Articles about ripa

Pierce Brosnan in Tomorrow Never Dies

'GCHQ's surveillance data gulp is BULKY and WARRANTLESS', human rights groups moan

Britain's spooks routinely rummage through reams of intelligence data from the NSA and other foreign spy agencies without first having to request a warrant, it has been claimed. According to the human rights groups that brought the UK's snooping agency GCHQ to court in July this year, secret internal policies unveiled during a …
Kelly Fiveash, 29 Oct 2014

Want a customer's call records Mr Plod? No probs

Three of the UK’s four largest mobe networks run automated systems that make customers’ call records readily available to the cops without the need for any human intervention. EE, Vodafone and Three pass on customer data ‘like a cash machine”, an employee at one phone company told The Guardian. All operators must store …
Paul Kunert, 12 Oct 2014

'Cops and public bodies BUNGLE snooping powers by spying on 3,000 law-abiding Brits'

Thousands of innocent Brits have reportedly been mistakenly snooped on by UK police and public bodies. That claim, which involved nearly 3,000 citizens, was made in a Times report (£) on Saturday. It was alleged that "Authorities routinely use sweeping legal powers to collect phone and internet records secretly". And there …
Kelly Fiveash, 5 Oct 2014
Police outside 10 Downing Street. Credit: zongo

Warrantless phone snooping HAPPENS ALL THE TIME in Blighty

It's perfectly legal for the police to slurp up the phone records of any entity they take a dislike to, without any external oversight whatsoever, for the purpose of punishing whistleblowers. If you didn't realise this was possible, you've not been paying attention for the last decade. Earlier this week the Metropolitan Police …

UK gov rushes through emergency law on data retention

Emergency law is expected within days to be pushed through Parliament that will force ISPs to retain customer data to allow spooks to continue to spy on Brits' internet and telephone activity, after existing powers were recently ruled invalid by the European Union's highest court. The planned legislation crucially has cross- …
Kelly Fiveash, 10 Jul 2014
Prison window

Computing student jailed after failing to hand over crypto keys

+Comment A computer science student accused of hacking offences has been jailed for six months for failing to hand over his encryption passwords, which he had been urged to do in "the interests of national security". Christopher Wilson, 22, of Mitford Close, Washington, Tyne and Wear, was jailed for refusing to hand over his computer …
John Leyden, 8 Jul 2014
Yahoo! buss

UK.gov! frets! over! Yahoo! exodus! to! RIPA-free! Dublin!

Yahoo! was reportedly called into the Home Office on Thursday where Teresa May expressed UK government security concerns about its plans to move its main base in Europe to Ireland. The internet giant has harboured privacy concerns for some time, according to The Guardian. These concerns can only have been exacerbated by recent …
John Leyden, 21 Mar 2014
padlock

Clink! Terrorist jailed for refusing to tell police his encryption password

A convicted terrorist will serve additional time in jail after he was found guilty of refusing to supply police with the password for a memory stick that they could not crack. Syed Farhan Hussain, 22, from Luton, was handed a four-month sentence at the Old Bailey on Tuesday after a jury took just 19 minutes to deliver the …
John Leyden, 16 Jan 2014
GCHQ Benhall doughnut aerial view

GCHQ was called in to crack password in Watkins child abuse case

It was operatives at British intelligence agency GCHQ who cracked the password on the laptop of "determined paedophile" Ian Watkins, a court heard on Tuesday. The evidence heard in court related to child abuse images held in cloud storage, whose password the GCHQ unit had to "crack" to gain access to them. Ian Watkins, 36, …
John Leyden, 27 Nov 2013
The Register breaking news

Parliament: Snoop Charter plan 'too sweeping', 'misleading', 'suspicious'

Theresa May's communications data draft bill is far too broad and needs to be slimmed down, concluded MPs and peers who have spent many months scrutinising the Home Secretary's lambasted plans to massively increase the surveillance of online activity in the UK. The joint committee, chaired by Lord Blencathra, said: Our …
Kelly Fiveash, 11 Dec 2012
The Register breaking news

Phone-hack saga: Prosecutors mull charges for 11 suspects

Four journalists and one cop have been pinpointed by the UK's Crown Prosecution Service over alleged offences relating to phone hacking, it emerged today. The CPS confirmed to The Register that 11 suspects could face prosecution over misdeeds that led to the scandal that rocked Rupert Murdoch's media empire and damaged the …
Kelly Fiveash, 18 Apr 2012
The Register breaking news

Child abuse suspect won't be forced to decrypt hard drive

A federal appeals court has ruled it improper to compel a child pornography suspect to decrypt his hard drive because such an act would violate his Fifth Amendment rights. The ruling (PDF) by the Atlanta-based US 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in the case of an unnamed suspect from Florida (known in court papers as "John Doe") …
John Leyden, 27 Feb 2012
The Register breaking news

BlackBerry Messenger archives open for inspection

Messages passing through the BlackBerry Messenger system are almost certainly already under examination by the police, who need neither warrants nor ministerial permission to search them for evidence. While the Regulatory Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA) is necessary for interception of live communications. once the messages …
Bill Ray, 9 Aug 2011
arrow pointing up

ISP-operated servers alter search results, researchers claim

Search engine requests are being altered to redirect users to specific websites in a "stealthy" system that benefits advertisers, US researchers have claimed. "Malicious servers" operated by internet service providers (ISPs) redirect users to websites relating to the information they have searched for using search engines …
OUT-LAW.COM, 9 Aug 2011
The Register breaking news

US court test for rights not to hand over crypto keys

Civil liberties activists have lent their support to a case that will test whether a US citizen can refuse to decrypt personal data on the grounds that it might be self-incriminatory. The case involves allegedly fraudulent real estate transactions. The government wants a Colorado court to compel Ramona Fricosu, who is accused …
John Leyden, 13 Jul 2011
The Register breaking news

Phone, slab location data 'is personal' - EU watchdogs

Data identifying mobile phone users' locations should count as personal data and receive a high level of protection, the EU's data protection watchdogs will tell the European Commission, according to a newspaper report. If the Commission adopts the recommendation, provision for the protection of location-revealing data could …
OUT-LAW.COM, 17 May 2011
The Register breaking news

RIPA to be changed to demand full consent to monitoring

It will no longer be enough to have "reasonable grounds" to believe that someone had consented to monitoring of their communications under changes to the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA) proposed by the Government. Putting notice of monitoring in terms and conditions will not be enough to count as consent to that …
OUT-LAW.COM, 20 Apr 2011
The Register breaking news

NoTW offers apologies, 'regret' over phone hacks

Rupert Murdoch's UK tentacle News International, owner of the Sun, the Times and the News of the World titles, has expressed "genuine regret" regarding surveillance operations – specifically, voicemail interception – by staff at the NoTW. In a statement supplied to the Reg, the company says: News International has decided to …
Lewis Page, 8 Apr 2011

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