Articles about Xerox

Top500: 'Sky River 2' still rules as graphics tech leaves HPC applecart largely untouched

SC13 The Top500 ranking of the world's fastest supercomputers has been released, and the list of the top five systems could very well be simply a Xerox copy of the previous list, which came out back in summer. In the June rankings, the number one spot was taken by the massively parallel Tianhe-2 (Milky Way-2) at China's National …
Rik Myslewski, 18 Nov 2013

Every man, woman and child in the UK paid HP £21 last year

The government spends billions of pounds on IT every year. While individual projects often make the news when investigated by auditors and select committees, the overall picture is less well-known. But it IS big business – both because of how much is spent, but also because just a few big businesses suck up very large amounts …
SA Mathieson, 12 Nov 2013
William Lowe. Credit: Marcin Wichary

RIP Bill Lowe: Father of the IBM PC no longer reading drive C

Obit William (Bill) C. Lowe, the IBM manager who broke through Big Blue's corporate structure to build its first personal computer (and inadvertently made Microsoft the industry's powerhouse) has died at the age of 72 after a heart attack. Lowe joined IBM in 1962 and swiftly rose through the ranks to become lab director at the …
Iain Thomson, 29 Oct 2013

What the CUFF? Nokia shows how a smartwatch really OUGHT to work

Video Boffins working for Nokia have knocked together a prototype smartwatch with six screens, and patented the ways in which one might use it should such a thing ever become technically practical. The Nokia Facet isn't a product, it isn't even a prototype, but the functional model lets Nokia engineers work out how one might …
Bill Ray, 18 Oct 2013

SEC asks Affiliated Computer Services to step aside, snaps on rubber glove

The Securities and Exchange Commission is probing bean counting methods used by Xerox tentacle Affiliated Computer Services. In a filing, the copier monster confirmed the SEC has been "conducting an investigation of certain accounting practices" at ACS, an outsourcing and data centre management player that Xerox forked out $6. …
Paul Kunert, 08 Oct 2013
Suitcase bulging with cash

UK investor throws £14.8m at firm that makes UNFORGEABLE 2-cent labels

UK investment house Invesco has acquired 13 per cent of Norway's ThinFilm, just as the company prepares to launch its first printed product, which it tells us will cost almost two cents. The investment gives Invesco 56 million shares in ThinFilm, which amounts to 13.3 per cent of the company, but this should provide the …
Bill Ray, 07 Sep 2013
Xerox WorkCentre 7535

Xerox begins rolling out patches for jumbled-numbers copier glitch

Two weeks after it was first made aware of the problem, Xerox has begun rolling out a fix for a software glitch that caused numbers in documents scanned by certain of its WorkCentre multi-function printers (MFPs) to come up garbled. "Our engineering team has been working around the clock to deliver the patch," Xerox wrote in a …
Neil McAllister, 22 Aug 2013

12 simple rules: How Ted Codd transformed the humble database

Anniversary Edgar – or Ted – Codd is one of the most influential figures in computing. Born 90 years today*, Codd – who passed away in 2003 – was the man who first conceived of the relational model for database management. Relational databases are today ubiquitous – on your PC, in your smartphone, in your bank’s ATMs, inside airline …
Gavin Clarke, 19 Aug 2013

Xerox admits there's no fix yet for number-fudging copiers

A flaw in the scanning compression software of some Xerox copiers which changes digits and numbers run through the machine is worse than first thought and will require a full software upgrade, the self-styled "Document Company" has said. The flaw was first spotted by German computer science student David Kriesel, who …
Iain Thomson, 14 Aug 2013
Xerox WorkCentre 7535

Patching Xerox's number-changing photocopy phlaw will take weeks

Xerox has told its customers that their copiers may continue churning out dodgy numbers for a few weeks unless they change the settings on their hardware. "To hear and see this frustration and confusion goes against all that's core to Xerox's heritage and future," wrote Rick Dastin, president of Xerox's office and solutions …
Iain Thomson, 08 Aug 2013
Xerox WorkCentre 7535

