Articles about moore's law

Suitcase full of money

DARPA lays out cash-splash to defibrillate Moore's Law

The United States' Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) wants to find the electronics industry's next iteration of Moore's Law and has loaded up a US$75 million defibrillator to jolt industry into making it happen. The moolah comes by way of an expansion of the blue-sky agency's Electronics Resurgence Initiative ( …
1nm_transistor

Boffins eschew silicon to build tiniest-ever transistor, just 1nm long

Boffins from the United States Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and beyond say they've cracked a new way to make very, very, small transistors. As explained in their Science paper MoS2 transistors with 1-nanometer gate lengths, the authors explain silicon is a lovely substance with …
Simon Sharwood, 10 Oct 2016

Zombie Moore's Law shows hardware is eating software

After being pronounced dead this past February - in Nature, no less - Moore’s Law seems to be having a very weird afterlife. Within the space of the last thirty days we've seen: Intel announce some next-generation CPUs that aren’t very much faster than the last generation of CPUs; Intel delay, again, the release of some of …
Mark Pesce, 22 Sep 2016

By 2040, computers will need more electricity than the world can generate

Without much fanfare, the Semiconductor Industry Association earlier this month published a somewhat-bleak assessment of the future of Moore's Law – and at the same time, called “last drinks” on its decades-old International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS). The industry's been putting together the roadmap every …
NRL's STM image of molecular transistor

Much more Moore's Law, as boffins assemble atom-level transistor

The end times for Moore's Law aren't quite at hand, but we now know what the silicon-killer might look like: single-molecule transistors that can switch at the single electron level. That's what a multinational team of boffins working with the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) say they've created. The transistor consists of …
Easter_Island_Monoliths

Don't start reading the last rites for monolithic storage just yet

Monolithic storage arrays may well claim that rumours of their death have been exaggerated, but that doesn't mean that they aren't entering the digital care-home for the soon-to-be-departed. These boxes — the mainframes of storage — are magnificent beasts, like do-everything battleships of the storage wars in an era in which …
Chris Mellor, 1 Jul 2015

The huge flaw in Moore’s Law? It's NOT a law after all

Critics have had half a century to pick apart and predict the end of Moore’s Law, which marked its Big Five Zero birthday this week. It’s unlikely that Gordon Earle Moore, the former electrical engineer who authored the eponymous law for a 1965 article, and who two-years later co-founded Intel, has any doubts over its value. …
Dave Wilby, 23 Apr 2015
IBM_Spintronics

Graphene spintronics crowned latest Moore's Law extender contender

Wonder material graphene could provide the basis for the future of circuitry, by using a technique known as spintronics, boffins have mused. Spintronics uses the spin of individual electrons as the encoding method for data. This is significantly smaller than using charge, which requires thousands of electrons. Unfortunately, …
Simon Rockman, 16 Apr 2015
Silicene's structure

Silicene takes on graphene as next transistor wonder-stuff

University of Texas boffins have offered up another material they reckon is a hot bet for future generations of Moore's-law-beating super-fast transistors: silicene. Throwing its hat into the ring as an alternate to the popular wonder-stuff graphene, silicene – a single-atom-thick layer of silicon atoms – is, like graphene, …

Technology quiz reveals that nobody including quiz drafters knows anything about IT

A terrifying new quiz has indicated that the state of knowledge among Americans regarding IT topics is abysmally low: but the questions are such as to indicate that even the drafters of the quiz didn't know much. The quiz in question is one from Pew Research, intended to find out "What Internet Users Know about Technology and …
Lewis Page, 26 Nov 2014
Magneto

X-Men boffins demo nanomagnets to replace transistors

A team of scientists in Germany and the US have developed a new kind of logic gate that could crack the size problems haunting the processor industry. The problem is that the conventional CMOS method of producing chips requires ever-smaller transistors, but once you get to working in measurements of single-figure nanometers, …
Iain Thomson, 1 Oct 2014

Govt control? Hah! It's IMPOSSIBLE to have a successful command economy

Worstall on Wednesday One of the perennials of the great economic debate is those who insist that if we centrally planned how the economy would run, it would all work much better than this messy competition, profit-and-loss and duplication-of-effort system we're stuck with at the moment. And it didn't all start with the Soviets. Back in late- …
Tim Worstall, 13 Aug 2014

Microsoft 'Catapults' geriatric Moore's Law from CERTAIN DEATH

Microsoft has found a way to massively increase the compute capabilities of its data centers, despite the fact that Moore's Law is wheezing towards its inevitable demise. In a paper to be presented this week at the International Symposium on Computer Architecture (ISCA), titled A Reconfigurable Fabric for Accelerating Large- …
Jack Clark, 16 Jun 2014
Copper, before and after graphene

Tiny heat-sucker helps keep Moore's Law going

Adding graphene to copper can improve its heat-conducting properties – and that's good news for electronics developers. One of the barriers to the continuing shrinking of electronics is that as you pack more features into a smaller space, you also pack more heat into that space. That makes heat a hurdle standing in the way of …
ANU Laser light

Nanowire laser is a GaAs, GaAs, GaAs (with a bit of arsenic)

A group of researchers at the Australian National University (ANU) is showing off nanowire-based lasers, as part of the microelectronics world's ongoing search for the best way to integrate electronics and photonics. The research, described in a Nature Photonics paper (abstract) led by Professor Chennupati Jagadish, …
Windows 9x BSOD

MIT boffins: Use software to fix errors made by decaying silicon

Smaller transistors means more noise means more errors means the collapse of everything we know and love about computers, such as their infallible ability to run with perfect stability for years on end … right? Well, perhaps not such perfection, but the basic problem remains: ever-shrinking microprocessor feature sizes will …

Boffins create bulk-process on-silicon optics

A group of researchers from MIT and the University of Boulder at Colorado say they've moved photonics a step closer to integration with both microprocessors and memory. On-chip photonics offer a number of attractive prospects for chip-makers. Photonic communications generate less heat than electrons moving through copper, and …

Intel reveals 14nm PC, declares Moore's Law 'alive and well'

IDF13 Intel wants you to know that Moore's Law is not dead. And to prove it, CEO Brian Krzanich rolled out his company's next generation of process shrinkage at the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco. "I'm here to introduce the first 14-nanometer PC," Krzanich said during his Tuesday keynote. The Ultrabook he displayed to his …
Rik Myslewski, 10 Sep 2013

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