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Professor Eryk Dutkiewicz, Macquarie University

All those new '5G standards'? Here's the science they rely on

The 5G arms race has commenced, but beneath the duelling “my 5G is faster than your 5G” demos, there's serious work going on – and whatever the future of 5G, that work will change the future of mobility one way or the other. With that in mind, The Register spoke to Professor Eryk Dutkiewicz of Macquarie University. In May, …
SAP Match Insights

SAP: It was our Big Data software wot won it for Germany

When England played in Ecuador and Honduras for “warm weather training” in June ahead of the World Cup, they’d already lost the tournament – they just didn’t know it. SAP Match Insights Do the bendy data, SAP Wayne Rooney and Co took to the field in Florida to adjust to the hot and humid climate they’d face in Brazil and to …
Gavin Clarke, 22 Jul 2014
Today's bloated CPE

WTF is ... Virtual Customer Premises Equipment?

As software-defined networking takes off, it's become the basis of a parallel development: network function virtualisation. NFV is a boon to the data centre. For decades now, giants and minnows of the networking industry alike – Cisco and all of its competitors, along with anybody offering firewalls, WAN optimisation devices and …
IBM quarterly storage revenues

Clouds gathering above Big Blue's storage empire

The Big Blue IT colossus' storage revenues have carried on declining, with only FlashSystems showing growth, and stellar growth at that. Within the Systems and Technology segment of IBM's second quarter 2014 results, revenues from System Storage decreased 12 per cent - although flash storage grew more than 100 per cent. This is …
Chris Mellor, 21 Jul 2014
Fall of the Berlin Wall, 1989

Party like it's not 1999: Cry FREEDOM for a better web

Programming the Web, Pt. I If you travelled back to 1999 and told web developers that one day hundreds of them would pony up cold hard cash to get a feature in a web browser, none of them would have believed you. 1999 was the high water mark of the browser wars between Microsoft's Internet Explorer and Netscape Communications' Navigator. Microsoft was …
SOURCE:  http://www.sxc.hu/browse.phtml?f=view&id=1412135

There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES

Analysis A new report from the European Audiovisual Observatory shows what a sorry state European TV and film production is in when compared with the US market, and shows that US programming is increasing its stranglehold on European TV and video services. While the initial functions of the European Audiovisual Observatory were mostly …
Faultline, 21 Jul 2014
Volcano erupting

Two years in the making: Sneak peek at VMware's future VVOL tech

VMware says its virtual volume storage technology – which has spent two years in development – is set to erupt onto the storage array landscape next year, causing profound changes for array controllers. Virtual volumes or VVOLs provide storage for VMware virtual machines (VMs) that currently need LUN (Logical Unit Number) or …
Chris Mellor, 14 Jul 2014
Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos

Blighty's Amazon Cloud Lord: It's a battle of men vs boys, and I ain't no boy

Apple and Google haven't won the cloud yet, according to one particularly chest-thumping interview with Microsoft's chief executive Satya Nadella this week. But who has? Is it ... Amazon, perhaps? We talked to Amazon's top UK & Ireland cloud kingpin to get an insight. So here's the background to the battle. First, there's …
Gavin Clarke, 14 Jul 2014
WAves

It's a boxless, super-flash, hyper-converged world: But what'll we do for BULK STORAGE?

Blocks & Files Bulk secondary and tertiary data is going to the cloud. Not right now and not for everybody but the local ownership, operation and management of secondary data storage is costly and complicated and – slowly but surely – the cloud storage services are getting cheap enough and reliable enough to take over. CIOs will likely …
Chris Mellor, 10 Jul 2014
Redefine

EMC gives up the goods at storage shindig: VMAX3 speeds, feeds

EMC's been keeping quiet on the whole "how fast can this baby go" front when it comes to the VMAX3 range. But the storage vendor used its megalaunch – with its "Redefine Possible" tagline and futuristic look – to break its silence. So what's under the hood? EMC has extended VMAX to run more and different workloads. Each of “Gen …
Chris Mellor, 10 Jul 2014
Ultimate Ears Boom

We need to talk about SPEAKERS: Sorry, 'audiophiles', only IT will break the sound barrier