Xerox copier flaw changes numbers in scanned docs

Updated A German PhD student has found a flaw in some Xerox Workcentres that fudges the numbers on some scans thanks to poor data compression. Last Wednesday, computer science student David Kriesel was scanning in some building plans on a Xerox WorkCentre, and when checking the copies he found some of the dimensions of the plans had …
Iain Thomson, 06 Aug 2013
Henrik Rosendahl, senior VP Cloud Solutions, Quantum

Quizzed Quantum veep quashes hardware quit rumours

Interview Is big data and big storage biz Quantum finally moving away from its hardware business to the cloud? This question was raised by a statement from Henrik Rosendahl, Quantum's Cloud Solutions SVP: Quantum is transitioning its business from being a predominantly hardware-based, on-premise data protection provider to turning into a …
Chris Mellor, 01 Aug 2013

Apple crushes all competition in US Brand of the Year survey

Americans love their Apples. A new Harris Interactive poll surveyed 38,814 US consumers, who ranked Apple as Brand of the Year in three categories: smartphones, tablets, and computers. "Americans continue to give Apple brands strong ratings," Harris Interactive SVP Manny Flores said in a release announcing the results. …
Rik Myslewski, 26 Jul 2013
Douglas Engelbart and mouse

Douglas Engelbart, PC pioneer and creator of the mouse, dies at 88

Obit Douglas Engelbart, the creator of the computer mouse and the man who pushed the computer industry into the graphical user interface age, has died in his California home at the age of 88 from kidney failure. Douglas Engelbart and mouse Douglas Engelbart and the first mouse In 1967 Engelbart filed Patent No. 3,541,541 for "X …
Iain Thomson, 03 Jul 2013
TNMOC

Rise of the machines, south of Milton Keynes

Geek's Guide to Britain It’s the sounds that get you: wheels spinning, processors squeaking, the furious hammering of teleprinters, and some 1980s synth. Yes, computers really were this noisy – something you forget in an era when even the benign tap of the keyboard is giving away to the silent swoosh of finger on glass. I’m at The National Museum of …
Gavin Clarke, 29 Jun 2013
Justin Rattner

Intel CTO Rattner steps down to attend to 'pressing family matter'

One of the most familiar faces of chip giant Intel is CTO Justin Rattner, and he has just announced his departure from the company. Rattner joined Chipzilla in 1973, and six years later he was the company's first principal engineer. He was named its fourth Intel Fellow in 1988 thanks in large part to his work in parallel …
The Register breaking news

Andreessen, Metcalfe, Stallman and Swartz added to Internet Hall of Fame

The Internet Society has announced the latest inductees into the Internet Hall of Fame, and is including a posthumous entry for internet activist Aaron Swartz. The Internet Hall of Fame was founded last year, and this second round adds 32 appointees in three categories: Pioneers, Innovators, and Connectors. The new inductees …
Iain Thomson, 27 Jun 2013
Robot babe

Who wants a 'robot companion'? Look no further than Intel Labs

Interview Can you imagine IBM Research ever developing a social robot companion? Intel CTO Justin Rattner can’t, but he’s happy for his own researchers to build one – and for the technology to find its way into the market. Eventually. Ask most techies of a certain age how a company should carry out research and development and they will …
Joe Fay, 06 Jun 2013
The Register breaking news

Veteran researchers: Cheapo US biz R&D risks innovation FAIL

Ethernet Summit The US has a problem: basic scientific research is underfunded, as is support for the work needed to translate basic research into marketable products. As a result, the US is in danger of falling behind its global technology competitors. Such was the conclusion of a panel of past and present research luminaries gathered for …
Rik Myslewski, 29 May 2013
axe_channel_teaser

Danwood axes 200 after discovering 'accounting weaknesses'

Top brass at print consultancy the Danwood Group axed 200 staff as part of an operational review following the discovery of systemic accounting errors relating to services contracts. The details of the job cuts were laid bare in a Companies House filing today for the Lincoln-based HP, Xerox and Canon sales biz, covering …
Paul Kunert, 28 May 2013
management management3

