Articles about gravity

All aboard the Vomit Comet: Not the last train to Essex, but a modded 727 for weightless flight

Anyone who has grown up watching the antics of Apollo astronauts aboard Skylab or the acrobatics of Shuttle and ISS crews has likely dreamed of experiencing weightlessness. Ideally in a way that doesn't involve either a sickening drop in an elevator or alarming turbulence over the Atlantic. But for those lacking the budget to …
Richard Speed, 18 Jan 2018

Physicists win Nobel Prize for spotting ripples in fabric of space-time

The 2017 Nobel Prize in physics has been awarded to three researchers crucial to the first detection of ripples in the fabric of space-time – gravitational waves. Half the prize went to MIT physicist Rainer Weiss and the other half to California Institute of Technology physicists Barry Barish and Kip Thorne. They're all …
Andrew Silver, 3 Oct 2017
Big Bang

Gravitational waves: A new type of astronomy

The first time physicists announced that the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) had detected gravitational waves, on September 14, 2015, it was breaking news. The discovery coincided with the 100-year anniversary of Einstein's theory of General Relativity, which predicted the existence of gravitational …
Katyanna Quach, 20 Jun 2016

Cats understand the laws of physics, researchers claim

Using a plastic container, some magnets, three iron balls, two video cameras and 30 cats, researchers from Kyoto University have concluded that felines understand the laws of physics. The research paper titled There's no ball without noise: cats' prediction of an object from noise was published in Animal Cognition. Twenty-two …
Katyanna Quach, 15 Jun 2016
Black hole - spaghetti visualisation. Artist's impression.  NASA/JPL-Caltech, CC BY-SA

Space boffins win $3m prize for discovering gravitational waves

The team of scientists involved in the successful detection of gravitational waves has been awarded the Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics – along with $3m. The Breakthrough Prizes, awarded for scientific achievements, are funded by Russian billionaire and physicist Yuri Milner, along with tech entrepreneurs …
The Microscope satellite. Pic: CNES / D.Ducros

Galileo in spaaace: France's 'equivalence principle' satellite

Earlier this week, France's snappily-named "Micro-Satellite à traînée Compensée pour l'Observation du Principe d'Equivalence", aka Microscope, rode a Soyuz lifter to orbit on a mission to " test the equivalence principle, which postulates the equality between gravitational mass and inertial mass". Legend has it that in around …
Lester Haines, 28 Apr 2016

Five key findings from 15 years of the International Space Station

The International Space Station is the longest-running continuously inhabited human outpost in space, and this year it celebrated its 15th anniversary. As the ISS orbits the Earth it is essentially in a state of free fall, counteracting the Earth’s gravity and providing an ideal platform for science in space. Science aboard …

NASA boffin: RIDDLE of odd BULGE FOUND on MOON is SOLVED

An analysis of the shape of the Moon has shown it is not actually a sphere – but is in fact slightly lemon-shaped. This has revealed important clues as to how the Earth's satellite body formed (and no, it still doesn't involve any cheese). A paper published in the July 30 issue of Nature by Ian Garrick-Bethell – an assistant …
Iain Thomson, 31 Jul 2014
The Register breaking news

Is NASA planning to send LAVA LAMPS to Jupiter?

You know how it is: you're crashed on the sofa quaffing a beer and staring pensively at your hypnotic lava lamp when you're suddenly struck by the overwhelming desire to find out if the 1960s design classic* would work on Jupiter. Well, the good news is that Google software engineer Neil Fraser has answered this vital galactic …
Lester Haines, 14 Aug 2013
Gravity Trailer Still

Honey, I BLEW UP the International SPACE STATION - in full 3D

A few years ago the idea of accelerating a BlueArc filer would have seemed bizarre; it's got its own hardware acceleration. But now media special effects processing can be so mind-blowingly intensive that the hardware accelerated filer itself needs accelerating. The case that's illustrating this point is the new George Clooney …
Chris Mellor, 17 May 2013
The Register breaking news

Asteroid belts could be key to finding intelligent life

A new study suggests that having the right kind of asteroid belt in a solar system could be essential to finding intelligent life in the universe – including here on Earth. A team from NASA and the UK's Royal Astronomical Society has been studying the role of asteroid belts in the evolution of life on Earth and in the wider …
Iain Thomson, 2 Nov 2012
The Register breaking news

First scientific paper filed from Spaaaace published today

Hard-working astro-boffins have filed a scientific paper from space. Published today in the journal Europhysics Letters, it is believed to be the first article in an earthly publication ever to have been submitted from outside the planet. Editor Michael Schreiber said that the journal had always attracted manuscripts from …
Anna Leach, 11 Nov 2011
The Register breaking news

Siphon Wars: Pressurist weighs into Gravitite boffin

We've just had a missive from a US reader regarding that most pressing scientific question of the moment: Just how do siphons work? Those of you with a scientific bent will recall the recent Oxford English Dictionary outrage, in which one Dr Stephen Hughes of Queensland University of Technology laid bare a 99-year-old gaffe in …
Lester Haines, 17 May 2010
The Register breaking news

Swivel-shed v polar stilt-scope in Big Bang boffinry clash

International brainboxes operating a fiendishly cunning probe contained in a small rotating shed on a pole situated in the arid high-altitude desert of Chile are in a race against rival boffins with a telescope on stilts at the South Pole to discover how the universe was born. The two crews of elite brains are looking to …
Lewis Page, 18 May 2009
The Register breaking news

Euro ion-rocket sat launch success

The European space agency's dart-shaped GOCE satellite, designed to skim through the extreme upper atmosphere using ion drives to compensate for air drag, has launched successfully from Plesetsk cosmodrome in northern Russia. Artist's impression of the GOCE spacecraft in orbit GOCE had been scheduled for launch yesterday, …
Lewis Page, 17 Mar 2009
The Register breaking news

Upper-atmos ion drive dart sat launch delayed

Updated A new European satellite which will fly aerodynamically through the extreme upper reaches of the atmosphere, using ion rocket propulsion to maintain orbital speed, has been held up on the launch pad with just seconds left on the countdown. Artist's impression of the GOCE spacecraft in orbit The ion ship, buffeted by upper- …
Lewis Page, 16 Mar 2009
The Register breaking news

DARPA to build nothingness detector for tunnel sniffing

Renowned US military tech bureau DARPA has issued a request for an ultrasensitive gravity-measuring instrument which could be mounted in a low flying aircraft and detect underground tunnels. The project, known as Gravity Anomaly for Tunnel Exposure (GATE), was formally announced on Friday. In essence, it will detect an absence …
Lewis Page, 16 Mar 2009
The Register breaking news

Boffinry bitchslap brouhaha: Higgs and Hawking head to head

Famous retired physics prof Peter Higgs - of boson renown - has stingingly counter-poohpoohed the theories of his equally well known Nobel Prize rival, Stephen Hawking, who has already poohpoohed Higgs' particle concept. The clash of intellects is expected to be settled by particle-punishment results at the Large Hadron Collider …
Lewis Page, 11 Sep 2008

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