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Ryan Reynolds dangles off a helicopter for BT

BT's Ryan Reynolds helicopter Wi-Fi ads 'misleading', thunders ad watchdog

The UK Advertising Standards Authority has rapped BT on the knuckles for claiming its Smart Hub delivered "the UK's most powerful Wi‑Fi signal". Following a barrage of complaints from competitors and the general public, the watchdog ruled that the telco broke 12 ASA rules with its series of ads, featuring Deadpool star Ryan …
Gareth Corfield, 14 Jun 2017

Just days after tech community abandons plans to punish internet shutdowns… Egypt goes censorship crazy

Egypt has embarked on a new wave of online censorship, blocking news websites and killing off VPN services in order to limit its citizens' access to information. Over the past three weeks, the Egyptian authorities have blocked access to more than 50 news websites, including Al Jazeera and local newspapers Daily News Egypt, Al- …
Kieren McCarthy, 13 Jun 2017

Farewell, slumping 40Gbps Ethernet, we hardly knew ye

Analyst firm IDC reckons the world's Ethernet switch market laid on 3.3 per cent growth year-on-year for the first quarter of 2017, up to US$5.66 billion. At the same time, however, the service provider router market bore out what you'd expect if you've been watching Cisco's indifferent performances of late – it slipped by 3.7 …

Two leading ladies of Europe warn that internet regulation is coming

The two most powerful women in Europe still have their eyes firmly on internet regulation. Fresh from her failure in the UK general election, still-prime minister Theresa May used her first public address announcing a new coalition government to stress that she will continue her self-declared "cracking down on the ideology of …
Kieren McCarthy, 12 Jun 2017

Situation normal, blurts T-Mobile, while network continues to crap itself

Word of T-Mobile US outages has reached customers, social media, support representatives and The Register – just not the network's marketing team. A T-Mobile spokesperson told The Register in an email at 13:30 BST on 12 June that "all is operating normally". But El Reg spoke with two support staff who confirmed that there are …
Andrew Silver, 12 Jun 2017
cloud

Cumulus Networks adds validation with NetQ

Cumulus Networks reckons netadmins need more than ping and traceroute to understand large-scale data centre networks, and is hoping its NetQ offering will fill that role. Originally designed for its own Cumulus Linux distribution, the company's decided the NetQ telemetry, diagnostics, and validation software deserved broader …

Peplink patches SD-WAN routers

SD-WAN company Peplink has patched its load-balancing routers against vulnerabilities turned up by a German pentest company. The bugs discovered by X41 Security centre, as is so often the case, around the products' Web admin interface, with seven individual bugs reported (CVE-2017-8835 to CVE-2017-8841). The vulnerabilities …
NBN Logo

If you live in a network lab, you'll get gigabit NBN over HFC soon

If you build a hybrid-fibre coax network in a lab, nbn™ says it can support 1 Gbps down / 100 Mbps up performance. Never mind that the actual HFC networks nbn™ will use have spent years hanging off poles and have to deal with real-world problems like contention, nbn™ wants us to know it's made HFC go very fast so it can show …
The Reg's WiFi4EU logo

EU wins approval to waste €120m on pitiful public Wi-Fi

Opinion A group of European governing institutions has approved a programme to invest €120m (£105m, $134.7m) in public Wi-Fi hotspots in over 6,000 municipalities in all European Union member states by 2020. The WiFi4EU initiative, first proposed last September, is a stern disregard for recent history – which has seen the closure of …
ViaSat2

ViaSat lofts world's most powerful communications satellite into orbit

American comms specialist ViaSat is set to put the world's most powerful communications satellite into orbit on Thursday afternoon atop an Ariane rocket. The launch – scheduled for 1645 PDT (Friday 2345 UTC) from the Guiana Space Centre in French Guiana – will see the 6,418kg (14,149lb) Boeing-built ViaSat 2 sent up into …
Iain Thomson, 01 Jun 2017
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Giffgaff 'roam like at home' package means £1/min calls in Jersey

