Articles about graphene

Graphene photo via Shutterstock

GRAPHENE: £120m down, UK.gov finds it's still a long way from commercial potential

Graphene, the material with many extraordinary properties, has swallowed around £120m in UK government funds, but development and commercialisation is proving tortuously slow and increasingly dogged with disappointment. So concerned are MPs with the lack of progress that late last year they conducted a series of hearings via …
Marcus Gibson, 14 Feb 2017
Surprised man photo via Shutterstock

'Mafia' of ageing scientists, academics and politicos suck at picking tech 'winners'

Rarely has a report on industrial strategy, unveiled by the Prime Minister Theresa May at the Sci-Tech Daresbury centre in the North West on January 23 contained so little about industry. The strategy is built on what the Government is calling 10 "pillars": including investment in science, research and innovation, developing …
Marcus Gibson, 1 Feb 2017
gyroid

MIT brainiacs wrangle 2D graphene into super-strong 3D art homework

Video Graphene is said to be the wonder material of our age, but it’s largely a 2D affair. Now scientists have made 3D structures out of the stuff that will be an engineer’s dream. Since the first atom-thick strips of graphene were produced, the substance has shown remarkable properties, including extraordinary strength and …
Iain Thomson, 12 Jan 2017

Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it's... er, Graphene bubbles – 200 times stronger than Superman

Tiny graphene bubbles can withstand enormous pressures and are 200 times stronger than steel, according to scientists at the University of Manchester in the UK. Results published today in Nature Communications reveal yet another superior property in graphene, also known as the "miracle material." Stacking graphene on top of …
Katyanna Quach, 25 Aug 2016

Graphene is actually self-folding origami, proclaim physicists

Physicists have observed a new behaviour in graphene sheets that causes them to spontaneously grow, tear and peel like self-folding origami. Carbon is a versatile element and can form many types of bonds with different elements – including itself. Diamond, bucky-balls and graphene are all allotropes of carbon – they are all …
Katyanna Quach, 14 Jul 2016
graphene

Much more Moore's Law: Wonder-stuff graphene transistor trickery

Scientists have developed a way to “chemically grow” transistors that are only a few atoms thick in a bid to give poor old battered Moore's Law another reprieve, according to new research published in Nature Nanotechnology. Packing more transistors on a microchip becomes increasingly difficult as shortening the distance …
Katyanna Quach, 11 Jul 2016
Solar flare

Graphene solar panels harvest energy from rain

Solar panels could generate power at night and during inclement weather by harvesting energy from raindrops, research finds. The panels are built from highly-conductive graphene. In the presence of water, the material binds positively charged ions with its electrons. It is difficult to mass produce. Key to the operation of …
Darren Pauli, 12 Apr 2016
Graphene on glass schematic

A glass of soda-and-lime is the straight dope for graphene

Researchers from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in the United States have turned up an unexpected property of common glass: it makes a good substrate for graphene-based electronics in applications like solar cells and touch-screens. While graphene has had “wonder-material” status for a few years now, it's difficult …
Tin

Playing with graphene? All the cool kids are using TIN – atom-thick sheets of stanene

Researchers at Stanford have laid down the first atom-thick sheet of tin, and it has the potential to revolutionize electronics thanks to its unique power propagation properties. The material has been dubbed stanene, a contraction of the Latin word for tin "stannum" and the "ene" suffix used for 2D materials. It does for the …
Iain Thomson, 4 Aug 2015
This is graphene-based film on an electronic component with high heat intensity. Pic credit: Johan Liu / Chamers University of Technology

Cool-headed boffins overcome sticky issue: Graphene-based film could turn heat down

A graphene-based film could help to cool down overheating microelectronic devices, scientists have claimed in a new study. Researchers at Chalmers University, led by professor Johan Liu, have developed the 20 micrometre-thick film, which apparently has a thermal conductivity capacity of 1,600 W/mK – four times that of copper …
Kelly Fiveash, 11 Jul 2015
graphene

Graphene sheaths could boost processor signal speeds by 30 per cent

Scientists at Stanford have found a new use for graphene that will significantly increase the speed of standard computer processors. Most chips use copper interconnects to route signals around their semiconductor circuits, and these are typically insulated with a coating of tantalum nitride. The Stanford team instead used an …
Iain Thomson, 18 Jun 2015
Dr Hermann Hauser addresses Pioneers Festival 2015

Hyperloop tube trains, killer AI, and virtual skydiving: Yes, it's the Pioneers Festival

Pioneers Festival 2015 is under way in Vienna – the event where hundreds of breathless startups go in search of funding or to publicize their bright ideas. Pioneers is about future technology, but Dr Hermann Hauser, cofounder of Acorn Computers, kicked off the event with a journey into the past. The 1949 EDSAC 1 computer was …
Tim Anderson, 29 May 2015
IBM_Spintronics

Graphene spintronics crowned latest Moore's Law extender contender

Wonder material graphene could provide the basis for the future of circuitry, by using a technique known as spintronics, boffins have mused. Spintronics uses the spin of individual electrons as the encoding method for data. This is significantly smaller than using charge, which requires thousands of electrons. Unfortunately, …
Simon Rockman, 16 Apr 2015
Inside the Google Lab where surgeons prepare the human/dog experiment

IBM's $3bn bet on next-gen computers: Carbon nanotubes, neuro chips

IBM boffins have been given a tidy $3bn cash pile to solve a problem that lurks not too far in our future. That problem is the imminent breakdown in conventional chip operation and chip materials as we shrink transistor gates from today's 14nm process size to 10nm and 7nm. At around 7nm, which most industry observers expect …
Jack Clark, 9 Jul 2014

Get BENT: Flexy supercapacitor breaks records

It doesn't sound like a huge number, but 6.3 milliwatt-hours per cubic mm is a breakthrough: it's the highest volumetric energy density so far achieved in a microscale carbon-based supercapacitor. Such devices are keenly sought in electronics research to drive the growing wearables market, since battery life is a big issue …
Put your iPhone in the blender

Boffins brew graphene in kitchen blender

Take pencil leads, detergent, water, stick them in a high-power kitchen blender, and the result? A brew containing the wonder-stuff graphene. Funded by UK chemicals company Thomas Swan, researchers from Trinity College Dublin were working on a way to produce graphene at industrial scale. As noted in Nature, the real work was …

Too late, Blighty! Samsung boffins claim breakthrough graphene manufacturing success

A group of 14 Korean researchers, including 10 from the Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, have published details of a technique for synthesising graphene that could lead to sheets of the thin, strong, conductive wonder-material-du-jour being used in commercial devices sooner rather than later. Their paper, published …
Rik Myslewski, 4 Apr 2014
Our night-vision image of the average middle-aged sex session

Want to see at night? Here comes the infrared CONTACT LENS

University of Michigan boffins have created a tiny light detector that reaches into the infared, and is already small enough to be delivered as a contact lens. The key trick, the researchers say, is that they've created an infrared detector that doesn't need the cooling demanded by most devices that currently operate at the …

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