The Week in Summary

Apple slapped hard with $440m patent bill in VirnetX FaceTime spat

An American patent-holding biz says it will bag a $440m windfall from Apple in a long-running infringement case that seems unlikely to end any time soon.
Shaun Nichols, 16 Oct 2017

Dying! Yahoo! loses! fight! to! lock! dead! man's! dead! account!

Yahoo! may be compelled to hand over the contents of a dead man's email account to his surviving family, Massachusetts's top court has ruled.
Shaun Nichols, 16 Oct 2017
finger pointing

Review pins blame for Medicare ID breach on you. All of you

Comment The Australian government's review of an incident that saw health care customer numbers offered for sale on a Tor “darknet” site has recommended retaining the numbers as acceptable proof of identity.
Australian money at a crime scene

Deloitte to wind up Plutus Payroll, promises contact with contractors 'within 20 biz days'

The Supreme Court of the Australian State of New South Wales has appointed liquidators to Plutus Payroll, the payroll services provider that lured thousands of IT contractors with a free service but has since been alleged to be a tax-skimming scam.
Simon Sharwood, 16 Oct 2017
6

Never mind the WPA2 drama... Details emerge of TPM key cockup that hits tonnes of devices

RSA keys produced by smartcards, security tokens, laptops, and other devices using cryptography chips made by Infineon Technologies are weak and crackable – and should be regenerated with stronger algorithms.
John Leyden, 16 Oct 2017
stars
8

Neutron stars shower gold on universe in big bang, felt on Earth as 100-second grav wave

Barely two years after it came online, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) has scored a double success. Last week, the instrument earned its creators a Nobel Prize – and this week we're told it helped spot the first neutron star collision from both its gravitational wave and radiation emissions.
Iain Thomson, 16 Oct 2017
Arcady http://www.shutterstock.com/gallery-450076p1.html

Google isn't saying Microsoft security sucks but Chrome for Windows has its own antivirus

In its ongoing effort to improve browser security, school Microsoft on security, and retain its search audience, Google is today rolling out several Chrome for Windows fortifications.
Thomas Claburn, 16 Oct 2017
California
7

Super Cali goes ballistic, small-cell law is bogus. School IT outsourcing is also... quite atrocious

California Governor Jerry Brown has vetoed a state bill that would have allowed telcos to put up loads of small-cell antennas, and thus boost phone coverage, against city officials' wishes.
Shaun Nichols, 16 Oct 2017

Here's a timeless headline: Adobe rushes out emergency Flash fix after hacker exploits bug

Adobe today issued an emergency security patch for Flash, which squashes a bug being used in the wild right now by hackers to infect Windows PCs with spyware.
Iain Thomson, 16 Oct 2017
9

Ernst & Young slapped with £1.8 MEEEELLION fine for crap accounting

Ernst & Young is nursing a £1.8m fine from the Financial Reporting Council (FRC) after admitting to "misconduct" when auditing 2012 P&L accounts for distributor Tech Data that were later found to contain material mistakes.
Paul Kunert, 16 Oct 2017

Supreme Court to rule on whether US has right to data stored overseas

The US Supreme Court has agreed to hear a dispute over whether Microsoft should release personal emails stored in Ireland to America's federal government.
Andrew Silver, 16 Oct 2017

Toshiba raises dread spectre of working with SK Hynix on flash fab

Toshiba could partner with SK Hynix on flash foundry operations, implying the WDC joint venture could have a finite shelf life.
Chris Mellor, 16 Oct 2017

Brit intel fingers Iran for brute-force attacks on UK.gov email accounts

Iran has been blamed for the brute-force attack on UK Parliament earlier this year.
John Leyden, 16 Oct 2017
7

Ethereum blockchain is sailing to Byzantium – hard fork up and running

The latest upgrade to the popular Ethereum blockchain protocol – Byzantium –went live today, adding additional privacy and performance features.
Andrew Silver, 16 Oct 2017
Massive human has key to little person's house.

Huge power imbalance between firms and users whose info they grab

Mass commercial data gathering and opaque decision-making processes have a “massive potential” to damage personal autonomy and dignity, a report has said.
Rebecca Hill, 16 Oct 2017

Keep your voice down in the data centre, the HDDs have ears! I SAID, KEEP...