Feature Today’s loudspeakers are nowhere near as good as they could be, due in no small measure to the presence of "traditional" audiophile products. In the future, loudspeakers will increasingly communicate via digital wireless links and will contain digital processing. Indeed, the link between IT and loudspeakers is destined to grow …
DDN CEO and co-founder Alex Bouzari

Alex Bouzari on his big data storage firm: First, we got rid of the VCs

DataDirect Networks is quite unusual for a storage firm. First, it operates at supercomputer and HPC levels and is neither VC-backed nor a public company, making its internal strategies a matter for its execs alone. In this respect, it’s not as predictable or understandable as either a VC-backed startup or a post-IPO business. …
Chris Mellor, 30 Jun 2014
Double Dragon

Face up to a double life with hybrid Office 365

“Cloud first” is Microsoft’s new mantra. The vision is of businesses using Office 365, running in Microsoft’s Global data centres, for collaborating, conferencing, messaging and calendaring. The shift towards Office 365 becomes more marked every quarter as more IT departments adopt Microsoft’s cloud offerings. The appeal is that …
estonia attack

Daddy, what will you do in the new security wars?

A senior figure at the anti-virus giant McAfee once told this writer the security industry was a mess. There were too many vendors trying to do too many things. But what the industry mirrors is the threat landscape it is trying to calm down. Just look at what’s happened in the past six months. Two of the most significant …
Tom Brewster, 24 Jun 2014
Micron RealSSD

Chipper chipmaker Micron shows off boosted bottom line – gee, thanks, Elpida

Analysis Memory chipmaker Micron Technology – still riding high on the announcement that its on-package memory will bolster Intel's "Knights Landing" processor – has announced what appear to be cheery results today. Its fiscal 2014 quarter revenues were $3.98bn, 3 per cent lower than the second quarter of fiscal 2014 but a whopping 72 …
Chris Mellor, 24 Jun 2014
Freescale Internet of Things overview

Traffic lights, fridges and how they've all got it in for us

No doubt many of The Reg’s readers are tired of the term “the Internet of Things”. It is both a nebulous term and a vague idea. What it attempts to encapsulate is the masses of networks of automated machines that didn’t traditionally have connectivity, working to manage the environment around them, supposedly for the benefit of …
Tom Brewster, 23 Jun 2014
Photo by Hugo Glendinning: Ibsen's Ghosts – Almeida Theatre Production

For one night only – Ibsen classic gets the Dolby Atmos treatment

The last time I sat in Dolby’s private Atmos theatre in London, I was treated to the audiovisual feast that is X-Men: Days of Future Past. This time around, the production values are very different. Photo by Hugo Glendinning: Ibsen's Ghosts – Almeida Theatre Production Lesley Manville (Helene Alving) and Jack Lowden (Oswald …
Bob Dormon, 23 Jun 2014

What you need to know before moving to the cloud

If you are located in the land Down Under and searching for public cloud hosting, then it might seem that the options available to you are pretty good. Amazon and Microsoft play in the market and the prices they offer are reasonably competitive. There are also a number of smaller cloud operators doing quite well for themselves …
Aaron Milne, 19 Jun 2014
School of Rock

Good god, where will the new storage experts come from?

As we enter the middle of the 2010 decade, new IT projects are increasingly being designed for the public cloud instead of local IT systems. Gartner figures that by the end of 2016 we'll be through the looking glass, with more money spent on "cloud" applications and services than traditional delivery mechanisms. Soon thereafter …
Trevor Pott, 19 Jun 2014
A wrong way road sign in Boston, Massachusetts

Finding the formula for the travelling salesman problem

A wrong way road sign in Boston, Massachusetts What do heuristics, graph theory and doughnuts have in common? Each of them, in its own way, underpins one of the most challenging parts of the logistics process: planning delivery routes. Every day, millions of products find their way from manufacturers to distributors, …
Robin Birtstone, 18 Jun 2014
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella

'Cortana-gate' ruins Satya Nadella's Microsoft honeymoon

Analysis It looks like Satya Nadella's honeymoon as Microsoft CEO is over, and it happened during what's already being called "Cortana-gate" by Redmond's own commentards. Smart and decisive, Nadella has enjoyed good press and huge support within Microsoft. But his instant response to the many strategic issues bedevilling Microsoft - …
Andrew Orlowski, 17 Jun 2014
Man in black suit wearing neon

