Articles about computing

Fewer than half GCSE computing students got a B or higher this year

The UK government has been told to tackle teacher shortages in Blighty – and offer more support for those now teaching tougher syllabuses – as GCSE computing results showed little improvement on last year. Today's results show a marginal improvement on the 2016 figures – this year, 41 per cent gained a B or higher, compared …
Rebecca Hill, 24 Aug 2017

2 kool 4 komputing: Teens' interest in GCSE course totally bombs

The number of pupils signing up for GCSE computing has plateaued just years after the qualification was introduced, raising concerns that not enough is being done to help teachers with more difficult courses. According to the latest figures from exam watchdog Ofqual, 67,800 pupils were due to sit the GCSE (General Certificate …
Rebecca Hill, 19 Jun 2017
shutterstock_306575414_woman_programmer

Computer Science GCSE male dominated, but geekettes are ready to rise

More teenagers than ever are studying computing, with a growing proportion being female, ladies, or persons of the contradictory gender. Figures from the Joint Council for Qualifications show that the new GCSE subject of Computer Science is enjoying rapid growth. It was brought in to supplement ICT (Information and …
Simon Rockman, 20 Aug 2015

UK's National Museum of Computing celebrates 10 glorious years

The National Museum of Computing (TNMoC), which yesterday celebrated its tenth anniversary as an independent organisation, will this coming weekend formally inaugurate a new membership club for enthusiasts of Britain’s computing heritage, and supporters of the museum. The decade has not been without its growing pains, among …
Tony Smith, 1 Apr 2015
Array of multicoloured LEDs reminiscent of the matrix

Quantum computers have failed. So now for the science

I am a heretic. There, I've said it. My heresy? I don't believe that quantum computers can ever work. I've been a cryptographer for over 20 years and for all that time we've been told that sooner or later someone would build a quantum computer that would factor large numbers easily, making our current systems useless. However …
Ross Anderson, 9 Mar 2015
Bletchley Park

Google backs gallery of computer-crazed female boffinry at Bletchley Park

Google UK has sponsored a new gallery celebrating the achievements of women in computing at The National Museum of Computing (TNMOC) in Bletchley Park. Women in Computing Gallery at The National Museum of Computing The new exhibition opened as part of a "Google-inspired Heroines of Computing" event, according to TNMOC*. The …
Team Register, 10 Sep 2013
DARPA logo

DARPA shells out $194m for 'phase 6' of STARnet chip project

War tech agency DARPA is not happy with the pace of progress in semiconductors, so it has been funding primary research through a program called Semiconductor Technology Advanced Research Network - or STARnet for short, for the past several years. And it has now announced that it is kicking in another $194m over the next five …
EDSAC

Bletchley Park boffins start trailblazer EDSAC computer rebuild

Physical production of a replica of EDSAC, aka the Electronic Delay Storage Automatic Calculator, has at last begun at The National Museum of Computing, located at World War II crypto centre Bletchley Park. EDSAC is an early computer originally put together at Cambridge University in the late 1940s. The initial work on the …
Tony Smith, 9 Jan 2013
2000AD Prog 1 snippet

Making MACH 1: Can we build a cranial computer today?

Monitor is an occasional column written at the crossroads where the arts, popular culture and technology intersect. Here, we look back at 2000AD's MACH 1 - the first secret agent with his own, in-body computer. In 1977, Pat Mills, the first Editor of 2000AD comic, created MACH 1, a strip telling the story of John Probe, a super- …
Tony Smith, 2 Jan 2013
ZX80

A history of personal computing in 20 objects part 2

Archaeologic Personal computing may have originally been more ‘computing’ than ‘personal, but that changed in the late 1970s in the US and, in the UK, during the early 1980s. In the first part of ‘A History of Personal Computing on 20 Objects’, we saw how computing went from maths gadgets to first mechanical, then electromechanical and …
Tony Smith, 2 Nov 2012
Apple

Analyst slams Apple innovation FAIL

One Wall Street analyst has lashed out at Apple, claiming the Mac maker's innovation is "sputtering" on the back of its failure to introduce touchscreen notebooks and desktop all-in-ones. Despite anticipation of a record holiday quarter, the Cupertino firm lacks the inventive touch it once had, Global Equities Research MD Trip …
Caleb Cox, 1 Nov 2012
Babbage Difference Engine No. 1

A history of personal computing in 20 objects part 1

Archaeologic Personal computing. Personal. Computing. We take both aspects so completely for granted these days, it's almost impossible to think of a time when computing wasn't personal - or when there was no electronic or mechanical computing. To get from there to here, we've gone from a time when 'computers' were people able to do perform …
Tony Smith, 1 Nov 2012
Apple

Gavel fails to fall for Apple 1

An original Apple 1 made by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak failed to sell at an auction in London this week after bidders refused to meet its reserve price. The 1976 computer - which comes without a screen and a mere 4KB of memory - was expected to be snapped up for £80,000. However, the top bid of £32,000 wasn't high enough to …
Caleb Cox, 10 Oct 2012
Acorn promotes Archimedes 300 series

Strong ARM: The Acorn Archimedes is 25

Archaeologic The Acorn Archimedes is 25 years old this month. The first machines based on the company's ARM (Acorn Risc Machine) processor were announced in June 1987, the year after the 32-bit chip itself was launched. Four versions of the Archimedes were released in 1987: the A305, A310, A410 and A440. The first two had 512KB and 1MB of …
Tony Smith, 1 Jun 2012
Apple

'Woz' wants $100,000 for Mac 128K prototype

A functional Macintosh 128k prototype has been put up for sale on eBay, complete with rare "Twiggy" 5.25in floppy drive, original keyboard, mouse and power lead. The only non-authentic thing here is that the seller, who calls himself 'Woz', isn't actually Apple co-founder, Steve Wozniak - a fact he's happy to highlight - but …
Caleb Cox, 12 Apr 2012
Sony

Sony waves hello to Vaio lappy with gesture control

Reg Hardware Gizmo Week logo small Sony has unveiled its latest notebook refresh, the Vaio E series 14, a lightweight laptop with gesture control. The Vaio E series packs an Intel Core i3 processor with 4GB of DDR3 memory and a 1GB AMD Radeon HD graphics chip. There's also 500GB of hard drive storage, a DVD drive, a pair of …
Caleb Cox, 10 Apr 2012
Cat 5 cable

Boffin melds quantum processor with quantum RAM

A California physicist has created a quantum-computing chip based on the CPU/RAM combo known as the von Neumann architecture, opening the door, he argues, to commercial quantum-computing development. "I think it's very exciting as a researcher because we're really at the borderline between the two worlds of physics and …
Rik Myslewski, 2 Sep 2011
Apple MacBook Air 11.6in

Stealth-cam software snaps laptop looter

A laptop thief has been busted after a security application activated the computer's built-in camera, snapped shots of the crook and sent them back to the original owner. A few months ago, Joshua Kaufman had his Macbook nicked from his apartment in Oakland, CA. Instead of wallowing in despair, though, he started to blog images …
Caleb Cox, 1 Jun 2011

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