It must be one of the worst ways to build a microphone imaginable, tapping into a disk drive's nanosecond head stops as it waits for the vibrations caused by sound to cease, but it has been done.
Chris Mellor, 16 Oct 2017

Customers cheesed off after card details nicked in Pizza Hut data breach

Miscreants have made off with payment card details of "a small number of clients" following a data breach at Pizza Hut.
Kat Hall, 16 Oct 2017
Little girl embraces robot. Photo by Shutterstock

Boffins suggest UK needs an 'AI council' but regulation is for squares

Boffins have recommended the British government establishes a council to oversee and coordinate artificial intelligence across the private and public sectors.
Rebecca Hill, 16 Oct 2017

Huawei dunks server triplets in Skylake for a v5 refresh

Huawei has refreshed three third generation modular rack server products from older Xeons to Skylake processors with a v5 refresh giving them updated networking and storage options.
Chris Mellor, 16 Oct 2017

Remember how you said it was cool if your mobe network sold your name, number and location?

US mobile phone companies appear to be selling their customers' private data – including their full name, phone number, contract details, home zip code and current location to third parties – all in the name of security.
Kieren McCarthy, 16 Oct 2017
Wi-fi symbol made out of clouds. Photo by Shutterstock

WPA2 KRACK attack smacks Wi-Fi security: Fundamental crypto crapto

Users are urged to continue using WPA2 pending the availability of a fix, experts have said, as a security researcher went public with more information about a serious flaw in the security protocol.
John Leyden, 16 Oct 2017

Xperia XZ1: Sony spies with its MotionEye something beginning...

Review You know where you are with a Sony - this year’s are much like last year’s. And the year before that.
Andrew Orlowski, 16 Oct 2017
Pennies in a jar. Photo via Shutterstock
7

UK.gov: Who wants £25m... *cheers*... to trial 5G? *crickets chirping*

The British government is looking for places to chuck £25m it has set aside for 5G trials.
Kat Hall, 16 Oct 2017
4

SendGrid services are DOWN and OUT of action

Anyone wanting to log in or sign up to cloud-based email marketing service SendGrid is out of luck as an unspecificed glitch has taken its services offline.
Andrew Silver, 16 Oct 2017

Grant Shapps of coup shame fame stands by 'broadbad' research

Interview Grant Shapps seems far from crestfallen after his disastrous attempt to lead a coup against UK Prime Minister Theresa May.
Kat Hall, 16 Oct 2017
Old man's hands typing on laptop
4

With microservices Java can at last join us in our cloudy, DevOpsy world

Microservices aren't a new concept to Java – their forerunner was Service Oriented Architectures (SOA), which could be constructed, among other means, with the assistance of Enterprise JavaBeans (EJBs).
Trevor Pott, 16 Oct 2017
elon musk

Elon Musk says Harry Potter and Bob the Builder will get SpaceX flying to Mars

SpaceX, Tesla and Boring Company CEO Elon Musk has suggested Bob the Builder and Harry Potter will help his space exploration efforts.
Simon Sharwood, 16 Oct 2017

Linus Torvalds lauds fuzzing for improving Linux security

Linus Torvalds release notification for Linux 4.14's fifth release candidate contains an interesting aside: the Linux Lord says fuzzing is making a big difference to the open source operating system.
Simon Sharwood, 16 Oct 2017
Eindhoven's winning solar Cruiser

Storms decimated 2017 Solar Challenge field

The Reg didn't physically follow this year's Solar Challenge, the biennial solar car race across Australia's dead, red heart. But we did follow this year's event, in which unfavourable weather meant this year's field didn't even get the chance to set speed records.
Assange

Assange thanks USA for forcing him to invest in booming Bitcoin

Endurance couch-surfer and WikiLeaker-in-chief Julian Assange has thanked US authorities for the banking blockade that made it hard to donate fiat currencies to his organisation, because it inadvertently enriched the organisation.
Simon Sharwood, 16 Oct 2017
Car stolen - Shutterstock

'Open sesame'... Subaru key fobs vulnerable, says engineer

A Dutch electronics engineer reckons Japanese auto-maker Subaru isn't acting on a key-fob cloning vulnerability he discovered.
8

'Cyber kangaroo' ratings for IoT security? Jump to it, says Australia's cyber security minister

Australia's government hopes that somewhere in the world, a vendor of consumer-grade connected electronics is willing to admit it's rubbish at security by giving itself a low score in a proposed safety rating system.
Smart oven