SAP shuffles execs to chase cloud success

It is time for musical chairs at SAP, and the desire to ramp-up products that run on the cloud and sell more of them is calling the tune to which the executives are dancing. The German software giant said in a statement that Lars Dalgaard, head of its entire cloud operations and the founder and CEO of SuccessFactors, was …

Tech firm CEOs more restrained than most at limiting personal pay

If you want to see the greatest disparity between the average worker and the CEO's pay packet, America is the place to be. But while the heads of many blue-chip US firms cash in more than most, the country's technology bosses are more abstemious. Since 2010, the Securities and Exchange Commission has required publicly-traded …
Iain Thomson, 03 May 2013

Move over, Mythbusters: Was Archimedes an ancient STEVE JOBS?

Happy birthday Archimedes! The Syracusan mathematician, engineer and philosopher came into the world in 287BC. We don't know the exact date of his birth 2,300 years ago, but an appreciation of the twenty-third centenary of his birth seems apt. An engraving from 1824 edition of Mechanics Magazine. Source:Wikimedia (public …
Simon Sharwood, 17 Apr 2013
The Register breaking news

MuleSoft kicks out app integration platform

After a long gestation, MuleSoft has kicked out an application integration software platform it calls Anypoint. The suite, announced on Wednesday, sees enterprise service bus-specialist MuleSoft arming enterprises with tech that lets them deal with the cats-cradle of interdependencies created by sprawling IT estates. Anypoint …
Jack Clark, 03 Apr 2013

Gartner forecasts pro 3D printer prices below $2,000 by 2016

Analyst house Gartner has caught the 3D printing bug with its latest forecast on the future of the industry, and predicts enterprise-quality printers being cheap and plentiful by 2016. "3D printing is a technology accelerating to mainstream adoption," said Pete Basiliere, research director at Gartner. "The hype leads many …
Iain Thomson, 29 Mar 2013
Sinclair ZX Microdrive

Infinite loop: the Sinclair ZX Microdrive story

Archaeologic They would, Clive Sinclair claimed on 23 April 1982, revolutionise home computer storage. Significantly cheaper than the established 5.25-inch and emerging 3.5-inch floppy drives of the time - though not as capacious or as fast to serve up files - ‘Uncle’ Clive’s new toy would “change the face of personal computing”, Sinclair …
Tony Smith, 13 Mar 2013

Ethernet at 40: Its daddy reveals its turbulent youth

Feature When Bob Metcalfe, the prime mover behind the invention of Ethernet, recently visited the site of that invention, Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), The Reg had the opportunity to sit down with him to discuss the history of Ethernet, its advantages over Token Ring, and IBM's perfidy. Metcalfe was in town to promote a …
Rik Myslewski, 09 Feb 2013
The Register breaking news

Brit boffins GANG-RESEARCH tiny LEDs for 1Gbps network

A consortium of UK universities have banded together to spend some government cash building very small LEDs with a view to creating broadcast networks capable of hitting 1Gbps. The team, led by the University of Strathclyde and taking contributions from research units at Cambridge, Edinburgh, Oxford and St Andrews, plans to …
Bill Ray, 04 Feb 2013
Steve Jobs and the Apple Lisa

Happy birthday, Lisa: Apple's slow but heavy workhorse turns 30

Read a press release from Apple in the 1990s and it'll end with something along the lines of: “Apple ignited the personal computer revolution in the 1970s with the Apple II and reinvented the personal computer in the 1980s with the Macintosh.” All of which is true up to a point, but the statement does overlook the product …
Bob Dormon, 18 Jan 2013
The Register breaking news

Apple raids Xerox YET AGAIN - for its chief beancounter

Xerox has announced that Apple has snaffled its chief financial officer Luca Maestri to be the new Cupertino corporate controller from the end of February. The firm synonymous with photocopying said Maestri was a "stellar finance executive" and that it had started a search to replace him. Maestri will take over from ex-Appler …
© Copyright Anthony O'Neil and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Oracle, Dell, CSC, Xerox, Symantec accused of paying ZERO UK tax