Giffgaff customers may want to think twice before holidaying in tax havens such as the Channel Islands as new roaming charges will hike calls back to Blighty to £1 per minute – up from the current 0.5p rate. From 14 June, the mobile virtual network operator will allow customers to roam in the EU and use their allowances as …
Kat Hall, 01 Jun 2017
Burning money

Extreme Networks confirms it's buying Avaya's network biz

Avaya and Extreme Networks have confirmed that the former will sell its networking business to the latter, for “approximately US$100m”. The two flagged the deal in March, but because Avaya was courting other bids it's taken a while for Extreme to be confirmed as the buyer. Now both companies have emitted canned statements …
Simon Sharwood, 01 Jun 2017
The Reg's WiFi4EU logo

Europe to splash €120m on free WiFi for ~8,000 villages and cities

The European Parliament, Council and Commission have all decided that the in-El Reg's-view-inexplicable WiFi4EU project is a fine idea worthy of €120m to ensure “every European village and every city with free wireless internet ac­cess around the main centres of public life by 2020." The agreement between the Parliament, …
Simon Sharwood, 31 May 2017

Millimetre wave.. omigerd it's going nowherrr.. Apple, you say?

Comment Apple may not be the invincible force it once was in mobile, but it is still unrivalled in its ability to scatter stardust over new technologies – just ask the companies which struggled to push Wi-Fi Calling or wireless charging into the mainstream before the iPhone maker came along. Now it has kindled new sparks of enthusiasm, …
Wireless Watch, 30 May 2017
A beaver chewing down a tree

New 'Beaver' web server has exactly ONE user outside China

Netcraft's monthly survey of web-facing computers has turned up an oddity: a new web server called “Beaver” that's used by exactly one web site outside China. “Just over a million sites now exhibit the Beaver Server header, and these make use of more than 110,000 unique domain names – mostly under the .cn top-level domain,” …
Simon Sharwood, 29 May 2017
Cat attacking

Arista-cats win some, lose some against Cisco

Both Cisco and Arista have claimed victory in the latest instalment of their intellectual property lawsuit. The punch-and-counterpunch case dates back to 2014, when Switchzilla sued the then-startup for patent violations and over the copyright attached to its command-line interface (CLI). While trying to fend off the …

T-Mobile goes Apple/Google route by separating phone numbers and devices

T-Mobile is taking a leaf out of the tech industry book and separating phones from their numbers. The company's Digits service will allow you to pick up calls from any device – in much the same way Google does with its voice service and Apple does with its AppleID. It will launch on May 31. The service has been in beta for …
Kieren McCarthy, 25 May 2017

US citizens complain their names were used for FCC robo-comments

Fourteen Americans (with the help of an advocacy group) are complaining to the FCC that their names were used without permission to file fake comments on the proposed net neutrality overhaul. A letter [PDF] sent to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai and signed by the 14 people claims that their names and addresses were used to post …
Shaun Nichols, 25 May 2017

Venezuela increases internet censorship and surveillance in crisis

Venezuela is increasingly censoring its internet and expanding online surveillance of citizens. The country is currently in a state of emergency after two months of anti-government protests that have caused the deaths of over 50 people and led to violent confrontations with the police. Citizens are furious with president …
Kieren McCarthy, 25 May 2017

NSA takes one-two punch to the face

The US National Security Agency has been hit by two legal losses that may put the last part of its controversial spying program on US citizens under threat. In one case, brought by customers of AT&T and run by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), the NSA was ordered [PDF] to provide relevant evidence that would prove or …
Kieren McCarthy, 23 May 2017

Comcast accused of siccing lawyers on net neutrality foe

An activist group says it was threatened by Comcast lawyers after it pointed out the cable giant's efforts to astroturf the FCC with fake comments on net neutrality. Fight for the Future, a self-described digital rights group opposed to the FCC's planned net neutrality overhaul, says the US cable giant's lawyers have been …
Shaun Nichols, 23 May 2017

