re an evil misanthropic Uncle or Auntie, you’ll buy for yourself instead. At least that way there’ll be no tantrums round the tree and …
Nigel Whitfield, 11 Dec 2013
Killzone: Shadow Fall

Helghast-ly holiday: Killzone Shadow Fall

Review Guerrilla Games’ Killzone: Shadow Fall is almost impossibly good looking, especially considering it’s a launch title. Cityscapes sparkle, foliage is lush and figures cast long shadows. Lens flare is plentiful – so much so that at times I actually found myself squinting. Killzone: Shadow Fall Hel‘ghastly opponents Think back …
Mike Plant, 9 Dec 2013
Tablet PC and Hantarex CRT monitor

El Reg's contraptions confessional no.2: Tablet PC, CRT screen and more

Cache in the Attic Before wandering to pastures new, Bill Ray revealed he is definitely of the mind that, if it still works, why chuck it? His old kit isn't sitting in a box in the attic, he uses it all regularly. Hantarex, HP and Motion Computing Hantarex hails from Italy but established a UK operation in 1981 and is still going strong. The CTM …
Bill Ray, 7 Dec 2013

Inside Steve Ballmer’s fondleslab rear-guard action

Windows 8 is going down like a bucket of cold sick - but you're going to have to get used to it. It's not going away. If Microsoft has a future, this is it. Worse still, if you're a pro, you're going to have to support the thing. Microsoft had to make this desperate, poorly integrated attempt to foist a Version 1.0 touchscreen …
Liam Proven, 6 Dec 2013
Dragon 32 computer

El Reg Contraption Confessional No.1: The Dragon 32 micro

Cache in the Attic It's probably fair to say that we all have some old tech squirrelled away that we just can't bear to part with. It's not just sentimentality either, but practicality: it still works, why chuck it out? Here at Vulture Central we've our own collection of junk tech memorabilia that would make us a tad dewy-eyed if it should depart …
Tony Smith, 30 Nov 2013
Raspberry Pi

Build your OWN Apple iBeacon with a Raspberry Pi

Feature US department store Macy’s recently said it is implementing iPhone-based tracking tech the better to encourage browsing punters to buy. Of course, Macy has chosen to pitch this as an Apple technology - figuring, presumably, iPhone owners are more receptive to inducements delivered through technology and have more cash to splash …
Tony Smith, 29 Nov 2013
John Miller-Kirkpatrick

Britain’s forgotten first home computer pioneer: John Miller-Kirkpatrick

Archaeologic Too few people today remember John Miller-Kirkpatrick, the enthusiastic founder, owner, manager and technical director of Bywood Electronics. He died in December 1978 at the monstrously young age of 32, less than two years before the début of the Sinclair ZX80 and the start of the UK home computing boom – for which he had helped …
Tony Smith, 29 Nov 2013

How STEVE JOBS saved Apple's bacon with an outstretched ARM

Feature The chip designers at ARM Holdings have turned the computing world upside down, shaken Intel to its core, pulled AMD into its orbit, and broadened its range beyond mobile into every nook and cranny of the digital world, from toys to servers. But where did this UK wonder company come from? How does it earn its living? And how did …
Rik Myslewski, 27 Nov 2013
Motorola Moto G

Moto G: Google's KitKat bruiser could knock out, bury Landfill Android

Analysis Two weeks ago Motorola launched a cheap-as-chips Android phone that by common consent, isn't actually nasty. Quite rightly, the new Motorola Moto G has shot to the top of the picks of smartphones in the sub-£150 price point. In fact, you can pick one up without contract from Amazon for £135. Android has been this cheap before. …
Andrew Orlowski, 27 Nov 2013
Apple MacBook Pro 17in 2009 fusion upgrade in 2013

You DON'T need a new MacBook! Reg man fiddles with Fusion, pimps out vintage Pro

Feature I need a new MacBook Pro… or do I? It’s probably a question that many a Mac user ponders and, given the choices these days, is much more difficult to answer. Having just reviewed the MacBook Pro 13in with Retina Display, I’m not sure I’m ready to commit myself to soldered RAM and the hope that upgrades will appear for its custom …
Bob Dormon, 26 Nov 2013
Tomb Raider

Hooters, shooters and looters: Eidos’s Tomb Raider

Antique Code Show It has been argued that Tomb Raider’s star, Lara Croft, was the first feminist female of video games: a bastion of 1990s "girl power" and the "ladette" culture that was (supposedly) happening at the time, and thus a great role-model for young empowered women everywhere. Then again, take one glance at Lara posing on the cover for …
Giles Hill, 25 Nov 2013
Peter Capaldi channels William Hartnell

Doctor Who: From Edwardian grump to Malcolm Tucker and back again

Doctor Who @ 50 Since Doctor Who returned in 2005, its producers have loved showing the Doctor’s previous selves, from the pen and ink portraits in Human Nature’s Journal of Impossible Things and the Cybermen’s infostamps in The Next Doctor, to the curious, multiple incarnation runaround in the Doctor’s personal time stream in The Name of the …
Ian Harrison, 22 Nov 2013

Doctor Who Episode One: Through a glass. Darkly

Doctor Who @ 50 Today, the world of 1963 seems extraordinarily remote - and narrow. The “Beatles” name was still a jarring pun, and Telstar live transatlantic TV was just a little over a year old. I remember seeing JFK via Telstar when it kicked off, and then again that November in Dallas in 1963. There were no supermarkets, no plastic bags, …
John Lettice, 21 Nov 2013
Doctor Who: Highs and lows