WPA2 security in trouble as KRACK Belgian boffins tease key reinstallation bug

Updated A promo for the upcoming Association for Computing Machinery security conference has set infosec types all a-Twitter over the apparent cryptographic death of the WPA2 authentication scheme widely used to secure Wi-Fi connections.
drone

Drone smacks commercial passenger plane in Canada

Canada's transport minster has told drone operators to stay away from airports after a remotely piloted craft bonked a passenger plane during its final approach to Jean Lesage International Airport in Québec City.
Simon Sharwood, 16 Oct 2017
Twitter flock

Twitter to be 'aggressive' enforcer of new, stronger rules

Twitter has reacted to last week's criticism arising from its suspension of actor actress Rose McGowan's account, after she strongly criticised alleged sex fiend Harvey Weinstein – by announcing it will soon implement and aggressively police new community standards.
Simon Sharwood, 16 Oct 2017
Headphones too loud

Sounds painful: Audio code bug lets users, apps get root on Linux

An advisory from Cisco issued last Friday, October 13th gave us the heads-up on a local privilege escalation vulnerability in the Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA).
Dice, photo via Shutterstock
1

An oil industry hacker facing jail, a $20m damages bill, and claims of counter-hacking

Analysis David Kent, of Spring, Texas, USA, was sentenced to prison earlier this month for hacking Rigzone.com, a oil and gas industry website he founded and sold to employment data biz DHI Group, in an effort to build a second site, Oilpro.com, into an acquisition target.
Thomas Claburn, 14 Oct 2017
holland

Microsoft faces Dutch crunch over Windows 10 private data slurp

Yet another European nation is turning up the heat on Microsoft for extracting heaps and heaps of telemetry and other intelligence from Windows 10 PCs.
Shaun Nichols, 14 Oct 2017
Oops icon

Has Git ever driven you so mad you wanted to bomb it? Well, now you can with this tiny repo

A quirk in the way Git handles data deduplication can be exploited to crash most computers with a single Git command.
Shaun Nichols, 14 Oct 2017
Cyber

US Congress mulls first 'hack back' revenge law. And yup, you can guess what it'll let people do

Two members of the US House of Representatives today introduced a law bill that would allow hacking victims to seek revenge and hack the hackers who hacked them.
Iain Thomson, 13 Oct 2017

FCC Commissioner blasts new TV standard as a 'household tax'

Jessica Rosenworcel, a commissioner at America's broadcast watchdog the FCC, has criticized a proposed set of TV standards as a "household tax," due to its lack of backwards compatibility.
Kieren McCarthy, 13 Oct 2017
PWX_image

IT at sea makes data too easy to see: Ships are basically big floating security nightmares

If there's anything worse than container security, it would appear to be container ship security.
Thomas Claburn, 13 Oct 2017

Facebook, Twitter slammed for deleting evidence of Russia's US election mischief

Facebook and Twitter have come under attack for deleting tens of thousands of posts that may provide vital clues to how and to what extent the Russian government was able to able to influence the US presidential elections.
Kieren McCarthy, 13 Oct 2017

Pulitzer-winning website Politifact hacked to mine crypto-coins in browsers

Updated Politifact, the Pulitzer Prize-winning website devoted to checking the factual accuracy of US politicians' words, appears to have been hacked so that it secretly mines cryptocurrency in visitors' browsers.
Iain Thomson, 13 Oct 2017
IK Multimedia AmpliTube on GarageBand

GarageBanned: Apple's music app silenced in iOS 11 iCloud blunder

Apple is working on a fix for a bug in iOS 11 that prevents some peeps from running GarageBand.
Shaun Nichols, 13 Oct 2017
chess cheating
1

Quantum's rook-ey move, software pawns and is cheque in mail for tape?