The rise of the humans: How to outsmart the digital deluge

Dave Coplin Dave Coplin, speaking at Business Transformed A few days ago, I heard an interesting keynote speech. The speaker was Dave Coplin, who in times past could have been called an anthropologist. Dave’s job title is in fact "chief envisioning officer" at Microsoft UK. The speech took place at Business Transformed, a …
Simon Rockman, 17 Jun 2014

Microsoft C# chief Hejlsberg: Our open-source Apache pick will clear the FUD

“Pushing that button was one of the more impactful clicks of my career,” says Microsoft’s C# lead architect Anders Hejlsberg. The click in question was made on stage at Microsoft’s Build conference in April, and its effect was to publish the .NET Compiler platform, codenamed Roslyn, as open source under the Apache 2.0 licence. …
Tim Anderson, 16 Jun 2014
Uncle Sam recruiting poster

Blame WWI, not Bin Laden, for NSA's post-9/11 intel suck

Edward Snowden anniversary week You might think the dragnet surveillance tactics employed by the National Security Agency (NSA) detailed by inside man Edward Snowden were born in the aftermath of Osama Bin Laden's attacks on 11 September, 2001, which resulted in the deaths of nearly 3,000 people as well as the destruction of the twin towers of the World Trade …
John Leyden, 13 Jun 2014

Tech companies are raising their game (and pants) post-Snowden

Snowden anniversary If there’s a positive to the disclosures by ex-National Security Contractor (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden, it’s that it’s been a disaster for technology and internet firms. Yes, a positive. In the last year we’ve learned the NSA has backdoors placed in the hardware that makes networks, the existence of massive funnels placed …
Iain Thomson, 12 Jun 2014
NPL Large Pressure Tank, photo: Gavin Clarke

Measure for measure: We visit the most applied-physicist-rich building in the UK

Geek's Guide to Britain Shielded by lime trees in a quiet corner of south-west London, a low, modern building constructed of green glass sits on rolling lawns behind a high metal fence. It’s a discreet facility save for a huge white sign facing the road with an blue official crest and three large letters that spell out NPL – the National Physical …
Gavin Clarke, 12 Jun 2014

Do you really have to slash and burn to upgrade your storage?

Whether it’s new storage architectures, software defined networking (SDN) or cloud computing, the assumption is you start with bucket-loads of cash and either a slash 'n' burn approach to your existing set-up or develop a green field site into which you can install the latest all-singing, all-dancing technology. But what if this …
Bryan Betts, 11 Jun 2014
Kindle Big Brother

Snowden's Big Brother isn't as Orwellian as you'd think

Snowden Anniversary Few will forget learning the truth about Santa Claus. Many also felt deep shock on realising that a hitherto ultra-secret NSA/GCHQ programme, revealed in documents leaked by whistleblower Edward Snowden, was constantly rating everyone on a naughty-nice metric based on indiscriminate covert surveillance all their online activity …
SA Mathieson, 11 Jun 2014
Tetris on Game Boy

Happy Birthday Tetris: It's flipping 30

Antique Code Show Forget the oil, forget the gas – even forget the aggressive foreign policy. The commodity that granted Russia its modern day super-wealth is clearly Tetris, which clocks up its 30th birthday today. Youtube Video Poor old beardie Alexey Pajitnov – the title’s original designer and programmer – bashed out his first attempt on a …
Giles Hill, 6 Jun 2014
NSA parody T-shirt

NSA: Inside the FIVE-EYED VAMPIRE SQUID of the INTERNET

Snowden Anniversary One year after The Guardian opened up the trove of top secret American and British documents leaked by former National Security Agency (NSA) sysadmin Edward J Snowden, the world of data security and personal information safety has been turned on its head. Everything about the safety of the internet as a common communication …
Container Vessel at Sea

You've made the product, now get it to the customers

Logistics may not seem as sexy as, say, R&D or social-media marketing – but messing it up could easily ruin your business. There are several things SMEs should think about when planning the part of their business that gets products out to customers. Far too many companies miss out this key part of the business equation, warns …
Robonaut 2 with stuff. Credit: NASA

