More stories

Vulcan bomber bomb bays, photo Phil Holding

Goodbye Vulcan: Blighty's nuclear bomber retires for the last time

Visit a British air show before September and it's possible you’ll get the opportunity to witness the last Vulcan bomber in flight - and this is definitely the last year you'll get the chance, this time. Alongside the staple leather-clad wing-walking ladies, the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight, simulated Apache attack- …
Shounting man in suit image via Shutterstock

Want to spoil your favourite storage vendor's day? Buy cloud

Organisations continue to buy storage. In fact, I was talking to a storage salesman not so long ago who was telling me that one of his customers regularly calls asking for a quote for “a couple more petabytes." However, on-premises storage is not the end of the story. Yes, you need to have storage electronically close (with …
Microsoft_EOS

The Great Windows Server 2003 migration: Where do we go from here?

We all have to move away from Server 2003 before it turns into a pumpkin in July, but there are so many options out there that choosing the destination for our data and workloads can be a little overwhelming. What your workloads are will play a big part in determining which operating system you can upgrade to. The details of …
Trevor Pott, 30 Jun 2015
server room

How do we train the next generation of data centre wranglers?

There's a world of difference between what the average IT person does today and what they'd have done ten or fifteen years ago. So where's it going? What will we need to teach the next generation of data centre staff? The shifting focus The big difference between yesteryear and now is the growth in managed hosted services. “The …
Dave Cartwright, 30 Jun 2015

Does your company really need all that storage?

I was chatting not long ago to a sales guy from one of the big storage vendors. The market he serves is one of those where some of his customers buy a petabyte at a time – which I am sure he is happy about when it comes to hitting his sales quotas. The thing is, though, most companies have much more modest requirements. These “ …
Dave Cartwright, 30 Jun 2015
Windows 10 on Surface 3

Windows 10 is due in one month: Will it be ready?

Analysis The release of Windows 10 is set for 29 July, just one month from now. It will be a significant moment, marking the first Windows 10 release in a wave that will eventually include Windows Mobile and Xbox, and is critically important to Microsoft following the poor reception for Windows 8. This time, Microsoft is not following …
Tim Anderson, 29 Jun 2015
Kobo Glo HD

Q: What's black and white and read all over? A: E-reader displays

Feature Reading on screen can be something of a chore. As computers have become smaller and more pocketable, so it's become more possible to carry around a device that not only has a reasonable quality display, but weighs little enough to be considered a replacement for a book. Kobo Glo HD Get Carta: Kobo's Glo HD has the latest e- …
Nigel Whitfield, 28 Jun 2015
suicidal_clown_shutterstock_648

Bitcoin, schmitcoin. Let's play piggyback on the blockchain

Bitcoin may have generated countless salacious news headlines, but it’s a cameo player in a much bigger act. The blockchain is the real innovation that that makes Bitcoin work, and could well outlast the upstart currency. But it’s in trouble – and Silicon Valley has forked out millions to try and save it. The blockchain is a …
Danny Bradbury, 26 Jun 2015

Win the business services race with run-book automation

Bringing a more service-based culture to your IT department is a great idea, but who will manage it behind the scenes? Service-based IT is the holy grail for IT departments that want to improve their standing in the business. In the bad old days, IT was a black art, practised behind closed doors by Merlin-like figures. No …
Danny Bradbury, 26 Jun 2015
head of 50s-style robot

In search of an easier life: Do IT converged systems fit the bill?

Could converged systems change the way that IT admins spend their time? Figures suggest that mundane tasks such as backups and restores and system patches take between two and ten hours a week for around a third of those responsible for administering systems. Even more time is spent monitoring systems to ensure that they’re …
Robin Birtstone, 25 Jun 2015
Spaghetti with tomato sauce

How to turn application spaghetti into tasty IT services

The promise of IT service management is to deliver services that make sense to their business users. To do that, though, IT departments must be able to untangle their own internal resources. IT services must be accessible in one place so that users can find them easily and administrators can manage them. And the back-end …
Danny Bradbury, 25 Jun 2015
Baby in t-shirt - with logo "I'm recording everything"