Storage roundup At the end of this week we can lift the lid just a little on Quantum's mystery Castle storage project, say that the latest 12TB LTO tape format is coming nearer and add a few tidbits about GPDR, NAS in the cloud and Tintri array automation.
Chris Mellor, 13 Oct 2017
A Parrot Bebop 2 drone. File picture

Essex drone snapper dealt with by police for steamy train photos

A drone photographer who took pictures of the Tornado steam engine has been given a community punishment by Essex Police in the UK – after Network Rail complained his craft was being flown too close to a railway line.
Gareth Corfield, 13 Oct 2017
Boxer_blow
6

Bloodied and broken AFA pioneer Violin picks itself up and tries again

Analysis Violin Systems, the renamed Violin Memory, is like a boxer who could have been a contender and is now chasing redemption, getting up off the floor after what should have been a knockout blow.
Chris Mellor, 13 Oct 2017
lock

Android ransomware DoubleLocker encrypts data and changes PINs

Crooks have come up with a strain of Android ransomware that both encrypts user data and locks victims out of compromised devices by changing PINs.
John Leyden, 13 Oct 2017

Beardy Branson chucks cash at His Muskiness' Hyperloop idea

Richard Branson, the billionaire behind the Virgin brand, has reportedly invested an undisclosed sum in Elon Musk’s barmy Hyperloop supersonic tube train project, seemingly competing with the billionaire ideas man's own firm.
Gareth Corfield, 13 Oct 2017

Uber begins appeals process to claw back taxi licence in London

Londoners can keep on using the Uber ride-hailing app. For now.
Andrew Silver, 13 Oct 2017
Privacy

Dear America, you can't steal a personality: GDPR godfather talks privacy with El Reg

Interview "Now I've heard that one before. Let me think, where was it... Ah yes. It was Google!"
Andrew Orlowski, 13 Oct 2017
Man gets tie stuck in paper shredder...

BOFH: Oh dear. Did someone get lost on the Audit Trail?

Episode 13 So I'm walking down the corridor from Mission Control with about a ream of financial paperwork when I notice the Boss coming the other way with the IT Director in tow - never a good sign.
Simon Travaglia, 13 Oct 2017

Co-op Bank's users moan over online wobbles

Updated The Co-op Bank's online service appears to be experiencing wobbles as customers complain they can't get in.
Andrew Silver, 13 Oct 2017
No, just stop. Nope. photo by shutterstock

Scouse marketing scamps scalped £70k for 100,000+ nuisance calls

A firm promising to generate leads for businesses has been fined £70,000 for making more than 100,000 nuisance calls – although it has denied using automatic dialling.
Rebecca Hill, 13 Oct 2017

Toshiba: Dear Western Digital. Let's talk flash fab moolah

Toshiba says it is now talking to Western Digital about joint investment in a flash fab development.
Chris Mellor, 13 Oct 2017
A beaver chewing down a tree

I love disruptive computer jargon. It's so very William Burroughs

Something for the Weekend, Sir? Would you mind leveraging a time unit while I ideate my ecosystem?
Alistair Dabbs, 13 Oct 2017
Robot reading photo via Shutterstock
9

Do you Word2Vec? Google's neural-network bookworm

Several years back, the Google "Brain Team" that was behind Tensorflow hatched another novel neural tool: Word2Vec.
Andrew Cobley, 13 Oct 2017
Big bill

Beware the GDPR 'no win, no fee ambulance chasers' – experts

The UK's incoming data protection laws could bring with them a wave of "no win, no fee"-style companies, experts have said.
Rebecca Hill, 13 Oct 2017
The meat ingredients for our WHO neckfiller

Culture, schmulture. DevOps, agile need to be software-first again

"The talks get a little repetitive, don't they?" she said as we were walking out of the elevator and through the lobby, escaping the latest two-day DevOpsDays nerd fest. Unable to resist the urge to mansplain, I meekly volunteered that most of the attendees are first-timers, so, you know, maybe it's new to them.
Michael Cote, 13 Oct 2017
Resignation letter
4

Samsung Electronics CEO resigns over bribery scandal

Samsung Electronics vice-chairman and CEO Kwon Oh-hyun has announced his resignation, citing the “unprecedented crisis” of the bribery scandal that saw Samsung vice-chairman Lee Jae-yong jailed for bribery.
Simon Sharwood, 13 Oct 2017
Upside down user

Software update turned my display and mouse upside-down, says user

On-Call Welcome again to On-Call, The Register's weekly wander through readers' recollections of tech support traumas.
Simon Sharwood, 13 Oct 2017
Swiss army knife in cloud

Cisco's ACI adds multi-site support, multi-cloud coming next year

Cisco's popped out version 3.0 of its software-defined networking Application Centric Infrastructure (ACI) product, but there's a more significant update coming early next year.
Simon Sharwood, 13 Oct 2017
Grafeas diagram from Google

