Articles about medicine

Thousands of 'directly hackable' hospital devices exposed online

Derbycon Thousands of critical medical systems – including Magnetic Resonance Imaging machines and nuclear medicine devices – that are vulnerable to attack have been found exposed online. Security researchers Scott Erven and Mark Collao found, for one example, a "very large" unnamed US healthcare organization exposing more than 68,000 …
Darren Pauli, 29 Sep 2015

Tobacco field bacteria offers hope for buzz-kill smoking therapy

Help may soon be at hand for those who have tried and failed to quit smoking, thanks to a bacterium that guzzles down nicotine. Chemistry boffins reckon the organism may hold the key to a future anti-smoking therapy. An enzyme from the Pseudomonas putida bacterium – originally isolated from soil in a tobacco field – consumes …
John Leyden, 7 Aug 2015
IBM 5150 PC

Don't believe the hype: When that DATA seems just too good

I admit, I tend to the slightly conservative when it comes to publishing in peer-reviewed journals – a title such as ‘Li Fraumeni syndrome, cancer and senescence: a new hypothesis’ is as racy as it gets. Not so with some authors: Aussie computer scientist Dr Peter Vamplew scored headlines worldwide when the International …
Crop of doctor with pen and clipboard

Is there a cure for cancer sitting at the back of the medicine cabinet already?

A solid tumour is the perfect example of a complex adaptive system at work. It is an ecosystem with competitive and cooperative networks of cells at play. This is one of the reasons why cancer is so difficult to treat. Historically, the approach has been to blast tumours with the most toxic drugs at our disposal – cytotoxic …
Richard Bedford's bacon on a roll with melted cheese

Eat FATTY FOODS to stay THIN. They might even help your heart

Have our health authorities been spouting unscientific nonsense for the last few decades? Dr Pan Pantziarka looks at whether official advice on fatty foods has been wrong all along. Richard Bedford A reduction in dietary fat consumption, especially saturated fat, has been the cornerstone of official dietary advice for as …
Toilet

The next big thing in medical science: POO TRANSPLANTS

This is an article that some readers, particularly those of a fainter-hearted disposition, might want to avoid. It’s about a big movement that some people might find a tad distasteful. For those of a more intrepid nature: we’re going to be looking at something called “microbiome” and the impact this is having in a wide range …

Bad back? Show some spine and stop popping paracetamol

The human spine is poorly-designed for the rigours of modern life, but so are the drugs most commonly prescribed to help you endure a bad back. That's the conclusion of a new study looking into whether paracetamol, the drug most often suggested to treat bad backs, actually helps. Reported in The Lancet, the study funded by …
Simon Sharwood, 24 Jul 2014

Research bods told: Try to ID anonymised data subjects? No more CASH for you

Medical research funding bodies in the UK may withdraw support for projects where researchers attempt to work out the identity of individuals behind anonymised data without the subjects' permission. Cancer Research UK, the Economic and Social Research Council, the Medical Research Council and the Wellcome Trust said funding …
OUT-LAW.COM, 27 Mar 2014

Want FREE BEER for the rest of your life?

We'd all like to save money on beer: we journos perhaps more than most as we are a notoriously thirsty bunch and expense accounts just aren't what they were in the old days. The most obvious method of doing so, rising up and slaughtering those who tax and water the workers' beer, isn't really viable. So, as so often in this …
Tim Worstall, 23 Sep 2013

Hankering for a Nobel Prize? EAT MORE CHOCOLATE

A California researcher has discovered a strong correlation between chocolate consumption and the degree of smarts that results in being awarded a Noble Prize. In "Chocolate habits of Nobel prizewinners", published in Thursday's edition of Nature, Beatrice Golomb of the University of California, San Diego, notes that of the 23 …
Rik Myslewski, 25 Jul 2013
Wife dressed as nurse administers last act of mercy

Put up your ... err ... hand for free vasectomy streamed online

Mark this one down in your diaries, Reg readers: October 18th is the first World Vasectomy Day, and if you're game you'll be able to get the snip for free by agreeing to have the operation streamed online. The host for this spectacle will be the Royal Institution of Australia (RiAus), which thinks the day and its message of …
iPhone microscope

Medicos hack iPhone into lab 'scope

Take an iPhone, a cheap camera lens, double-sided tape and lab slides and what do you get? In Tanzania, a device that helps diagnose intestinal worms. While it may sound trivial, the medicos say that there are infections in around two billion people worldwide, mostly children, and they can cause malnutrition. It's easy to …
The Register breaking news

Brit boffins build projectile-vomiting robot to kill norovirus

Vid Bioboffins at the Health and Safety Laboratory in Derbyshire, UK, have developed a robot that can projectile vomit on command as a tool for studying the spread of the highly infectious norovirus. Reuters reports that the hyperemetic droid has been dubbed "Vomiting Larry" by its creator, researcher Catherine Makison, who …
The Register breaking news

Bio-integrated circuitry melds man and machine

IEDM If you want to marry rigid silicon with soft, stretchy human tissue, it's best to create silicon devices that can conform, stretch, and live in harmony with living flesh. So says University of Illinois professor John Rogers, who provided an update on his work with bio-integrated and transient electronics to the attendees of …
Rik Myslewski, 11 Dec 2012
Open-mouthed Burmese python

Boffins prescribe SNAKE VENOM as future pain killer

The venom of the Black Mamba, rated the world's seventh most potent snake poison, has been suggested as a future painkiller for humans. A letter in Nature suggests the application is viable as the venom contains “a new class of three-finger peptides … able to abolish pain through inhibition of Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs …
The Register breaking news

Sun daddy: 'Machines will replace 80 per cent of doctors'

According to Sun Microsystems cofounder and serial entrepreneur Vinod Khosla, 80 per cent of doctors could be replaced by machines – computing devices backed by imense data sets. Speaking at the recent Health Innovation Summit in San Francisco, Khosla referred to today's physicians as "voodoo doctors," noting that "Health care …
Rik Myslewski, 3 Sep 2012
The Register breaking news

Bio-boffins create world's first digital STD

A bacterium that in humans can cause genital pain, itching, and a burning sensation while urinating has become the subject of the first-ever complete software simulation of an entire organism, the New York Times reports. The simulation is the work of a team of boffins from Stanford University and the J. Craig Venter Institute …
Neil McAllister, 20 Jul 2012
The Register breaking news

Ludicrously lucky teen survives spear through brain

Sixteen-year-old Yasser Lopez will likely have a "miraculous recovery" despite a three-foot spear having been thrust through his head. "If you had to have a spear go through there [the head], then this spear chose the right path to go with the least damage," neurosurgeon Ross Bullock told ABC News. The Reg admits to some …
Rik Myslewski, 19 Jun 2012

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