House GOP takes crack at ISP privacy bill

The US Representatives who just weeks ago repealed privacy rules for ISPs now want to enact a new set of restrictions. Tennessee Republican rep Marsha Blackburn is sponsoring the bill [PDF], known cheekily as the "Balancing the Rights of Web Surfers Equally and Responsibly (or BROWSER) Act of 2017." The bill would explicitly …
Shaun Nichols, 22 May 2017
Fibre, image via Shutterstock

Constellations and MIMO to take fibre to a future beyond the terabit

Interview A technology that first hit the mass market in 1990s-era modems running over voice networks will soon be boosting submarine fibre speeds around the world. So says Dr Laurent Schmalen, Department Head, Coding for Optical Networks, at Nokia Bell Labs, who chatted to Vulture South about “constellation shaping” and the future of …
An ambulance

T-Mobile USA sued by parents after their baby dies amid 911 meltdown

A Texas mother is suing T‑Mobile USA, alleging technical issues with the carrier prevented her child from getting urgent medical care, which led to his death. Bridget Alex says that the telco's problems with "ghost calls" left the babysitter of her six-month-old son unable to reach the city's emergency services in time to save …
Shaun Nichols, 11 May 2017
jeremy_corbyn_648

10Mbps universal speeds? We'll give you 30Mbps, pleads Labour in leaked manifesto

The UK Labour Party has pledged a 30Mbps universal broadband speed by 2022, according to a draft leaked version of its manifesto. The current universal service obligation has been set at 10Mbps by 2020, with a proposed amendment of 30Mbps by the House of Lords having been dropped in the recently passed Digital Economy Act. …
Kat Hall, 11 May 2017

DSL inventor's latest science project: terabit speeds over copper

John Cioffi, known as the “father of DSL”, reckons we're nowhere near the limit of copper transmission speed, delivering a presentation claiming Terabit performance is feasible. Feasible with a bunch of caveats, that is, the two most important of which are “if research delivers on theory”, and “if it can be standardised”. The …
F-22 Raptor

US Air Force networks F-15 and F-22 fighters – in flight!

The United States Air Force has successfully networked its F-22 Raptor and F-15 Eagle aircraft under the “Talon HATE” program. The F-15 first flew in 1972 and has been in service since the late 1970s, while the F-22 entered service two decades later. The latter aircraft had some data networking capabilities, but the F-15's …
Simon Sharwood, 09 May 2017

ITC upholds finding that Arista infringed on two Cisco patents

The US International Trade Commission has upheld a judgement that Arista Networks infringed two Cisco Systems patents on networking equipment - the latest round in a long-running legal battle between the companies. In a judgement last week, the federal agency called for an import ban and a cease and desist order on related …
Kat Hall, 08 May 2017

There be dragons? Why net neutrality groups won't go to Congress

Special report When Obama pushed the FCC into extending Title II rules over US internet services in 2014, I described the President as "writing out a cheque he knew he couldn't cash". To no one's surprise, that cheque bounced last week, when the FCC chairman formally began the process to replace those rules. Title II has been a dead duck …
Andrew Orlowski, 08 May 2017

Is Britain really worse at 4G than Peru?

Special Report Which? magazine's claim that the UK has "worse 4G than Peru", widely reported by the national media this week, has reopened an highly charged industry debate about the reliability of network data collection. The debate can be crudely summed as “crowd vs non crowd”, but actually goes deeper: does enough "Big Data" from a large …
Andrew Orlowski, 05 May 2017
Buffering icon

ISPs must ensure half of punters get advertised max speeds

Broadband providers may have to ensure at least half of customers can receive advertised top line speeds, under a proposed crackdown on consumers being misled. Current standards require speeds quoted in broadband adverts to apply to a minimum of 10 per cent of all customers, providing they include the words "up to". It …
Kat Hall, 04 May 2017

Cisco waves swatter at ten new vulnerabilities

Universal Plug-and-Play remains a gift-that-keeps-on-giving for infosec researchers, with Cisco announcing a critical vulnerability in the software that plagues its CVR100W wireless VPN router. Because the CVR100W doesn't fully range-check UPnP input data, an attacker can crash the device, possibly getting access to a root …