Automating repetitive tasks: If it moves, script it

Workshop DBAs can often fall into the trap of carrying out repetitive tasks and processes. The good news is that you can automate a lot of these tasks to save time, money, and above all, sanity. The bad news is that few database administrators (DBAs) are doing it. In its 2013 database manageability survey, the Independent Oracle User …
Robin Birtstone, 30 May 2014
Windows XP

Cyber crims smash through Windows into the great beyond

Windows has been a beleaguered piece of software over the years. That is because malicious hackers, like everyone else, want to walk the simplest path to the greatest glory. Microsoft’s operating system has been the most popular one for the past 20 years, so it has attracted the most malware. One IT professional told The …
Tom Brewster, 29 May 2014

About to make a big bet? Don't crash out, cash in with the power of maths

Big Data's Big 5 When and how to make change to a successful business or popular website can be a huge risk. Get things right and - at best - nobody notices. Get things wrong, however, and you run the risk of losing business and suffering a damaged reputation. A good recent example is that of film and TV service Netflix, whose fluffed …
Mark Whitehorn, 29 May 2014
nuts

From production to development databases (and back again)

Workshop In many organisations, it isn't just the production database that database administrators (DBAs) have to look after. There are several non-production versions, as well. Project teams may need one to develop on, so that they can work in isolation without affecting production. A QA team may need its own version for testing patches …
Robin Birtstone, 28 May 2014
Bart Simpson

What can The Simpsons teach us about stats algorithms? Glad you asked...

Big Data's Big 5 When his class is asked to give an example of a paradox in The Simpsons, Bart offers: "You're damned if ya' do, and you're damned if ya' don't." The dictionary defines a paradox as an absurd or seemingly absurd or contradictory statement that might prove to be true and when it comes to data a seemingly contradictory situation …
Mark Whitehorn, 28 May 2014
android malware mobile iphone

After the cyberpunks, prepare to fight a new wave of nasties

Presagers of doom in the IT industry have sometimes got it horribly wrong. One need only look back 14 years to the millennium bug, which was supposed to bring down the world’s critical systems. The year 2000 came and went with no digital cataclysm in sight. Even the smartest people make grand claims about imminent threats. …
Tom Brewster, 27 May 2014
yellow measuring tape - black writing

Capacity planning: How to plan ahead and keep your Oracle database healthy

Workshop Crystal balls aren't really good for IT administration. Database administrators (DBAs) like certainty and clarity, and that extends to how much strain their databases will be under in the future. Capacity planning is a way to figure that out. The concept behind capacity planning is simple, but the mechanics are harder. Capacity …
Robin Birtstone, 26 May 2014

The Internet of Things helps insurance firms reward, punish

Solid The more the Internet of Things knows about you, the more that insurance companies are able to slurp that data and incentivize you to walk the straight and narrow. "You know the way that advertising turned out to be the native business model for the internet? I think that insurance is going to be the native business model for …
Rik Myslewski, 23 May 2014

Big data hitting the fan? Nyquist-Shannon TOOL SAMPLE can save you

Big Data's Big 5 You are working on a big data project that collects data from sensors that can be polled every 0.1 of a second. But just because you can doesn’t mean you should, so how do we decide how frequently to poll sensors? The tempting answer is to collect it all, every last ping. That way, not only is your back covered but you can also …
Mark Whitehorn, 23 May 2014
Kirk and Spock contemplate castles built in the air

HP's $1bn 'Linux for the cloud' dream: Will Helion float?

Analysis Hewlett-Packard has committed $1bn to OpenStack, a Linux for the cloud, over the next two years. The cash is going on R&D, products, engineering and services, HP said. The company will iron out the kinks in the OpenStack code and make it work and try to sniff out OpenStack clouds on HP hardware out of the box. To grease up the …
Gavin Clarke, 23 May 2014
A road train parked up at Waukhope

How technology tracks parcels every step of the way

A lot has changed since the '80s. Back in the day, your product arrived when it arrived, often within weeks rather than days and you didn’t get the chance to check where it was. In time you could see your product entering and leaving locations en route, enabling you to track it from city to city as it made its way to you. Now in …
Robin Birtstone, 22 May 2014