BAD ALTITUDE: The highs and lows of Doctor Who

Doctor Who @ 50 The Doctor’s many visits to Earth have seen him not only venture around the globe but also far above and below its surface. Early on he was high in the Pamir Mountains, the highest peak of which reaches 7,495m, although the pass in which the travellers first met Marco Polo was probably nearer 4,200m — high enough for the elderly …
Paul Smith, 21 Nov 2013

Lumia 1520: Our man screams into ENORMO new Nokia phondleslab

Review So we’re all Dom Joly now - shouting into gigantically oversized phones. Well, not everybody - but large devices have seen amazing sales increase in the 18 months, catapulting them out of the techie niche they’ve quietly inhabited for years. You can say phablet, we prefer “phondleslab”. Whatever they’re called, these pocket- …
Andrew Orlowski, 21 Nov 2013
The TR1200DT-7 treadmill desk

SuperStride Me: Reg man attempts to walk off GIANT CURRY

Part 2 A Malaysian curry laksa is a giant bowl of prawn stock and coconut milk soup laced with spices, two types of noodles, tofu, meat and soybean sprouts. It is usually served with a big dollop of chilli. Laksa may be delicious (and really should have become the UK's number one pub lunch years ago), but is an insane thing to eat if …
Simon Sharwood, 20 Nov 2013
Delia Derbyshire edits on a Philips EL3503 while Desmond Briscoe checks the script

Delia and the Doctor: How to cook up a tune for a Time Lord

Doctor Who @ 50 As a theme tune, Ron Grainer’s music for Doctor Who needs no introduction. But to describe this unique piece of electronic music as solely Ron Grainer’s composition would be a disservice to the considerable musical contribution made by Delia Derbyshire, who in 1963 set about realising the original score at the BBC’s Radiophonic …
Bob Dormon, 19 Nov 2013
Doctor Who: Earth and beyond

GALACTIC YO-YO: Doctor Who’s trips to Earth... and beyond

Doctor Who @ 50 We’ve seen how much of a tendency the Doctor has for visiting Earth relative to other planets in the universe, so what are the trends over his own timeline in his movements between Earth and elsewhere? When has the series felt most tied to our planet? For this chart, each story was assigned a score of +1 if it predominantly took …
Paul Smith, 19 Nov 2013
The TR1200DT-7 treadmill desk

SuperStride Me: Reg hack spends week working at 'treadmill desk'

Part 1 I turned 45 this year, a psychological milestone that rammed home the fact I'm not in great physical shape. My diet's rubbish and my usual efforts to keep trim and fit – cycling – have been curtailed by a combination of lethargy and kids' sport commitments that keep me off the road when my bike club sets out on weekends. Which …
Simon Sharwood, 18 Nov 2013
The Master

What a plot of nonsense: Ten Master master plan FAILS

Doctor Who @ 50 “I am the Master, and you will obey me.” He was the Professor Moriarty to the Doctor’s Sherlock Holmes, another renegade Time Lord and always out to conquer the universe - or destroy it. The Master The vicar of diaboly Source: BBC There’s a fan theory that the Master was no megalomaniac at all, but an agent of the Time Lords …
Tony Smith, 18 Nov 2013

Who’s Who: a Reg quest to find the BEST DOCTOR

Doctor Who @ 50 As befits a show about a Time Lord, Doctor Who straddles the generations like a colossus. Even if you weren’t there in 1963, you picked up on the Doctor as some point during his travels. That means a shared experience, regardless of whether you grew up under the influence of Harold Wilson or Maggie Thatcher, whether you watched …
Simon Sharwood, 15 Nov 2013
Daleks in Australia

DE-MON-STRATE! How a DALEK SAVED AUSTRALIA from a Dr Who drought in 1977

Doctor Who @ 50 The trike inside the racing Dalek belonged to Kerrie Dougherty’s little brother Geoffrey, who had left it on the front porch of his Sydney home alongside his smaller, older set of wheels. Kerrie had intended to use the smaller, outgrown trike when she and some friends from the University of Sydney planned to build and enter a …
Simon Sharwood, 14 Nov 2013
Doctor Who: The Companions

Are you experienced? The Doctor Who assistants that SUFFERED the most

Doctor Who @ 50 There is a range of events the Doctor’s companions can expect to encounter, from meeting his most arch of enemies to being flung bodily through time and space, and undergoing various forms of attack. One might presume the more adventures they have, the more of these experiences they’ll gain, so the radius of the slices indicates …
Paul Smith, 14 Nov 2013

How to relieve Microsoft's Surface RT piles problem

Somewhere in Redmond (at least metaphorically speaking) are several very large piles of unsold Surface RT tablet components. Why did the long-awaited and much-hyped ARM tablet running "Windows for ARM" Windows RT flop so badly, when ARM tablets running iOS for ARM from Apple are doing so well? It's not just the Modern Windows …
Liam Proven, 14 Nov 2013
Doctor Who: The Enemies

PUNISHMENT gluttons: The Dr Who monsters that come back for more

Doctor Who @ 50 Given the Doctor’s propensity for making enemies, he has faced relatively few more than twice. This is perhaps not surprising for someone who can travel anywhere in the whole history of the entire universe – the chances of bumping into someone again should be low. But the demands of making an adventure TV series mean return …
Paul Smith, 13 Nov 2013
Research Machines 380Z

The micro YOU used in school: The story of the Research Machines 380Z

Archaeologic If you’re a British techie of a certain age, there’s only one microcomputer that defines your first memories of computing at school. No, not Acorn’s BBC Micro – the Research Machines 380Z. While Acorn was still knocking up the Proton, the machine being designed as the successor to the Atom, and while the BBC was pondering how it …
Tony Smith, 13 Nov 2013