Articles about transistors

Low-power transistors hint at alternative to battery bonfires

Since 1965, transistors have followed a path predicted by Gordon Moore, becoming more densely packed year after year. The result has been a steady improvement in CPU performance. Batteries, however, haven't advanced at the same pace. As Fred Schlachter, a physicist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, put it in a 2013 …
Thomas Claburn, 25 Oct 2016
graphene

Much more Moore's Law: Wonder-stuff graphene transistor trickery

Scientists have developed a way to “chemically grow” transistors that are only a few atoms thick in a bid to give poor old battered Moore's Law another reprieve, according to new research published in Nature Nanotechnology. Packing more transistors on a microchip becomes increasingly difficult as shortening the distance …
Katyanna Quach, 11 Jul 2016
Mega processor cables

Holy Crap! Bloke finishes hand-built CPU project!

Have you ever seen an up-close view of how a computer processor works? If you're in the UK, you can head over to Cambridge and see the process firsthand, thanks to the work of Reg friend James Newman, who has finally finished constructing his 16-bit masterpiece, the Mega Processor. You may remember the story of James and his …
Shaun Nichols, 24 Jun 2016

This whopping 16-bit computer processor is being built by hand, transistor by transistor

Pics A bloke in Cambridge, UK, is building a computer processor using 14,000 individual transistors and 3,500 LEDs – all by hand, piece by piece. James Newman said his Mega Processor relies almost entirely on the hand-soldered components, and will ultimately demonstrate how data travels through and is processed in a simple CPU core …
Shaun Nichols, 23 Jun 2015
Laser printed transistor

Boffins laser print flexible transistors

Printing transistors is nothing new – silicon fabrication is, after all, essentially a print process – but printing silicon ink onto flexible substrates is usually a problem because there's too much heat for the medium to handle. The difficult step is annealing, as that process turns a silicon ink into the polysilicon that …
Tim Anderson, 23 Apr 2015
Magneto

X-Men boffins demo nanomagnets to replace transistors

A team of scientists in Germany and the US have developed a new kind of logic gate that could crack the size problems haunting the processor industry. The problem is that the conventional CMOS method of producing chips requires ever-smaller transistors, but once you get to working in measurements of single-figure nanometers, …
Iain Thomson, 1 Oct 2014

Finally! Some actual, novel tech: Apple patent to revive geriatric gear

Apple has received a patent for a method of detecting if an electronic device's operating parameters are being adversely affected by aging circuitry, and if so changing those parameters remotely through adjustments to its firmware. US Patent 8,671,170, "Modifying operating parameters of a device based on aging information," …
Rik Myslewski, 11 Mar 2014

Three different roads to the 3-nanometer chip

Current technology should serve chip bakers well through the 14-nanometer process node, but if transistor scaling is to shrink further, a number of different possible avenues need to be explored. So concluded Adam Brand, senior director of Applied Materials' Transistor Technology Group, when giving a presentation at SEMICON …
Rik Myslewski, 25 Jul 2013
The Register breaking news

New transistor tech could beat silicon and save Moore's Law

IEDM Boffins at MIT's Microsystems Technology Laboratories have developed the world's smallest transistor made of indium gallium arsenide, a substance they say could replace silicon as the go-to material for building tomorrow's ultra-fast, ultra-small microchips. The tiny transistor is just 22nm in length, according to a report by …
Neil McAllister, 11 Dec 2012

IBM demos new nanotech

Somehow, we still manage to inch-out the limits of Moore’s Law: in a double-whammy to end the week, IBM has demonstrated the smallest carbon nanotube transistor, and has claimed the world’s fastest graphene transistor. The graphene transistor is something of a coup: its 100 GHz capability is the fastest frequency cutoff yet …

BREAKTHROUGH: Feisty startup slashes chip power by 50%

An impressively staffed startup by the name of SuVolta has teamed up with Japanese heavyweight Fujitsu Semiconductor to create a new chip-baking technique that promises low-power, inexpensive chips created in a highly scalable process and manufactured using equipment that's already ready in chip foundries. Yes, that …
Rik Myslewski, 7 Dec 2011

Intel finds cure for CPU old age

ISSCC Intel has developed a research microprocessor that it claims can improve throughput of degraded chips or chip environments by over 40 per cent. Such degradation might involve variations in supply voltage, temperature changes, or simply aging transistors. As described by Intel staff research scientist Keith Bowman on Tuesday at …
Rik Myslewski, 11 Feb 2010
IBM

IBM claims self-assembling chip leap

IBM's highly boffinated research division delivered today when the firm said it would be first to deploy self-assembly microchip nanotechnology on an industrial scale. The self-assembling material can be coaxed by a scaffold to form vacuum cavities, which improve electrical transmission by reducing transmission between …

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