Google Grafeas can handle the truth: Web giant and pals emit tool to wrangle containers

Managing software applications in large organizations can be quite complicated, particularly for codebases with lots of dependencies.
Thomas Claburn, 13 Oct 2017
A handful of euro 1 cent coins

More and more websites are mining crypto-coins in your browser to pay their bills, line pockets

Updated Sketchy websites are increasingly using cryptocurrency mining as a source of income.
John Leyden, 13 Oct 2017

Equifax's malvertising scare, Chromebook TPM RSA key panic, Cuban embassy sonic weapon heard at last – and more

Roundup We almost wanted to feel sorry for Equifax, were it not for the fact that the credit biz takes to IT security like a duck to an acid bath. After a brutal few weeks under the spotlight, on Wednesday night it suffered another hacking scare.
Chris Williams, 13 Oct 2017
European Union cloud
3

Citrix switches on nuage français, deutsche wolke, nube española

Citrix has opened a new cloud region somewhere inside the European Union.
Simon Sharwood, 13 Oct 2017
Trying to catch money in a net
5

Juniper warns of bitter 3rd quarter due to cloud sales crash

Juniper Networks has issued preliminary results for its third quarter and the news is bad: forecast revenue of between US$1,290m and $1,350m won't happen and the company instead believes it will score between $1,250m and $1,260m.
Simon Sharwood, 13 Oct 2017
Angry-looking woman croses her arms and glares. Pic by Shutterstock
1

Boring Barracuda says sales are going swimmingly – again

It's getting predictable. Barracuda has posted yet another year-on-year revenue rise with yet another small profit. Boring is good, though, right?
Chris Mellor, 13 Oct 2017

Twitter: Why we silenced Rose McGowan after she slammed alleged sex pest Harvey Weinstein

Analysis Twitter was today accused of censorship after it froze the account of actress Rose McGowan – who had just publicly slammed alleged sex fiend Harvey Weinstein.
Kieren McCarthy, 12 Oct 2017

It's Patch Blues-day: Bad October Windows updates trigger BSODs

Microsoft's October batch of security patches and bug fixes caused some corporate PCs to suffer blue-screen-of-death crashes when starting up this week.
Shaun Nichols, 12 Oct 2017

Crappy upload speeds a thing of the past in fresh broadband 'net spec

It's become so common that it virtually defines current internet usage: fast download speeds and relatively slow uploads.
Kieren McCarthy, 12 Oct 2017
Hyatt

Malware again checks into Hyatt's hotels, again checks out months later with victims' credit cards

Hyatt has provided the perfect excuse for folks trying to explain to bosses or spouses why a film they watched in their hotel room for just seven minutes appeared on their company or personal credit card.
Iain Thomson, 12 Oct 2017
6

I picked the wrong week to quit sniffing Gluon: Amazon, Microsoft hope easy AI dev tool sticks

Amazon and Microsoft on Thursday rolled out open-source software called Gluon in the stated hope of simplifying the implementation of machine learning.
Thomas Claburn, 12 Oct 2017
Pure Jongo S3 multiroom speaker system

Neglected Pure Connect speaker app silenced in iOS 11's war on 32-bit

Wireless speaker maker Pure appears to be more the first casualties in Apple's war on 32-bit iOS apps.
Shaun Nichols, 12 Oct 2017

Screw the badgers! Irish High Court dismisses Apple bit barn appeals

Ireland's High Court has dismissed planning appeals preventing the construction of Apple's County Galway data centre, Reuters reports.
Andrew Silver, 12 Oct 2017

Open source sets sights on killing WhatsApp and Slack

Exclusive The company that writes the open-source software for three-quarters of the world's Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP) email servers has a plan that could kill off proprietary chat services like Facebook's WhatsApp. And that means you, too, Slack.
Andrew Orlowski, 12 Oct 2017
A DJI Phantom 4 with camera detail. Pic: Shutterstock

Whose drone is that? DJI unveils UAV traffic tracking system

DJI, the Chinese drone firm, is launching its own Wi-Fi based drone identification and tracking system, Aeroscope, aimed at placating regulators who want to put limits on small drone flights.
Gareth Corfield, 12 Oct 2017

OnePlus privacy shock: So, the cool Chinese smartphones slurp an alarming amount of data