10 things you need to avoid SNAFUs in your data centre

Despite my apparently youthful good looks, I've been in the IT industry since 1989. Which means I've been around the block a bit, and have learned rather a lot of lessons – some of them the hard way. To avoid you having to find them out yourself, here are ten to be going on with. 1. Always carry a torch in your laptop bag …
Dave Cartwright, 24 Jun 2015
Circuit board underwear by emiko-o

Whoops, there goes my data! Hold onto your privates in the Dropbox era

Your users are probably using cloud-based services that you’re not even aware of to organise their files and collaborate with each other. What are you going to do about it? “Shadow” IT — cloud services bought from third-party providers without authorisation by the IT department — is becoming a significant problem for many …
Danny Bradbury, 24 Jun 2015
Android icon desktop toys

Blurred lines, as consumer tech swallows delivery of BIG IT

A decade of “consumerisation” of IT has, according to Gartner, succeeded in shifting the balance of power within organisations — across departments and from hierarchies to individuals. For IT companies traditionally dominating the B2C market, the opportunities to target the enterprise space looms large. Already consumer tech …
Rachel Willcox, 24 Jun 2015

A brief introduction to converged infrastructure

Sometimes, it’s better to think inside the box. Bundling different IT components together into a single unit may just solve some of your computing problems, if you plan it right. Welcome to the world of IT convergence. Depending on which vendor or analyst you talk to, it’s known as an integrated system, a unified computing …
Robin Birtstone, 23 Jun 2015
FJ cruiser by https://www.flickr.com/photos/paperstainer/ Cc 2.0 attribution  https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Two foreigners, a desert and a jeep full of bank statements

On-Call Welcome again to On-Call, our weekend regular in which we share readers' tales of odd things that happen at odd times in odd places. This week, reader Alex tells us he once worked in the Saudi Arabian capital of Riyadh, for a major bank. “There had been a bunch of problems, which meant the customer account statements were …
Darren Pauli, 21 Jun 2015

Post-pub nosh neckfiller: Nasi goreng pattaya

We invite our wobbly dining regulars to travel with us today to Malaysia, in search of "nasi goreng pattaya" – a tempting egg omelette envelope stuffed with chicken fried rice, with a distinctly Western splash of tomato ketchup. Nasi goreng pattaya is known as nasi goreng amplop in Indonesia, where nasi goreng ("fried rice") is …
Lester Haines, 20 Jun 2015
Sir Maurice Wilkes photo Computer Laboratory University of Cambridge

Cambridge’s HPC-as-a-service for boffins, big and small

Cambridge University has been involved in high performance computing for 18 years, starting with a “traditional” supercomputer, before a major restructuring eight years later led to what would now be considered high-performance computing (HPC). We read much about how IT needs to become a profit not a cost center. Well, as part …
Register Roundtable at the Soho hotel

CISOs' newest fear? Criminals with a big data strategy

CIO Manifesto We again gathered an eclectic mix of IT execs including some CISOs, CTOs etc, in a secret bunker to discuss whether we’re winning the security battle. OK, the “bunker” was a meeting room under the Soho Hotel, but not only are we not winning, it is not even clear what winning actually means. On Target Our IT execs happily …
Dominic Connor, 19 Jun 2015
Agricultural silos in Paraguay

Three things you need to break down those company silos

If you’re the guy tasked with breaking down silos, should you be breaking down the people who police those silos first? We explore how to de-mine your team ahead of your brownfield project. I've worked with a number of companies, as both an employee and a contractor, since I started working in IT in the late 1980s. And of course …
Dave Cartwright, 18 Jun 2015
US Navy man crawling under barbed wire in tough mudder competition

Why are there so many Windows Server 2003 stragglers?