Tech giants Oracle, Xerox, Dell, CSC and Symantec paid no corporate tax in the UK last year despite pocketing nearly £500m from public-sector IT contracts, it was claimed last night. According to a study undertaken by Charlie Elphicke, Conservative MP for Dover, the five US behemoths banked taxpayers' cash and had a combined …
Paul Kunert, 08 Jan 2013
connections_global_internet

30 years ago, at flip of a switch, the internet as we know it WAS BORN

Analysis Thirty years ago this week the modern internet became operational as the US military flipped the switch on TCP/IP, but the move to the protocol stack was nearly killed at birth. The deadline was 1 January, 1983: after this, any of the Advanced Research Projects Agency Network's (ARPANET) 400 hosts that were still clinging to …
Gavin Clarke, 03 Jan 2013
The Register breaking news

China lags on new tech patents

Japan’s technology giants may be struggling to cope commercially with cheaper rivals from China and beyond but they’re still among the most innovative companies in the world, according to the IEEE. The institute’s sixth annual Patent Power scorecard ranks firms according to the size and quality of their US patent portfolios in …
Phil Muncaster, 21 Dec 2012
The Register breaking news

Microsoft's Steve Ballmer named 'most improved tech CEO'

Jobs and career community website Glassdoor has named Microsoft boss Steve Ballmer its "most improved tech CEO" for 2012, though judging by the numbers it's a dubious honor, to say the least. According to the site's latest annual Tech Company Comparison Report, which it published on Tuesday, Microsoft's chief exec scored a CEO …
Neil McAllister, 13 Dec 2012
ZX80

A history of personal computing in 20 objects part 2

Archaeologic Personal computing may have originally been more ‘computing’ than ‘personal, but that changed in the late 1970s in the US and, in the UK, during the early 1980s. In the first part of ‘A History of Personal Computing on 20 Objects’, we saw how computing went from maths gadgets to first mechanical, then electromechanical and …
Tony Smith, 02 Nov 2012
Babbage Difference Engine No. 1

A history of personal computing in 20 objects part 1

Archaeologic Personal computing. Personal. Computing. We take both aspects so completely for granted these days, it's almost impossible to think of a time when computing wasn't personal - or when there was no electronic or mechanical computing. To get from there to here, we've gone from a time when 'computers' were people able to do perform …
Tony Smith, 01 Nov 2012
Actian Vectorwise TPC-H

Actian daubs go-faster stripes on cheapo database kit

Comment Ingres descendent Actian says its Vectorwise analytics database tech doesn't need to rely on a flash memory boost: it uses multicore x86 features so well it's more than twice as fast as Oracle and SQL Server, and uses server, storage and networking hardware up to 40 times cheaper - or so we're told. Actian is actually Ingres, …
Chris Mellor, 21 Sep 2012
The Register breaking news

Patent flame storm: Reg hack biteback in reader-pack sack attack

Andrew's Mailbag My piece on patents on Tuesday received a record number of votes of disapproval for a Reg article. I'm not in the least bit surprised. That's because in my analysis I advance an argument you don't hear very often in the tech world. Which is that the patent system gives us a huge social benefit. It's an irreplaceable component …
Andrew Orlowski, 03 Sep 2012
The Register breaking news

'This lawsuit is not about patents or money, it's about values'

Quotw This was the week when analysts, pundits, beancounters and opinion-holders of all stripes got to have their say on the Apple v Samsung patent verdict going the fruity firm's way. While Apple pushed hard to get Samsung mobes pulled from the shelves as soon as humanly possible, the Korean chaebol vowed to fight on and passed …
The Register breaking news

Ho ho ho! Apple's Samsung ban bid pushed back to Christmas

US Judge Lucy Koh has postponed any decision to permanently ban sales of Samsung's mobiles until 6 December - just in time for the Christmas rush. The request to remove Sammy's gear from shop shelves came from Apple, which had just trounced its tech rival in their ongoing epic patent lawsuit. The judge said that since both …
Punk-styled girl with piercing gazes at an apple