OnePlus mobiles are phoning home rather detailed information about handsets without any obvious permission or warnings, setting off another debate about what information our smartphones are emitting.
John Leyden, 12 Oct 2017
The Lovell Telescope, credit Mike Peel; Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester

Top of the radio charts: Jodrell Bank goes for UNESCO World Heritage status

Jodrell Bank is going forward for nomination as a World Heritage Site early in 2018.
Kat Hall, 12 Oct 2017
MAMR

Western Dig's MAMR is so phat, it'll store 100TB on a hard drive by 2032

WDC has given up on heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) and is developing a microwave-assisted technique (MAMR) to push disk drive capacity up to 100TB by the 2030s.
Chris Mellor, 12 Oct 2017

Alibaba's Jack Ma says: Relax, we're too wise for robots to take our jobs

Everybody chill. Alibaba founder Jack Ma says we don't need to worry about robots taking our jobs. Phewee.
Andrew Silver, 12 Oct 2017
Register Lecture Picture

Reg Lecture examines why Hacker Hate trumps Techno Love

Techies are often at odds with the world – but nothing matches the venom they save for other geeks foolish enough to devote their lives to other platforms.
Team Register, 12 Oct 2017

UK Treasury Committee chairman calls on Equifax to answer for breach omnishambles

Equifax may soon face the wrath of UK politicians after the chairman of the country's House of Commons Treasury Committee demanded answers from the firm over its handling of its recent data breach.
John Leyden, 12 Oct 2017

Magic hash maths: Dedupe does not have to mean high compute. Wait, what?

Analysis A new and deduping X-IO ISE 900 all-flash array has puzzling puny processors yet kicks out good performance when deduping.
Chris Mellor, 12 Oct 2017

Q. Why's Oracle so two-faced over open source? A. Moolah, wonga, dosh

Oracle loves open source. Except when the database giant hates open source. Which, according to its recent lobbying of the US federal government, seems to be "most of the time".
Matt Asay, 12 Oct 2017
Identical twins in pink and blue suits

Gartner says back-to-school PC sales failed. IDC says they worked

Analyst outfits Gartner and IDC have reached opposing conclusions on the same set of events.
Simon Sharwood, 12 Oct 2017

European Patent Office's document churning snatches Germany's attention: 'We are concerned about quality'

A row has broken out at the European Patent Office over the quality of its work.
Kieren McCarthy, 12 Oct 2017
Avaya CEO Jim Chirico
8

Avaya thinks it's found a new voice, by singing the same old song

INTERVIEW “Avaya”, the company's newly-minted CEO Jim Chirico tells The Register, is “a company that promises solutions for what the customers demand we need to be.”
Simon Sharwood, 12 Oct 2017
Vladimir Putin

Microsoft is Putin a stop to Russian-sanctions-busting IT resellers

Microsoft is investigating how some of its products were sold to businesses and government offices within Russia and Crimea despite strict sanctions against such sales.
Shaun Nichols, 12 Oct 2017
Workday
2

Workday says it's got a PaaS in its pocket and is ready to party

Workday says it's got APIs in its pocket and is ready to join the PaaS party HR-centric enterprise SaaS concern Workday will enter the platform-as-a-service business.
Simon Sharwood, 12 Oct 2017
Intel's 17-qubit quantum chip

Look! Over there! Intel's cooked a 17-qubit chip quantum package

Intel reckons it's stolen a base in the race to build quantum chippery, by shipping a cryogenically-cooled 17-qubit chip to Netherlands-based QuTech.
Visualisation of Haumea's rings

Someone liked dwarf planet Haumea so much they put a ring on it

VIDEO Back in January, a Spanish-led group of astroboffins turned telescopes skywards to watch an occultation of dwarf planet Haumea, and got a surprise.
Shutterstock door knocker

Swiss banking software has Swiss cheese security, says Rapid7

Rapid7 has gone public with news of an e-commerce SQL injection vulnerability, saying it couldn't raise a response from the vendor.
Taipei, Taiwan
6

Fuming Qualcomm smashed with 23 BILLION DOLLAR fine in monopoly abuse probe

Trade officials in Taiwan have hit American chip designer Qualcomm with a NT$23.4bn (US$774m) fine for abusing its dominant position in the wireless electronics world.
Shaun Nichols, 12 Oct 2017
Don't be an idiot

Oz military megahack: When crappy defence contractor cybersecurity 'isn't uncommon', surely alarm bells ring?