Windows Server 2003 is almost out of support, and many of us simply don't have the option to upgrade to a newer operating system. In some cases this problem is self-imposed. In others it is the result of events beyond our control. Either way, there are millions of businesses – mostly small businesses – who simply don't have the …
Trevor Pott, 16 Jun 2015
NBC suit worker image via Shutterstock

A server apocalypse can come in different shapes and sizes. Be prepared

I run into the same misconceptions about business continuity on an almost daily basis. “We’ve already got backups, so why would we need to have a disaster recovery site as well?,” comes up with alarming regularity, as does: “We spent tens of thousands on a disaster recovery site, so why did we have that four-minute outage – why …
Tom Baines, 16 Jun 2015
Abbott and Costello dressed as policemen

It's curtains for you, copper: IBM boffins push the LIGHT FANTASTIC

IBM last month claimed a breakthrough in photonics – the practice of using light pulses rather than electrons to quickly send signals in chips. Big Blue claimed its boffins had successfully designed and tested a fully integrated wavelength multiplexed silicon photonics chip which would be capable of turning out 100Gbps optical …
Dave Wilby, 15 Jun 2015
Edward Snowden

'Snowden risked lives' fearfest story prompts sceptical sneers

Analysis A row has broken out over claims that Russian and Chinese have reportedly decrypted files of NSA leaker Edward Snowden, identifying British and US secret agents in the process. The Sunday Times used unnamed UK government and intel agency officials1 to support a story that MI6 has withdrawn agents from overseas operations in …
John Leyden, 15 Jun 2015
big dog little dog, image Shutterstock

How OpenStack became the big dogs' game – and why it's still for you

If you did have any doubts, recent events should have assuaged them, the division between the public and private cloud is here – and widening. In what might seem to be the industry’s quickest act of consolidation and M&A in less than five years, almost all the originators of OpenStack and the early entrants are gone – snapped …
Gavin Clarke, 15 Jun 2015

Innocent Spaniards roasted by experimental napalm mead

Pics Regular Reg readers will be aware that our Low Orbit Helium Assisted Navigator (LOHAN) rocket wrangler Paul "Lord Shax" Shackleton, when he's not lighting blue touchpapers, may be found brewing 18 per cent ABV mead or blowing his own head off with 1.5 million Scoville masala omelettes, featuring the awe-inspiring Carolina Reaper …
Lester Haines, 14 Jun 2015
Green data centre

Fire, fire! Just move your data centre onto my lawn ... Oh rats!

On-Call Welcome again to On-Call, our regular weekend feature in which readers share the odd things they've been asked to do at odder times of the day. This week's contributor has asked to remain anonymous, because his tale of a curious incident concerns a company that provided services to the emergency folk, among others. Our reader …
Simon Sharwood, 14 Jun 2015
Eugene Kaspersky in Sydney

Duqu 2.0: 'Terminator' malware that pwned Kaspersky could have come from Israel

Eugene Kaspersky reckons hacking into his firm's corporate network was a "silly" move by cyberspies, but independent experts are far from convinced. All seem agreed that the rare attack by a state against an leading information security firm is bad news for corporate security more generally, as it shows attacks are getting more …
Weather vane image via Shutterstock

A 16 Petaflop Cray: The key to fantastic summer barbecues

Successful BBQ at the weekend, or did a cloudburst stop play, leaving your fridge groaning beneath a mountain of uncooked ribs and sausages? If only the weather forecast had been more reliable. By 2017 that might be possible, as the Met Office – responsible for generating more than 3,000 tailored forecasts and briefings each …
Gavin Clarke, 10 Jun 2015
Protestor barricade image via Shutterstock

Software-defined freedom: A liberating experience for YOU

Software Defined Networking (SDN) and Network Functions Virtualisation (NFV) are the future – and if you aren't already learning about them you're probably already doomed. If that strikes you as a little pessimistic then there is a bright side: most of us are already doing some of it and we all understand more about it than we …
Trevor Pott, 8 Jun 2015
Racecar

SDN's dream: Use what you've got, not what you're promised

Is hardware turning soft? Yes, if you listen to IT vendors. Companies such as Oracle are investing in Software Defined Networking (SDN) — turning features that were once hardware into apps or part of the networking layer or running as apps on servers. I've recently written about the problems and promises of SDN and find the …
Trevor Pott, 8 Jun 2015

