Articles about csiro

CSIRO Parkes radio telescope

Pulsars: the GPS beacons of the cosmos

Want to navigate over huge distances with nearly superhuman accuracy? All you need is a laptop, the right software, and some way to keep track of the signals of distant pulsars. What began as an attempt to improve the search for gravitational waves has had the unexpected secondary outcome of demonstrating that pulsars could …
Dave Akerman inflates the balloon

CSIRO, Macquarie University, on helium-saving crusade

Rather than sending out dire warnings about the dangers of party balloons wasting helium, it's probably better to stem the losses from the world's largest users. That's the approach being taken by the CSIRO and Sydney's Macquarie University. Cryogenics, as The Register noted here, is a big consumer of helium. In 2005, the US …
RV Investigator design graphic

CSIRO seeks seagoing sysadmin

Fleeing flocks of furious testers who think your last beta was more like a pre-alpha compiled after a Friday night bender? Or perhaps you're more the independent operator who wants an environment in which the PHB* is far, far away and your users are a captive audience. CSIRO has just the thing for you: with a new ship lining …
CSIRO's giant titanium bugs

I, for one, welcome our GIANT TITANIUM INSECT OVERLORDS

What started out as an art project using Australian think-tank CSIRO's additive titanium 3D printer has turned out to have much more serious application: scaled-up versions of microscopic bugs that make it easier to study their biology. Originally, the minute insects from the Australian National Insect Collection were scanned …
CSIRO's large-scale solar cell printer

CSIRO scales up solar cell printing

One of the big problems in the world of printed solar cells is scale: it's much easier to print a cell the size of a fingernail than one of useful size. Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) believes a process announced last week changes all that. Doing the hard work is a $AUD200,000 …
The Register breaking news

CSIRO backing broadband app comp

Entries are now open for a $AU50,000 CSIRO and industry-sponsored competition to foster broadband application development. The prize is designed to spark the development of applications that take advantage of the kind of connectedness envisaged under the NBN, the agency says. Through its Australian Centre for Broadband …
CSIRO test image PKS 0407-658

Australian supercomputer to use geothermal cooling

As Australia’s Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope takes shape, CSIRO has begun drilling in an unusual approach to cooling supercomputers. The petascale powerhouse needed by ASKAP is being built in water-short Perth, so instead of sucking nearly 40 million litres of water from the city’s supply, CSIRO plans a …
The Register breaking news

CSIRO: Landscape is biggest carbon sink

New research published by the CSIRO has found that Australia’s landscape is by far the country’s largest carbon sink. However, its nowhere near enough, absorbing just one-third of the national fossil fuel emissions over the last 30 years. The research, published in the open-access Biogeosciences (abstract here with link to …

Soak up CO2 with sponges, says CSIRO

Australian science outfit the CSIRO is claiming a win, demonstrating a material it says offers a new approach to carbon capture: a sponge. The idea of the “sponge” – really a material called a metal-organic framework – is very straightforward. It absorbs gases at the point of release, such as capturing flue gases in a power …
The Register breaking news

Boffins take the temperature of the cosmos

The universe is cold and getting colder, according to work by an international team of scientists working with CSIRO’s Australia Telescope Compact Array near the NSW town of Narrabri. The group has pinned the average temperature of the universe at 2.73 Kelvin – not far above absolute zero – but more impressively, it’s also …

CSIRO mine safety tech becomes archaeological tool

A 3D mapping technology announced earlier this year by Australia’s science agency CSIRO is being used to help map what might be the world’s oldest cave etchings. During December, CSIRO scientists undertook an exploration on behalf of the Adelaide museum, in which they took the technology known as Zebedee into the delicate …
CSIRO Logo

CSIRO top brass sent to anti-bully boot camp

Australia's nexus for scientific research, the CSIRO, is continuing to grapple with the fallout from allegations of widespread bullying practices through the organisation. In an internal email to all staff from the CSIRO’s CEO Dr Megan Clark distributed yesterday, the chief executive addressed concerns and outlined the steps …
CSIRO Logo

The big bully theory investigated at CSIRO

Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation - better known as CSIRO - is rife with bullying according to an assessment by workplace relations body Comcare. The bullying claims follow investigation of a dozen claims from employees. Comcare has since issued an improvement notice to the organisation, …
Cellular antenna. Source: Vxla/Flickr

Cutbacks hit CSIRO wireless unit

One of the CSIRO’s most successful research units – at least measured by the royalties it generates – is being slimmed down, according to the CSIRO Staff Association. The union has called the job cuts “baffling” given the value of wireless research to the scientific body. Through a series of long-running lawsuits with vendors …

CSIRO creates underwater bomb-sensor

America’s Sky Research and the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) have teamed up with CSIRO scientists to create a more sensitive detector for unexploded bombs in the ocean. The problem of unexploded ordinance underwater is bigger than you might realise, with the SERDP estimating that in the US, …
Cellular antenna. Source: Vxla/Flickr

CSIRO scales 50 Mbps wireless broadband to 16 nodes

Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) has revealed that new trials of its Ngara wireless broadband system have scaled a single base station from six to 16 users. Speaking at the Physics in Industry Day hosted by the Australian Institute of Physics, Dr Iain Collings, Research Director …
Simon Sharwood, 12 Nov 2012
Phytoplankton bloom captured by Envisat

Satellite data gets a dose of Google cloudy goodness

Google is teaming up with CSIRO via its Google Earth Outreach Program to put cloud-based satellite image analysis in front of earth sciences researchers. While there are plenty of public sources for satellite data – such as NASA, for example – turning images into analysis is a power-hungry business. First, you have to locate …
Artist's impression of a lightning storm on Venus. Credit: ESA

Australian boffins have a ball with lightning maths

Scientists at Australia’s CSIRO have put forward a mathematical model which they believe could help explain the origin of ball lightning. While people have observed ball lightning for centuries – at least – explaining it has been so troublesome that it’s attracted a variety of strange hypotheses – all the way to microwave …

Create a news alert about csiro, or find more stories about csiro.

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017