Articles about paleontology

Dreadnoughtus schrani

DREADNOUGHTUS: The 65-TON DINO that could crumple up a T-Rex like a paper cup

Paleontologists report that they have discovered the remains of a new type of dinosaur - dubbed Dreadnoughtus schrani - that tipped the scales at 65 tons, was 85 feet long ... and was still growing fast when it died. Dreadnoughtus schrani Dreadnoughtus schrani - our weightiest dinosaur to date Kenneth Lacovara, associate …
Iain Thomson, 4 Sep 2014
Hallucigenia animation

Boffins ID freakish spine-smothered prehistoric critter: The CLAW gave it away

The surrealist nightmare worm Hallucigenia, so-called because of its otherworldly appearance and apparent lack of place on the taxonomic ranks, has finally found its place in evolutionary history... and even appears to have some modern-day descendants. Hallucigenia animation Hallucigenia is one of the most bizarre-looking …
The Register breaking news

Fred Flintstone may not have been real but his pet Dino WAS - boffins

Scientists believe they have found the world's oldest dinosaur after fully analysing a fossil unearthed 80 years ago. The ten-foot-long dorky-looking Nyasasaurus parringtoni scuttled over the Earth 10 to 15 million years earlier than the previously oldest known dinosaurs, palaeontologists claimed in an article published in the …
Anna Leach, 5 Dec 2012
The Register breaking news

Fossil reveals spider in mid-strike

A hundred million years ago, an amber flow spoiled a spider’s day: it had waited, possibly for hours, to ambush a wasp in its web, and just as it decided to strike, spider, wasp and web were all trapped forever. The good news for us is that it’s turned up at a dig in Myanmar's Hukawng Valley, and here's what it looks like: …
The Register breaking news

Prehistoric-super-tooth dentists drill DIAMONDS into duck-billed 'saur riddle

Some dentistry work on a 70-million-year-old tooth has provided an insight into the evolutionary success of duck-billed dinosaurs. Hadrosaurs' unique tooth structure is now a vital clue in the mystery of how the billed herbivores, dubbed "the cows of the Cretaceous era", spread so far and lived for so long. The ancient …
Anna Leach, 5 Oct 2012
The Register breaking news

Oldest skeleton found in South Australia

Researchers from the University of California Riverside and the South Australian Museum have turned up a surprising creature more than half a billion years old, showing signs of a skeleton. The find, called Coronacollina acula, is the oldest fossil so far discovered to show signs of ‘hard structure’ development, the …
The Register breaking news

‘Oldest animals’ show up in Namibian dig

For now, anyhow, the starting date for highly-organised life has gained a new record, with a dig in Namibia yielding up sponge fossils dated somewhere between 100 and 150 million years earlier than anything else yet found. While the tiny sponges, turned up by British and African researchers in sites including Namibia’s Etosha …
The Register breaking news

Eyes on stalks: ancient predator a real monster

A group of scientists working on fossils from Kangaroo Island in South Australia has turned up a Cambrian predator with horror-movie specs: razor serrations in a circular mouth, claws at the front of its head, and compound eyes on stalks. Taagged Anomalocaris (roughly “irregular shrimp”, or perhaps “abnormal shrimp”), the …
The Register breaking news

Sulphur-loving microbes might be oldest life

A microbial bacterial fossil find is being hailed as proof that life existed in the oxygen-free environment of Earth, 3.4 billion years ago. The Strelley Pool Formation in Western Australia was once a beach, but is now more than 100 Km inland near(ish) the town of Marble Bar, and is popular among paleontologists because of the …
The Register breaking news

Scientists tremble before 'thunder-thighs' sauropod

Scientists have identified a new species of Early Cretaceous sauropod - a six-tonne beast with a fearsome set of rear legs which have prompted paleontologists to dub it "thunder-thighs". A team including Dr Mike Taylor of University College London unearthed the remains of an adult and juvenile in Hotel Mesa Quarry in Grand …
Lester Haines, 23 Feb 2011
The Register breaking news

Paleontologists: Standardise 3D laser image files, for pity's sake

Bone-fancying boffins in the States have issued an impassioned call for the world of paleontology to standardise on a digital file format for 3D images of fossils before it's too late. Ellis W. Shuler's photo of Glen Rose track Until recently, fossils were recorded by investigating boffins using moulds or casts of plaster …
Lewis Page, 14 Feb 2011
The Register breaking news

MEGA DINO-WHALE from 'Valley of the Whales' exhibited

Bone-griffling boffins in the States are chuffed to announce their new and magnificent, fully assembled 50-foot-long prehistoric carnivorous dinomegawhale fossil. The mighty Basilosaurus isis was discovered along with more than a thousand other aeons-dead whale skeletons in an area of Egyptian desert known as the "Valley of the …
Lewis Page, 20 Dec 2010
The Register breaking news

Horny new 'ballerina' Tyrannosaur was light on its feet

Archaeologists say they have discovered a new kind of tyrannosaurus, very different to the big bruiser tyrannosaurs already well known. The new dino was slim, light on its feet, horny and partial to meat, according to the boffins. A altai, the new horny lightweight tyrannosaur. Credit: Jason Brougham Scientist's impression …
Lewis Page, 6 Oct 2009
The Register breaking news

Australia's 'answer to the velociraptor' unveiled

Australian media report that three "new dinosaurs" have been discovered at a "prehistoric billabong dating back 95 million years". Aussie paleontologists have stated uncompromisingly that their down-under dinos would easily win in a fight with soft poofter aeons-dead antediluvian lizards from other, less fortunate nations. In …
Lewis Page, 3 Jul 2009
The Register breaking news

Dinosaurs actually slimmer than we thought, say boffins

American researchers say they have uncovered a mathematical mistake made by the dinosaur boffinry community, meaning that the weight of live dinos has long been massively overestimated. In a development with devastating consequences for various much-fancied works of fiction, it now appears that in fact the dinosaurs were …
Lewis Page, 22 Jun 2009
The Register breaking news

Thermageddon, the BBC and a giant snake

Listeners to BBC World Service's Science in Action program got a nasty surprise last week. In the midst of a discussion about the large snake fossil, a scientist dropped this bombshell: "The Planet has heated and cooled repeatedly throughout its history. What we're doing is the rate at which we're heating the planet is many …
Andrew Orlowski, 15 Feb 2009
The Register breaking news

Dead dinos no help to emerging mammals

The triumphant rise of the mammals had nothing to do with the extinction of the dinosaurs, according to new research, published in the journal Nature. The paper's co-author, Kate Jones, told BBC Radio 4: "The meteor impact that killed off the dinosaurs has traditionally been thought to have given mammals the edge they needed …
Lucy Sherriff, 30 Mar 2007

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