While Australia's federal government scrambles to hose down a hacking incident, it's important to ask why a defence contractor of any size could run a network so insecure it exposed default administrative interfaces to the Internet.
Sonos_PLAY_5_Box

Rejecting Sonos' private data slurp basically bricks bloke's boombox

In August, when wireless speaker maker Sonos decided to update its privacy policy to allow it to gather more data on its customers from their devices, it characterized the consequences of refusing to accept the change as being left out of future feature upgrades.
Thomas Claburn, 11 Oct 2017

Dear America, best not share that password with your pals. Lots of love, the US Supremes

A California bloke fighting a computer hacking conviction has lost his final appeal after the US Supreme Court declined to hear his case.
Iain Thomson, 11 Oct 2017
Outlook

Dumb bug of the week: Outlook staples your encrypted emails to, er, plaintext copies when sending messages

Attention anyone using Microsoft Outlook to encrypt emails. Researchers at security outfit SEC Consult have found a bug in Redmond's software that causes encrypted messages to be sent out with their unencrypted versions attached.
Iain Thomson, 11 Oct 2017
Chris Wanstrath at GitHub Universe

'We think autonomous coding is a very real thing' – GitHub CEO imagines a future without programmers

At Pier 70 in San Francisco, California, on Wednesday, where ships once were built, code-hosting biz GitHub held forth on building and shipping code, and on the people who do so.
Thomas Claburn, 11 Oct 2017
Police search

Judge says US govt has 'no right to rummage' through anti-Trump protest website logs

A Washington DC judge has told the US Department of Justice (DoJ) it "does not have the right to rummage" through the files of an anti-Trump protest website – and has ordered the dot-org site's hosting company to protect the identities of its users.
Kieren McCarthy, 11 Oct 2017

Super Cali's futuristic robo-cars in focus – even though watchdogs say they're something quite atrocious

Totally autonomous cars with no drivers, no passengers nor steering wheels are set to roll out onto California's streets under rules proposed by the US state's Department of Motor Vehicles.
Shaun Nichols, 11 Oct 2017

North Korean hackers allegedly probing US utilities for weaknesses

Hackers believed to be from North Korea are casing out US electric companies in preparation for a possible cyber attack – so says security firm FireEye.
John Leyden, 11 Oct 2017
Bear

To Russia, with love: Greek court now says Bitcoin fraud suspect could be tried at home

A judicial appeals court in Thessaloniki, Greece, has backed Moscow's extradition request for Russian citizen and suspected Bitcoin launderer Alexander Vinnik, The Greek Observer reports.
Andrew Silver, 11 Oct 2017
bang_648
1

WDC adds an FAQ to SanDisk-Tosh chip arm wrestling match

WDC is channelling its inner Theodore Roosevelt in its public negotiating stance with Bain Capital and Toshiba.
Chris Mellor, 11 Oct 2017

Give us cash and think about the kids, UK tells Facebook and Twitter

The British government is now proposing a direct tax on social media companies while inviting everyone else to hush and think of the children.
Gareth Corfield, 11 Oct 2017

El Reg was invited to the House of Lords to burst the AI-pocalypse bubble

Comment To Westminster, England, where the House of Lords is conducting a wide-ranging inquiry into artificial intelligence.
Andrew Orlowski, 11 Oct 2017

They've only gone and made a chemical-threat-detecting ring

Smartwatches and Fitbits might be the cool wearables du jour, but they're hardly able to tell you if you're standing in a cloud of noxious chemicals. However, a team of boffins hopes to some day fill this, er, gap in the market with their hip prototype, the broad goal of which is to help keep you alive.
Andrew Silver, 11 Oct 2017
Michael Dell, photo: Dell

Dell makes $1bn bet that IoT at the edge can kill cloud computing takeover

Analysis Dell is going full tilt into the Internet of Things market, setting up a new division and promising to invest $1bn in IoT R&D over three years to build the business.
Chris Mellor, 11 Oct 2017

Don't fear the reap... er, automation: Puppet hopes to make IT boring, says that's a good thing

The revolution will not be televised because IT automation is boring. But it will be scripted and play out unseen, because boring is the desired state for computing infrastructure. Businesses just want their systems to work, without drama or excitement.
Thomas Claburn, 11 Oct 2017
image byemo http://www.shutterstock.com/gallery-2659924p1.html

