Articles about surveillance

Not so private eye: Got an Axis network cam? You'll need to patch it, unless you like hackers

Researchers have detailed a string of vulnerabilities that, when exploited in combination, would allow for hundreds of models of internet-linked surveillance cameras to be remotely hijacked. Security biz VDOO said today it privately alerted cam-maker Axis Communications to the seven bugs it found in its gizmos, leading to the …
Shaun Nichols, 18 Jun 2018
Two people holding their fists up to the camera

RoboCop-ter: Boffins build drone to pinpoint brutal thugs in crowds

Video A drone surveillance system capable of highlighting “violent individuals” in a crowd in real time has been built by eggheads. The artificially intelligent technology uses a video camera on a hovering quadcopter to study the body movements of everyone in view. It then raises an alert when it identifies aggressive actions, such …
Many people, expressions of fear

'Tesco probably knows more about me than GCHQ': Infosec boffins on surveillance capitalism

Privacy of medical data and the machinations of surveillance capitalism were under the spotlight at a Cambridge University symposium last week. Much of the day-long event, marking the 20th anniversary of think tank the Foundation for Information Policy Research (FIPR), was spent debating state-backed surveillance in its many …
John Leyden, 4 Jun 2018
Lady  standing on a hand with a megaphone shouting into mans ear

UK's spy auditor: What should we ask when reviewing super-slurp warrants?

The body formed to audit Britain's spies has asked non-government bods what its team of judicial commissioners should consider when handing out warrants for bulk data-slurping. The Investigatory Powers Commissioner's Office (IPCO) – put together last year to consolidate the power of three separate commissioners – is tasked …
Rebecca Hill, 24 May 2018
Parade of dancers in costume at  London's Notting Hill carnival.

London's Met Police: We won't use facial recognition at Notting Hill Carnival

London cops will not use controversial and inaccurate facial recognition technology at this year's Notting Hill Carnival – in a departure from the trend over the previous two years. The Metropolitan Police have been using the technology since the 2016 carnival, which takes place on the August bank holiday weekend, despite …
Rebecca Hill, 24 May 2018
Supreme Court photo via Shutterstock

UK Supreme Court to probe British spy court's immunity from probing

Privacy International's years-long challenge against UK government hacking is headed to the nation's final court of appeal at the end of the year. The case, part of the privacy activists' ongoing legal battles over the UK's spy agencies' activities, focuses on the government's use of general warrants to hack computers and …
Rebecca Hill, 18 May 2018
police look over the evidence

Wah, encryption makes policing hard, cries UK's National Crime Agency

Encryption is making it more difficult for law enforcement agencies to detect dangerous offenders, according the the National Crime Agency's (NCA) yearly assessment of serious organised crime in Britain. "Since 2010, communication service providers have migrated to encrypted services 'by default', a process that accelerated …
Kat Hall, 14 May 2018

US prison telco accused of selling your phone's location to the cops

Updated An American telco that provides costly phone services to prisoners has been accused of harvesting location data on American phone users – and selling it to the police with no oversight. Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR) has asked America's comms watchdog – the Federal Communications Commission – and wireless carriers to investigate how …
Thomas Claburn, 11 May 2018
Surprised by smartphone

Make masses carry their mobes, suggests wig in not-at-all-creepy speech

A senior British judge has highlighted the benefits of legislation that obliges people to carry their mobile phone at all times. Sir Geoffrey Vos QC, Chancellor of the High Court and former head of the Bar Council, raised the prospect of compulsory mobe-carrying in a speech to the Law Society (PDF). Vos drew attention to the …
Andrew Orlowski, 11 May 2018

New law would stop Feds from demanding encryption backdoor

US lawmakers from both major political parties came together on Thursday to reintroduce a bill that, if passed, would prohibit the American government from forcing tech product makers to undermine the security of their wares. The bill, known as the Secure Data Act of 2018, was returned to the US House of Representatives by …
Thomas Claburn, 10 May 2018
Schoolkids in uniform studying with books/apple. Photo by shutterstock

Brit govt told to do its homework ahead of talks over post-Brexit spy laws and data flows

There is no doubt that the UK's surveillance regimes will come under scrutiny in negotiations on continued data flows with Europe after Brexit, and the government needs to start preparing for that now, MPs have been told. The British government has been repeatedly warned that gaining an adequacy decision from the EU will not …
Rebecca Hill, 10 May 2018

Kremlin's war on Telegram sees 50 VPNs stopped at the border

Russia's telecom regulator Roskomnadzor has taken a more granular approach to its battle with Telegram: instead of deep-sixing IP addresses by the millions, it says it's blocked 50 VPN providers from landing traffic in the country. At the end of last week, the regulator's deputy head Vadim Subbotin told state newsagency TASS …
NSA

NSA sought data on 534 MILLION phone calls in 2017

The United States’ Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) released its annual Intelligence Community Transparency Report last Friday, revealing the extent of America’s domestic intelligence-gathering efforts. Those efforts are certainly quite extensive. The report says America’s national security agencies …
Swarming bugs

Drone 'swarm' buzzed off FBI surveillance bods, says tech bloke

An American government employee has publicly claimed that a criminal gang used a swarm of drones to fend off an FBI raid. Joe Mazel, the chief of the American Federal Bureau of Investigation’s operational technology law unit, told the AUVSI Xponential conference in Colorado, USA, that a hostage rescue team were driven out of …

Australian Signals Directorate won't become domestic snoops

The Australian Federal Police (AFP) says it's investigating the leak of sensitive government documents outlining a plan the government says doesn't exist and won't be implemented. The Official Kerfuffle began when Australian Murdoch organ The Daily Telegraph published a story (unlinked because it's behind a paywall) alleging …
Ray Ozzie

Ozzie Ozzie Ozzie, oi oi oi! Tech zillionaire Ray's backdoor crypto for the Feds is Clipper chip v2

Analysis Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it, particularly if forgetfulness promises profit. Ray Ozzie, former CTO of Microsoft and the designer of Lotus Notes, is old enough to recall the battle over the Clipper chip, an ill-fated NSA-backed effort from 1993 through 1996 to require a US-government-accessible …
Thomas Claburn, 27 Apr 2018

State spy agencies 'outsource surveillance' to foreign partners – campaign group

There is a "dangerous lack of oversight" of global surveillance networks, Privacy International has said, warning that intelligence-sharing deals could become a way for states to "outsource surveillance". In a report, Secret Global Surveillance Networks: Intelligence Sharing Between Governments and the Need for Safeguards, …
Rebecca Hill, 24 Apr 2018
schoolchildren celebrate - throw papers in the air

UK.gov expected to quit controversial harvesting of schoolchildren's nationality data

Campaigners have welcomed reports that the UK government is planning to cease monitoring pupils' nationality in its mass school data slurp. The school census, a statutory survey that takes place three times a year, collects a range of information about students, including country of origin and nationality. Civil rights and …
Rebecca Hill, 10 Apr 2018

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