324 typo-squat domains found impersonating Natwest, HSBC and co

Hackers are abusing the trademarked names of five of the UK's top high street banks. Security researchers at DomainTools have identified 324 "high risk" domains mimicking Barclays, HSBC, Natwest, Lloyds and Standard Chartered. Crooks often use domains masquerading as legitimate brands to run phishing scams that trick …
John Leyden, 03 May 2017

Former RCL director: It was me who cancelled their domain names

Former London biz Retro Computers Ltd’s sales agent Nick Cooper has admitted he is the man who bought two of the company’s domain names and pointed them at sites critical of the company. He is currently being sued by it over an unrelated matter. Yesterday we reported that RCL had lost control of the two domains, zxvega.co.uk …
Gareth Corfield, 03 May 2017

Transatlantic link typo by Sweden's Telia broke Cloudflare in the US

A fat-fingered human accidentally broke a transatlantic internet backbone that knackered Cloudflare's content delivery network in the US. Cloudflare – which props up loads of big names online – said that over the course of about fifteen minutes on Tuesday morning, it suffered a slowdown in traffic, meaning connections to …
Shaun Nichols, 02 May 2017

Sun sets on eight domain names managed by CentralNic

Owners of domain names at several extensions, including .gb.com, will no longer be able to use their registered sites as of this week, with reseller CentralNic having told customers those domains have been "sunset". The company informed customers that eight domain extensions had been "sunsetted", meaning that new registrations …
Kat Hall, 02 May 2017
tanami_desert_near_willowra_648

Up Wolf Creek without a signal: outback cable cut disconnects top end TPG, Optus customers

A cut to a Nextgen Networks fibre is cutting off Northern Territory Optus and TPG customers north of Katherine. Since TPG also owns the iiNet and Internode brands, customers of those service providers are also affected. iiNet identifies the start of the outage as yesterday on its status page, 4:19 pm Western Standard Time. At …
Image by Christian Mueller http://www.shutterstock.com/gallery-679411p1.html

M6 crowned crappiest motorway for 4G signal

The M6 is officially the UK's worst motorway for 4G coverage. Global Wireless Solutions clocked up almost a million data points to find a winner and loser. On average Britain’s linear car parks, er, motorways only maintain an LTE signal 62 per cent of the time. But the M6, originally built for ferrying northerners to Cup …
Team Register, 28 Apr 2017
Fast Cloud

A switch with just 49 ns latency? What strange magic is this?

Australian company Exablaze has released a switch with claimed latency of just 49 nanoseconds. The ExaLINK Fusion FastMux is designed for those who can't wait for data to make it through a box, especially high-frequency traders but also HPC types. The device isn't a switch to rank with the likes of Cisco or Arista, because it …
Simon Sharwood, 27 Apr 2017
Solar storm - Shutterstock

Fistful of flaws blow away SolarWinds network appliances

Admins of SolarWinds system management systems can block out a biggish chunk of their diaries to implement a bunch of serious patches. There are five bugs of varying seriousness in the company's Log and Event Manager appliance discovered by KoreLogic and posted to Full Disclosure. Four of the bugs depend on an attacker …
FTP

FTP becoming Forgotten Transfer Protocol as Debian turns it off

Debian is shutting down its public File Transfer Protocol (FTP) services, because hardly anybody uses them any more and they're hard to operate and maintain. The project has told world+dog that come November 1st, 2017, ftp://ftp.debian.org and ftp://security.debian.org will cease operations. The reasons are pretty simple: …
Simon Sharwood, 27 Apr 2017
A hand holding an axe in shadow

HPE kills off its entire OpenSDN line, pulls plug on customer demos

Exclusive Hewlett Packard Enterprise has quietly axed its OpenSDN suite, effective immediately. Its sales staff have been instructed to shut down customer demos and proof-of-concept installations. IT buyers will be told to try other gear if they want to evaluate and roll out software-defined networking. HPE workers have also been …
Shaun Nichols, 26 Apr 2017

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