Apple: I love to hate, and hate to love thee

Open ... and Shut I want to hate Apple. The company takes the most egregious of Microsoft's monopolistic practices and raises them to an art form. It's aggressive litigiousness threatens to impede innovation in the mobile industry for years to come: innovation that isn't Apple's, that is. And Apple's lust for control makes it a very poor centre …
Matt Asay, 29 Aug 2012

Lexmark dumps inkjet arm, sacks 1,700

Lexmark is to shut down its inkjet printing manufacturing and research operations, although it will continue to support and supply existing hardware and is keeping its laser printing division. "Today's announcement represents difficult decisions, which are necessary to drive improved profitability and significant savings," …
Iain Thomson, 28 Aug 2012
The Register breaking news

Cook's 'values' memo shows Apple has lost its soul

On the one year anniversary of his appointment as Apple CEO, Tim Cook must be partying especially hard in light of Friday's verdict against Samsung. But if his memo to staff about the verdict is anything to go by, in winning the case Apple has lost its soul. The memo, leaked to 9to5Mac, shows Cook is in no mood to play nice …
Iain Thomson, 25 Aug 2012
The Register breaking news

Technology tops Forbes list of 100 most powerful women

The latest list from Forbes of the 100 most powerful women on the planet suggests that the technology industry is leading the way in promoting sexual equality, contributing 15 per cent of the spots overall and a quarter of the top 20 positions. The technology industry contributed more names to the list (see below) than any …
Iain Thomson, 24 Aug 2012

Apple's patent insanity infects Silicon Valley

Open ... and Shut Spotting a patent troll used to be easy. They were the ones who sold lawsuits, not products. Companies like Intellectual Ventures picked up the title "patent troll" from critics as they went beyond buying and licensing patents to suing companies like Dell and Hewlett-Packard over claimed violations. That is, until the industry …
Matt Asay, 22 Aug 2012
Victorinox Swisstool Spirit plus

Sick of juggling apps on biz PCs? This install tool will save your sanity

Sysadmin blog I've spent most of the past week in the San Francisco bay area. I've visited Nerd Mecca (Xerox PARC), various universities and Big Tech campuses. I've seen the Golden Gate Bridge, cursed San Francisco drivers, and discovered why Americans loathe AT&T. I've had a fantastic time down here, but the highlight of the trip has been …
Trevor Pott, 10 Aug 2012
VMware logo

VMware shells out $1.26bn for virtual networker Nicira

The networking business just got a wake-up call from server virtualizer VMware in the guise of a $1.26bn acquisition of virty networker Nicira. VMware's CTO Steve Herrod has been talking up the concept of the "software-defined data center" for the past couple of months, and the server virtualization juggernaut and cloud …

Forget internet fridges and Big Data. Where's my internet fish tank?

Sysadmin blog The Cloud is a great new way to store and access data, and Big Data is all about leafing through this stuff so you can figure out how to "target your audience" more accurately, almost always with advertising. These are the buzzwords of the now. Lost in all the hype is why we advertise stuff in the first place: we have something …
Trevor Pott, 03 Jul 2012
Justin Rattner

Intel invests millions in social computing research center

At Intel Labs' annual outing, Chipzilla has announced it is investing millions in a new social research center and explained how it plans to avoid the mistakes of researchers in the past. The new Intel Science Technology Center is a $15m program funding five years of research into social and anthropological research into how …
Iain Thomson, 27 Jun 2012
grab_that_cash

Mighty Blighty's channel like a giant looming across the, er, Channel

IT distributors in the UK shifted some £1.76bn worth of kit and services in Q1, stats from Context reveal. This represents a whopping 18 per cent spike on revenues generated by the channel a year ago in spite of low consumer and business confidence and the storm clouds gathering over the Euro. "The UK market posted stronger …
Paul Kunert, 15 Jun 2012