Articles about privacy

privacy

WhatsApp? You still don't get EU privacy laws, that's WhatsApp

WhatsApp's privacy policies have come under fresh scrutiny from the European Union's data protection regulators, who say the Facebook-owned business has failed to smarten up its act. The Article 29 Working Party, which comprises data regulators from EU nations and the EU itself, believes that WhatsApp's latest terms and …
Rebecca Hill, 26 Oct 2017

FYI: iOS apps can turn on your camera any time without warning

A top iOS security researcher has uncovered yet another privacy loophole in Apple's mobile firmware. Felix Krause, founder of Fastlane.Tools, said the way Apple's software handles camera access and recording is leaving many fans vulnerable to being spied on by apps on their gadgets without any notification or warning. Krause …
Shaun Nichols, 25 Oct 2017
Tax haven

Panic of Panama Papers-style revelations follows Bermuda law firm hack

A major offshore law firm admitted it had been hacked on Tuesday, prompting fears of a Panama Papers-style exposé into the tax affairs of the super rich. Jersey-based Appleby only admitted it had suffered the breach – which actually happened last year – after a group of journos from the International Consortium of …
John Leyden, 25 Oct 2017
Man looks put off by something he's seen on a tablet

International data watchdogs: Websites don't tell you who sees your privates

The privacy notices used by websites and apps to tell users what data they collect and how it will be used fail to offer the necessary specifics, an international study has found. The work, carried out by 24 data protection regulators across the world, assessed the notices, communications and sign-up processes used by 455 …
Rebecca Hill, 25 Oct 2017

Sarahah anonymous feedback app told: 'You're riddled with web app flaws'

The web-based version of anonymous feedback app Sarahah is riddled with security flaws, according to a researcher. Sarahah is a well established mobile app that allows people to receive anonymous feedback messages from friends and co-workers. Flaws in the technology make it vulnerable to web-based attacks including cross-site …
John Leyden, 23 Oct 2017
EU parliament photo2 via Shutterstock

MEPs vote to update 'cookie law' despite ad industry pressure

European legislation that aims to put over-the-top services on a level pegging with their more traditional telecoms counterparts, and gives users more rights over websites tracking them, has been approved by a committee of MEPs. The proposed ePrivacy rules, which will update a directive that was last amended in 2009, have been …
Rebecca Hill, 20 Oct 2017
Stack of cash

Google faces $10k-a-day fines if it defies court order to hand over folks' private overseas email

Google and the American government are quarreling over just how much money the Chocolate Factory must pay in daily fines if it loses its war against a search warrant for email held overseas. The Mountain View giant is refusing to comply with the warrant, issued in the US, requiring it to cough up Gmail messages held on a …
Shaun Nichols, 19 Oct 2017
sad kids

Hackers can track, spoof locations and listen in on kids' smartwatches

Tests on smartwatches for children by security firm Mnemonic and the Norwegian Consumer Council have revealed them to be riddled with flaws. The Oslo-based company teamed up with the trading standards body to investigate several smartwatches aimed at kids, specifically the Xplora (and associated mobile application Xplora T1), …
John Leyden, 18 Oct 2017
Hipster pizza guy photo via Shutterstock

Domino's Pizza delivers user details to spammers

Domino's Pizza's Australian outpost has blamed a partner for a security breach, after angry customers went online complaining about finding themselves on spam lists. The company owned up to the breach after Redditor “Pinchie McPinch” complained about receiving e-mails from “Sarah” and “Jess”. What tipped Pinchie that the data …

NHS: Remember those patient records we didn't deliver? Well, we found another 162,000

NHS leaders have admitted that the biggest ever loss of patient documents is worse than initially thought, as another 162,000 undelivered documents have been discovered. The scandal was first revealed back in February, when the UK's national health service was forced to admit that 709,000 items of correspondence – which …
Rebecca Hill, 17 Oct 2017

Dying! Yahoo! loses! fight! to! lock! dead! man's! dead! account!

Yahoo! may be compelled to hand over the contents of a dead man's email account to his surviving family, Massachusetts's top court has ruled. On Monday, the US state's supreme struck down an earlier ruling in the Purple Palace's favor in a case regarding the estate of John Ajemian, who was killed at the age of 43 in a bike …
Shaun Nichols, 16 Oct 2017

Supreme Court to rule on whether US has right to data stored overseas

The US Supreme Court has agreed to hear a dispute over whether Microsoft should release personal emails stored in Ireland to America's federal government. In 2014, the US Department of Justice took Microsoft to court because the software giant refused to give up emails stored on its data centres in Ireland, which would …
Andrew Silver, 16 Oct 2017
Massive human has key to little person's house.

Huge power imbalance between firms and users whose info they grab

Mass commercial data gathering and opaque decision-making processes have a “massive potential” to damage personal autonomy and dignity, a report has said. Data gathered and stored by companies is increasingly being used to make decisions that can affect people’s lives, but the systems that drive these processes are often …
Rebecca Hill, 16 Oct 2017

Remember how you said it was cool if your mobe network sold your name, number and location?

US mobile phone companies appear to be selling their customers' private data – including their full name, phone number, contract details, home zip code and current location to third parties – all in the name of security. Security researcher Philip Neustrom found and linked to demo sites run by two mobile authentication …
Kieren McCarthy, 16 Oct 2017
holland

Microsoft faces Dutch crunch over Windows 10 private data slurp

Yet another European nation is turning up the heat on Microsoft for extracting heaps and heaps of telemetry and other intelligence from Windows 10 PCs. This time, it's privacy authorities in the Netherlands who are calling out Redmond for its hog-wild harvesting of data from machines that run Windows 10 Home and Pro. The Dutch …
Shaun Nichols, 14 Oct 2017
Privacy

Dear America, you can't steal a personality: GDPR godfather talks privacy with El Reg

Interview "Now I've heard that one before. Let me think, where was it... Ah yes. It was Google!" Jan Philipp Albrecht is the biggest thorn in the side of US data slurpers, and fortunately he has a good memory. The German Green MEP is the architect of Europe's new privacy regulations, GDPR, and we were discussing a rhetorical question …
Andrew Orlowski, 13 Oct 2017
Big bill

Beware the GDPR 'no win, no fee ambulance chasers' – experts

The UK's incoming data protection laws could bring with them a wave of "no win, no fee"-style companies, experts have said. Much of the discussion about the impact of the EU General Data Protection Regulation – which comes into force in May 2018 – has focused on the fines regulators can impose. Although these are large – up …
Rebecca Hill, 13 Oct 2017

OnePlus privacy shock: So, the cool Chinese smartphones slurp an alarming amount of data

OnePlus mobiles are phoning home rather detailed information about handsets without any obvious permission or warnings, setting off another debate about what information our smartphones are emitting. Software engineer Christopher Moore discovered that the information collected included the phone's International Mobile …
John Leyden, 12 Oct 2017

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