Articles about health

Have YOU had your breakfast pint? Boffins confirm cheeky daily tipple is good for you

A major study of Americans has punched another hole in the official British government medical advice that there's no "safe level" of drinking. The cohort study of around 100,000 individuals found that infrequent drinkers and teetotallers had an increased risk of mortality. "Combined risk of cancer or death was lowest in …
Andrew Orlowski, 22 Jun 2018

No top-ups, please, I'm a millennial: Lightweight yoof shunning booze like never before

New official drinking statistics confirm that millennials are more sober than their lush parents – and drink less than any other age group. The Office of National Statistics reports that teetotalism is rising among all age groups under 44 and declining with the over-65s. Despite the lurid headlines, Britain is in fact drying …
Soviet Alcohol Propaganda

Britain ignores booze guidelines – heads for the pub

A University of Sheffield study has found that controversial new alcohol guidelines published in 2016 had no discernible effect on British drinking habits. "We cannot find any evidence of change in the COM-B determinants of drinking behaviour corresponding to the publication and promotion of the new lower risk drinking …
Apple

Apple 'wellness' unit launched for staff: The genius will see you now

Faulty Apple units can now be taken in for repair, with Cupertino having reportedly opened a care service dedicated to fixing staff. The tech giant appears to be opening a series of health clinics called AC Wellness for its employees and their families. The AC Wellness site describes the venture as "an independent medical …
Kat Hall, 28 Feb 2018
currywurst sausage covered in sauce and accompanied by fries/chips

Arrrgh! Put down the crisps! 'Ultra-processed' foods linked to cancer!

A study has suggested a link between diets high in ultra-processed foods and an increased risk of cancer – but academics have warned against over-interpreting the results. The work, published in the BMJ, assessed the diets – as reported through a survey – and cancer risk of a group of almost 105,000 French men and women. It …
Rebecca Hill, 15 Feb 2018

So... Nokia's taking a long, hard look at its health unit

Nokia appears to be revising its ambition to be the data kingpin of the digital health industry. The Finnish telecomms giant has put its Digital Health business up for “strategic review”. This “may or may not result in any transaction or other changes”, it says coyly. Over the past two years, Nokia has quietly assembled a …
Andrew Orlowski, 15 Feb 2018

Online GP surgery biz Babylon gives up fight against Brit health watchdog, owes £11k

Digital health outfit Babylon has withdrawn a legal challenge against the UK's Care Quality Commission (CQC) concerning a report into its practice's operations. The biz, which lets people video chat with and text doctors rather than seeing them in person, will have to cough up £11,000 in costs. Yesterday Rebecca Lloyd-Jones, …
Richard Priday, 21 Dec 2017
Crop of doctor with pen and clipboard

Fridge killed my baby? Mag-field radiation from household stuff 'boosts miscarriage risk'

Analysis A study of 913 pregnant women in the San Francisco Bay Area, California, found those exposed to high levels of magnetic field (MF) non-ionizing radiation had a 2.72x higher risk of miscarriage than those exposed to low MF levels. The Kaiser Permanente study, "Exposure to Magnetic Field Non-Ionizing Radiation and the Risk of …
Thomas Claburn, 19 Dec 2017
Pixellated Facebook thumb

Facebook confesses: Facebook is bad for you

Facebook has just publicly slapped itself upside the head, admitting that its very existence is often detrimental to the wellbeing of its users. An analysis today from Facebook's research director David Ginsberg and research scientist Moira Burke serves as a mea culpa of sorts from Zuck and Co about the emotional and mental …
Shaun Nichols, 15 Dec 2017
Fitbit Ionic smartwatch

Fitbit health alert: You appear to be bleeding

Fitbit's year-on-year losses grew fivefold to $113.4m compared to a year ago, with sales of 3.6 million devices in the quarter, 7 per cent up from the previous quarter. The firm admitted it had been a "difficult year" as the fitness band craze diminished, with sales down considerably compared to the same period of 2016. …
tattoo

Harvard, MIT boffins ink up with health-monitoring 'smart' tats

Researchers at Harvard and MIT have developed a subdermal ink capable of monitoring vitals such as hydration and blood sugar. The team of eight researchers found that by mixing optical biosensors with tattoo ink, they are able to create tattoos (dubbed "dermal abyss" or "d-abyss") that react with the body's own fluids and …
Shaun Nichols, 29 Sep 2017

Programmer's < fumble jeopardizes thousands of medical reports

A bug in code that generates medical reports could force patients in Ireland to repeat their hospital and clinic scans. The Emerald Isle's healthcare bosses have admitted a flaw in the PACS software used to store documents in its National Integrated Medical Imaging System (NIMIS) causes some records to not display a single, …
Shaun Nichols, 3 Aug 2017
Steady-Hand Eye robot

Robo-surgeons, self-driving cars face similar legal, ethical headaches

As drivers contemplate computer controlled cars, physicians get to ponder self-driven surgery tools. In a research paper published on Wednesday, "Robot Autonomy for Surgery," UC San Diego assistant professor Michael Yip and PhD student Nikhil Das explore the growing role played by surgical robots and the issues raised by …
Thomas Claburn, 13 Jul 2017
Graduate student Seongjun Park holds an example of a new flexible fiber

MIT goes down to the wire: Brain cable pipes electricity, chemicals, light straight into minds

MIT brain boffins have developed a tiny fiber that can carry chemical, electrical, and optical signals back and forth between the brain and an external device, offering an improved path for testing brain functions and interactions. The fiber is 200 micrometers wide, comparable to the width of a human hair. Described in a paper …
Thomas Claburn, 23 Feb 2017
Robert Wood

IT bosses: Get budgets for better security by rating threats on a scale of zero to Yahoo!

BSides SF What do you reckon US government regulations on computer security look like? If you selected outdated, contradictory and avoidable, congrats, you're an industry veteran – or you were paying attention to a talk this morning at the BSidesSF 2017 infosec conference. In a presentation titled "Swimming upstream: regulation vs …
Iain Thomson, 13 Feb 2017
Man with a vaper apparatus - face obscured by smoke/vapour. Photo by Shutterstock

Vapists rejoice! E-cigs lower cancer risk (if you stop smoking, duh)

The first long-term, real-world study on carcinogens in e-cigarettes has found that they are significantly safer than smoking. The study by UCL's tobacco research group found that smokers who switched to e-cigarettes had significantly lower levels of tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) …

Stanford boffins find 'correlation between caffeine consumption and longevity'

A cup of tea, coffee or even a mocha could extend your life, new research shows. The Stanford University research published in the journal Nature reveals how a cuppa can directly combat underlying chronic inflammatory processes, particularly in older people. Inflammation is a critical process which helps the body fight …
Darren Pauli, 17 Jan 2017

Could YOU survive a zombie apocalypse? Uni eggheads say you'd last just 100 days

Physics students at the UK's University of Leicester have concluded that a "real-life zombie outbreak" would all but eliminate humanity in just 100 days. Ignoring more plausible threats like flu pandemic, Pumpkin Spice Latte poisoning, or tweet-triggered nuclear annihilation, Leicester students CT Davies, KJ Cheshire, R …

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