Articles about stanford university

Tasmanian fireball

RF pulses from dust collisions could be killing satellites

Space scientists have long known that impacts too small to pierce a craft's skin can still damage the electronics inside, by creating electromagnetic pulses. Why those pulses happen, however, is still not well understood. Alex Fletcher of Boston University and MIT, and Sigrid Close of Stanford University reckon they've cracked …
Java, photo via Shutterstock

Stanford Uni's intro to CompSci course adopts JavaScript, bins Java

In early April, Stanford University began piloting a new version of its introductory computer science course, CS 106A. The variant, CS 106J, is taught in JavaScript rather than Java. "[CS 106J] covers the same material as CS 106A but does so using JavaScript, the most common language for implementing interactive web pages, …
Thomas Claburn, 24 Apr 2017

Nanoparticle boffinry could boost battery life

The secrets to a longer battery life may lie in the shape of nanoparticles. That's according to a Stanford study published in Nature Materials today. Lithium-ion batteries can be made smaller using nanoparticles as their tiny size allows for faster charging and greater energy storage – which is useful for smartphones where …
Katyanna Quach, 28 Apr 2016
Aluminum battery

Aluminum bendy battery is boffins' answer to EXPLODING Li-ion menace

Vid Stanford University eggheads have revealed a prototype aluminum battery that's apparently rechargeable, flexible and cheap, and could replace lithium-ion and alkaline batteries. New aluminium-ion battery from Stanford "We have developed a rechargeable aluminum battery that may replace existing storage devices, such as …
Iain Thomson, 7 Apr 2015
flames_fire_destruction

PANTS on FIRE? Too late for you. But others will benefit from singed trouser phone alert

Boffins at Stanford University have invented a system which could banish the dreaded trouser fire to the annals of tech history. Regular readers of The Reg will know that the batteries used in mobile phones have a horrible tendency to blow up at inopportune moments. Whether it's an iPad Nano going kaboom in Japan, a Swiss …
Jasper Hamill, 14 Oct 2014
Google UK office logos

Stanford Uni: Google cash leaves us entirely impartial and unbiased

A court document drafted by a recipient of Google's generosity appears to show that the latter comes with strings attached, prohibiting university researchers from investigating its controversial data slurping practices. The donation went to the Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society, which drafted the filing. The part …
Andrew Orlowski, 26 Sep 2014

OHM MY GOD! Move over graphene, here comes '100% PERFECT' stanene

A US, Chinese, and German research team has come up with a new material dubbed "stanene" that could – theoretically, at least – conduct electricity with "100 percent efficiency" at temperatures at which computer chips operate, raising the tantalizing possibility of highly efficient future chippery. "Stanene could increase the …
Rik Myslewski, 4 Dec 2013
STEREO image of the Sun. Pic: NASA

Flippin' heck! Magnetic poles of Sun are gyrating: What Earth needs to know

Vid Sun watchers at Stanford say our star is undergoing one of its periodic magnetic polarity changes, leading to a modest peak in solar activity. "It looks like it's happening right now in the southern hemisphere," Todd Hoeksema, a solar physicist at the university, told The Register. "The North Pole flipped in early June last …
Iain Thomson, 11 Nov 2013
Stanford University's Luminos solar car

2013 World Solar Challenge racers start the big reveal

SPB In 2011, The Reg's Special Projects Bureau followed the World Solar Challenge through the dead heart of Australia. This year, we'll do it again. 2013's World Solar Challenge hits the road on October 6th and The Register's Vulture South team will hit the road too, tracking the racers from the top end through the never-never and …
The Register breaking news

Bio-boffins create world's first digital STD

A bacterium that in humans can cause genital pain, itching, and a burning sensation while urinating has become the subject of the first-ever complete software simulation of an entire organism, the New York Times reports. The simulation is the work of a team of boffins from Stanford University and the J. Craig Venter Institute …
Neil McAllister, 20 Jul 2012
The Register breaking news

Stanford boosts century-old battery tech

A group of Stanford University scientists is claiming a breakthrough using graphene that would bring nickel-iron batteries into the modern world. Originally an invention of Thomas Edison, nickel-iron batteries are durable but slow, both for charging and discharging. Although they only lasted in their original application – …
The Register breaking news

Stanford boffins create skinnier ‘skin’

A group of scientists from Stanford University has created an artificial “skin” that acts as a stretchable, super-thin pressure sensor. The Bao Research Group led by Zhenan Bao has demonstrated the film, which is made from single-wall carbon nanotubes bent to act as springs. The real breakthrough, however, isn’t just creating …

Chip makers to strut their stuff at Hot Chips 23

The Hot Chips 23 symposium on high-performance chips kicks off at Stanford University next week. The makers of processors for smartphones, desktops, servers, and networking gear are polishing up their powerpoints to amaze and daze each other from August 17 through 19. On the traditional server front, Intel is on deck to talk …
The Register breaking news

US judge decrees open source licenses valid

Openistas are celebrating a major court victory over a legal spat involving model railroad hobbyists that will have big implications for the Creative Commons license. The US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington ruled that just because a software programmer freely gave his work away, it didn’t follow that it …
Kelly Fiveash, 14 Aug 2008
The Register breaking news

Lessig leads Net Neut charge in Stanford inquisition

Left Coast Comcast Hearing "The most outrageous thing about this whole story," Larry Lessig told FCC boss Kevin Martin, "is that we can't get the facts straight." And we agree with him. When the US Federal Communications Commission parachuted into Silicon Valley last week, pulling together another public hearing on the network management practices of …
Cade Metz, 21 Apr 2008
channel

PePWave links LANs to city Wi-Fi

Hong Kong-based Wi-Fi developer PePWave claims that its two new pieces of hardware will enable service providers to cover areas they couldn't cover before because of access control and cost issues. The first is Mesh Connector - a Wi-Fi repeater system which extends the coverage of a public mesh but is cheaper than doing it …
Bryan Betts, 15 May 2007
Sony PlayStation 3

Folding@home comes to the PS3

Sony is to let Playstation 3 users run Folding@home on their consoles, helping the study of Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, cystic fibrosis and many cancers. Folding@home is a popular distributed computing app from Stanford University. It uses the downtime of many thousands of internet-connected PCs volunteered for the project by …
Drew Cullen, 15 Mar 2007

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