Sniffing substations will solve 'leccy car charging woes, reckons upstart

A power consumption monitoring startup reckons its substation monitoring technology can be used to help the spread of electric car charging points.
Gareth Corfield, 11 Oct 2017

When Irish data's leaking: Supermarket shoppers urged to check bank statements

Shoppers at SuperValu, Centra and Mace have been told to review their bank statements following a cyber attack against Irish retailer Musgrave.
John Leyden, 11 Oct 2017
Parliament photo by Shutterstock

Concerns raised about privacy, GDPR as Lords peer over Data Protection Bill

Fears over privacy and the application of GDPR, concern over lax rules for spies, and the omission of regulation on fake news, were just some of the issues raised at the second reading of the UK Data Protection House Bill in the House of Lords.

Fear the SAP-slap? Users can anonymously submit questions about licensing naughtiness

SAP is to offer feedback on anonymised indirect licensing as concern and confusion about the rules grows among customers.
Rebecca Hill, 11 Oct 2017
business meeting, debate over data. Photo by shutterstock

IT admins hate this one trick: 'Having something look like it’s on storage, when it is not'

Debate An argument about how to solve the same technical problem has sprung up between two rival startups with plenty of reason to say the other's tech is not up to scratch. But they raise some interesting issues about how to solve slow access to moved files, where to store metadata, and more.
Chris Mellor, 11 Oct 2017
A Land Rover Discovery. Pic: Shutterstock

Q: How do you test future driverless car tech? A: Slurp a ton of real-world driving data

A group of council delivery drivers in East London are riding new £28,000 Land Rover Discovery Sport vehicles. A bit extravagant? Yes, deliberately so: these cars are testbeds for the Move UK autonomous car tech data-gathering project.
Gareth Corfield, 11 Oct 2017

Consistency is key to Oracle and Microsoft's hybrid cloud clout

Analysis Run the Azure Stack on-premises and you can move data and apps to the Azure public cloud with ease. It's the same software environment. Run the Oracle Cloud at Customer on-premises and move apps and data to the Oracle public cloud with ease. It's the same software and billing environment.
Chris Mellor, 11 Oct 2017

European Patent Office staff rep blames prez for 'slipping quality'

Fed up with years of willful ignorance, staff at the European Patent Office publicly called out their president in front of the organization's overseeing body.
Kieren McCarthy, 11 Oct 2017
Aircraft carrier take off photo via Shutterstock
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Has Nexenta's growth stalled?

Has software-defined storage supplier Nexenta's growth stalled? Far from it, its CEO and chairman insisted. It's booming and additional significant funding is coming, apparently.
Chris Mellor, 11 Oct 2017
A businessman in handcuffs

Ex-Autonomy CFO begs court to toss out US fraud allegations

The former chief financial officer of ill-fated $11bn HP acquisition Autonomy is asking a US court to dismiss felony fraud charges related to his role in the 2011 merger deal.
Shaun Nichols, 11 Oct 2017
2012 TC4 - NASA impression

NASA readies its asteroid warning system for harmless flyby

With asteroid 2012 TC4 about to pass between Earth and the moon, NASA is gearing up for its much-anticipated live test of its warning system.
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Qualcomm offers concessions to secure NXP Semi takeover

Qualcomm is hoping it can cut a deal with the European Union to get the go-ahead for its multi-billion NXP Semiconductors acquisition.
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'There has never been a right to absolute privacy' – US Deputy AG slams 'warrant-proof' crypto

Continuing the US government's menacing of strong end-to-end encryption, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein told an audience at the US Naval Academy that encryption isn't protected by the American Constitution.
Pop art style illustration of man exclaiming "WHAT?" in shock/horror/bemusement. Illustration via Shutterstock

'Israel hacked Kaspersky and caught Russian spies using AV tool to harvest NSA exploits'

Updated The brouhaha over Russian spies using Kaspersky antivirus to steal NSA exploits from a staffer's home PC took an explosive turn on Tuesday.
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Hackers nick $60m from Taiwanese bank in tailored SWIFT attack

Updated Hackers managed to pinch $60m from the Far Eastern International Bank in Taiwan by infiltrating its computers last week. Now, most of the money has been recovered, and two arrests have been made in connection with the cyber-heist.
Iain Thomson, 11 Oct 2017

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