Articles about cancer

Super Cali goes ballistic, Starbucks is on notice: Expensive milky coffee is something quite cancerous

A California judge has ordered major coffee chains to put a cancer warning on their beverages. Los Angeles Superior Court judge Elihu Berle ruled this week that, under state law, Starbucks and other coffee chains will have to put up a notice that compounds present in coffee can cause cancer. The judge said that, under …
Shaun Nichols, 30 Mar 2018
currywurst sausage covered in sauce and accompanied by fries/chips

Arrrgh! Put down the crisps! 'Ultra-processed' foods linked to cancer!

A study has suggested a link between diets high in ultra-processed foods and an increased risk of cancer – but academics have warned against over-interpreting the results. The work, published in the BMJ, assessed the diets – as reported through a survey – and cancer risk of a group of almost 105,000 French men and women. It …
Rebecca Hill, 15 Feb 2018

Going to Mars may give you cancer, warns doc

Aspiring astronauts might want to think twice before going to Mars, as scientists estimate that the risk of cancer doubles for long-term missions outside Earth’s magnetic field. A study by Francis Cucinotta, professor at the department of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences and Eliedonna Cacao, a PhD student at the …

Ex-IBMer sues Google for $10bn – after his web ad for 'divine honey cancer cure' was pulled

Shajar Abid, a former senior engineer at IBM and presently the "chief visionary officer" at Nubius Technologies LLC, has filed a lawsuit against Google, claiming that the online ad giant has suppressed his freedom of speech and religion. Abid, who goes by the first name "Shaq" on LinkedIn, claims to have developed "a divine …

London's Francis Crick Institute will house 1,250 cancer-fighting boffins

The first scientists are moving into the Francis Crick Institute, the biggest biomedical research institute under one roof, costing £650m. The super lab has a total floor space of 17.5 football fields – almost a million square feet. It is housed in an asymmetric silver building round the corner from King’s Cross station. By …
Nurse erects drip behind privacy curtain at hospital bed. Photo by Shutterstock

That Public Health study? No, it didn't say 'don't do chemo'

“Chemotherapy kills” was bound to pique our interest, especially since in the best traditions of modern research, its source was a badly-reported scientific study. The screaming headlines were just as you'd expect: “Chemotherapy warning as hundreds die from cancer fighting drugs” from Blighty's The Telegraph; almost the same …

Bing web searches may reveal you have cancer (so, er, don't use Bing?)

Search engine results can be a useful predictor for cancer and can even beat doctors to the mark, according to new research from Microsoft. In a paper published in the Journal of Oncology Practice, a Redmond team detailed how, by analyzing data from Bing users who looked up symptoms of pancreatic cancer, they could get an …
Iain Thomson, 8 Jun 2016
Rat

Rats revive phones-and-cancer scares

Mobile phones do cause cancers – and rats' cells are modulation-sensitive. That's what emerges from a preliminary study dropped on a pre-print server by America's National Toxicology Program. That news comes a few weeks after a huge study covering decades found that mobile phones weren't killing us. The new study hit the …

29 years of data shows no mobile phone brain cancer link

An Australian study has found no increase in brain cancers over the last 29 years, despite enormous increase in use of mobile phones. The study, relies on the fact that all cases of cancer are recorded in Australia. That means the study's authors were able to examine “the association between age and gender-specific incidence …
Crop of doctor with pen and clipboard

Big data in action: How CompSci theory helps medics fight cancer

It’s all very well sucking in exabytes of data from snazzy new sensors, but what can you actually do with it all? Genetic medicine is coming along nicely but in computational terms that is the easy job, since we have a decent model of how genes work. Joining big biomedical data sets together is stupidly hard since the points …
Dominic Connor, 11 Apr 2016
Big Bang

Little bang for the Big C? Nitro in the anti-cancer arsenal

It's often the case that when people talk of wonder drugs in cancer they most often think of the latest exquisitely engineered molecules that closely target very specific biochemical pathways. Think high cost, think high science, and think high hopes. And yet there's evidence mounting that one of our oldest and most widely …
Pan Pantziarka, 27 Oct 2015
Neil Cardy's massive bacon sarnie from a cafe on the A90

Bacon as deadly as cigarettes and asbestos

In really, really bad news for bacon lovers, a shock report says the World Health Organisation (WHO) will next week add processed meat to its "carcinogenic to humans" list. That's according to the Daily Mail, which claims that, according to "a well-placed source", a gathering of international scientists have checked the …
Lester Haines, 23 Oct 2015
shutterstock_196823585-wafer

Samsung Electronics coughs up £55m for cancer-stricken workers

About seventy people have died and more than 200 have been diagnosed with cancer at Samsung's displays and chips factories, and having accepted responsibility in May 2014 the tech giant this week announced a 100 billion won (£55m) fund for victims. Workers and campaigners have attributed illnesses such as lymphoma and leukemia …
Simon Rockman, 6 Aug 2015

Cell division: The engine of life – and of CANCER. Now some of its secrets are revealed

We each begin our existence as a single cell, which divides into new cells which divide into new cells. Old tissues are replaced, wounds heal, our ears – not especially useful – keep on growing even once they're quite big enough, thank you*. Cell division is pretty much the miracle of life – and yet we still don't understand …
Lewis Page, 14 Jul 2015

Chips can kill: Official

The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has grimly concluded that those tucking into fried potato products run an increased risk of damaged DNA and developing cancer. The culprit is the chemical acrylamide (AA), which "naturally forms in starchy food products during every-day high-temperature cooking (frying, baking, …
Lester Haines, 8 Jun 2015
MGH's microbead diagnostics

US hospital boffins demo cancer-busting smartphone kit

America's FTC might be chasing after snake-oilers offering “detect cancer” smartphone apps, but that doesn't mean your mobe can't play a genuine diagnostic role. Researchers from the Massachusetts General Hospital reckon with a bit of cloudy goodness, custom-made add-on optics and the right reagent kit, smartphones can gather …
Crop of doctor with pen and clipboard

Digital pathology and the big Cs (that’s ‘cancer’ and ‘cloud’)

Comment Have I got cancer? “Maybe," says my oncologist, “so I’m going to take a biopsy and we’ll have a look.” A small piece of my body, tissue from the potentially cancerous organ, is obtained through an incision, and sent to a pathology lab. A thin, thin slice is cut off, stained with revealing chemicals, and then checked by a …
Chris Mellor, 3 Apr 2015
Crop of doctor with pen and clipboard

Is there a cure for cancer sitting at the back of the medicine cabinet already?

A solid tumour is the perfect example of a complex adaptive system at work. It is an ecosystem with competitive and cooperative networks of cells at play. This is one of the reasons why cancer is so difficult to treat. Historically, the approach has been to blast tumours with the most toxic drugs at our disposal – cytotoxic …

Create a news alert about cancer, or find more stories about cancer.

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018