The weapons pact threatening IT security research

Analysis The US government has rewritten chunks of an obscure weapons trade pact between itself, Europe, Russia, and other nations – a pact that is now casting its shadow over today's computer security tools. Dubbed the Wassenaar Agreement on Export Controls for Conventional Arms and Dual-Use Goods and Technologies, the treaty limits who …
Iain Thomson, 6 Jun 2015
Jamie Bartlett delivering Register Summer Lecture

Camgirls, crypto currency and beer: The Register tours the Dark Net

Register Lectures Very few of us, even at The Reg, have spent a year trawling the darkest corners of the internet, getting to know right wing agitators, crypto currency zealots, and Yorkshire’s leading Camgirl. Jamie Bartlett did though, and he shared his experiences with a room full of Register readers at our Summer lecture on May 21. He took …
Joe Fay, 5 Jun 2015
arrow pointing up

What hyper-converged storage really means for you

To paraphrase an old joke, ask three IT “experts” for a definition of hyper-convergence and you'll get four different answers - depending on which areas they work in and what their employers are currently trying to sell. We are going to simplify things though by looking at it through the prism of storage. This turns out to be a …
Bryan Betts, 5 Jun 2015
Amazon data center

Your servers are underwater? Chill OUT, baby – liquid's cool

Every time we Tweet, procrastinate by watching an online video of a puppy with hiccups, or query a cloud, we spin up a chain reaction of hardware and electrons in some data centre somewhere. This generates heat that must be dissipated. Moore’s Law – the observation that recently celebrated a 50-year milestone and which maintains …
Dave Wilby, 4 Jun 2015

Federation promises to bring your storage under control

As virtualisation brings IT consolidation back onto the agenda, storage federation is being touted by many as the best way to impose discipline on infrastructures that have grown unwieldy. So what can it offer that storage virtualisation or a global file system cannot, and is it time for us all to join the federation? Storage …
Bryan Betts, 3 Jun 2015
Mist and condensation, image via Shutterstock

Hybrid cloud: Define what it is, then decide what you want

First, there was software as a service, infrastructure and then platform as a service, then public and private cloud, and today hybrid cloud — but is the latter vendor-driven cloud washing or something more? Lending credence to the latter is the fact EMC last week spent a juicy $1.2bn buying Virtustream to increase its presence …
Flats, image via Shutterstock

Forget the density, just unlock your cloud's power sweet spot

Talk to a friend or colleague in IT, and pretty soon you’ll get on the topic of big data, the data explosions, and mega data centres. Bar stool logic — and prevailing wisdom — suggests there is no end to our collective hunger for data, and so this must be fed by ever-larger, ever-denser data centres designed, powered and chilled …
Dave Wilby, 2 Jun 2015
Threesome photo via Shutterstock

You'll never love an appliance like your old database

Huawei recently announced a database appliance. The Appliance for Large Database is based on the Chinese data centre usurper’s FusionServer RH8100 beast that targets RISC with a battery of Xeon Intel chips. The Huawei machine has been constructed for the newest version of SAP’s Business Suite, S/4HANA, which was announced …
Legoland Windsor Knight's Kingdom

Spoiling staff with toys could turn against your business

Many companies put staff engagement high on the agenda: they reason that if you keep staff happy they are likely to be productive and stick with you through difficult times as well as when it is all going swimmingly. It is a perfectly sensible thing to do – so long as you involve the IT department in the process. My first IT …
management mobile

Where’s the best place for your infrastructure bottleneck?

As technology evolves, bottlenecks in the infrastructure move around. The switch speed leapfrogs the server speed, then the servers are upgraded with faster LAN cards and the spinning disks in the SAN become the weak link, so you upgrade and find that the SAN fabric is holding you back. How does everything interact? And as the …
The Sirius Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

What does it take to find the Antikythera Mechanism? Underwater robots, of course!

I worked on ... A few days from now, Christian Lees will be in the Greek islands, sunning himself on the deck of a colossal private yacht. Staff on the yacht will prepare his meals, even do his laundry. But those staff can't program or troubleshoot Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV), which is why Lees will be aboard the yacht during its …
Simon Sharwood, 31 May 2015