Articles about scientists

Trump

Doomsday Clock moves to 150 seconds before midnight. Thanks, Trump

The Doomsday Clock, maintained for the past 70 years by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, has been moved to two and a half minutes from midnight following the election of Donald Trump. The clock was originally set at seven minutes to midnight in 1947, but this was cut to two minutes in 1953 after the US and USSR tested …
Iain Thomson, 26 Jan 2017
Students using MacBooks in a lecture hall

Scientists love MacBooks (true) – but what about you?

Sysadmin Blog I've done a few Apple in the enterprise articles recently, and it has set me thinking. Despite Apple's obvious success in a number of areas, a fair amount of nerdly vitriol is spewed at Macs. I have had a few unkind words to say about them*, but the arguments can get quite heated. Some of the particular debate points used by …
Trevor Pott, 10 Jun 2015

So, what exactly defines a 'boffin'? Speak your brains...

The recent protest by computer scientist Yossi Oren of Columbia University that he hadn't been hailed as a boffin here at El Reg prompted some lively debate at Vulture Central as what exactly defines the term. Some of us, while conceding that scientists such as Oren are indeed clever chaps, felt that his area of expertise …
Lester Haines, 12 Jun 2014
The Register breaking news

Boffins, tourists threaten Antarctica with alien invasion

Ice-loving boffins and tourists are wrecking the Antarctic by effectively busing in lifeforms alien to the cold continent, according to a new study. Scientists who journey to the ice-bound land for research purposes, and the growing number of sightseers heading for the South Pole, are carrying with them seeds of foreign plants …
The Register breaking news

Laptop batteries made of jelly invented

Jelly could be the answer to the problem of cheaper batteries for electronics, according to some boffins over at Leeds University. They've come up with a type of polymer gel that could replace the liquid electrolytes used in rechargeable lithium cells. And of course, because it's jelly-like, it can be moulded into all shapes …
The Register breaking news

Welsh scientists 'barcode' native flora

Welsh scientists are working towards a complete DNA "barcode" record of the country's 1,143 flowering plants. The Barcode Wales initiative forms part of the Barcode of Life plan to establish a database of standardised IDs for all the world's species, comprising a "very short genetic sequence from a standard part of the genome …
Lester Haines, 7 Apr 2011
The Register breaking news

Indian courts 'rule astrology is a science'

Oh those crazy Indians! A high court judge in the subcontinent has apparently ruled that astrology is a pukka science like physics or chemistry. Or maybe not. The Telegraph reports that the Bombay High Court (it is officially still called that, before everyone gets on our case about "Mumbai") has decided that proper scientists …
Team Register, 7 Feb 2011
The Register breaking news

Cheerleaders in danger from cheerleading

In a startling set of new findings, researchers have concluded that cheerleaders who perform stunts are at greater risk of injury from cheerleading stunts. Using an "Internet-based reporting system for cheerleading-related injuries" (Cheerleading RIO™), boffins from Columbus Ohio gathered data from battle-torn American …
Pratik Desai, 16 Nov 2009
The Register breaking news

Quickening satellite quickens pulses at ESA

Baffled Boffins at the European Space Agency (ESA) are hoping that today's Earth fly-by of the Rosetta satellite will shed light on a problem of significant gravity. At 07:45GMT this morning, the ESA's Rosetta started its third fly-past of the Earth, looking for a gravitational sling-shot. This particular event is being …
Pratik Desai, 13 Nov 2009
The Register breaking news

Marie Curie voted top female boffin

Marie Curie has topped a poll to name the most notable female scientist of all time, beating Brit biophysicist Rosalind Franklin into second spot. Polish-born Curie, later a French citizen, is celebrated for her part in the discovery of polonium and radium, as well as pioneering work in the treatment of cancers using …
Lester Haines, 2 Jul 2009
The Register breaking news

Scientists decry Bletchley Park's decline

A group of the UK's leading computer scientists has demanded government action to save Bletchley Park from further decay, saying that “the ravages of age and a lack of investment” threaten the future of Station X. Some of the wooden codebreaking huts are in "a desperate state of decay" and, as we recently reported, the …
Lester Haines, 24 Jul 2008
The Register breaking news

Family converts dead dad into diamond

A Blackpool family has created a "fitting memorial" to deceased dad Mick Egan - by converting him into a synthetic diamond, the BBC reports. Egan died last year of a brain haemorrhage and his wife Susan decided on a novel way of preserving his memory. A US company extracted carbon from Egan's ashes, heated it to create graphite …
Lester Haines, 29 Mar 2007
The Register breaking news

Researchers link human skull size and climate

Humans grew bigger brains as the climate they lived in got cooler, according to researchers at the University at Albany, New York. The researchers concluded that humans got brainier because they had to adapt to a more challenging environment. They base this assertion on a plot of cranial capacity of 109 fossilised human skulls …
Lucy Sherriff, 26 Mar 2007
The Register breaking news

UN urged to adopt asteroid impact treaty

AAAS Moves are afoot in the astronaut community to hustle the UN into adopting a treaty which would set a deflection mission in motion if Earth was threatened by a large asteroid impact. A series of four meetings organised by the Association of Space Explorers (ASE) will seek to draw up a protocol which the UN can act upon when …
The Register breaking news

Bionic-boosted eyes go hi-def

AAAS A new version of an electronic implant which restores visual capabilities in blind people holds untold promise, those gathered at a meeting in San Francisco heard today, as the technology behind the device is taken to the next level. Back in 2005, the news that a man who had been blind for 50 years had regained some sight with …

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